#1
If i'm delivering vocals via shouting w/ a little singing i.e the unseen, strike anywhere and anti-flag, how can I preserve my voice, 'cos usually it starts to go croaky and horrible after a few songs. Thanks.
#2
don't talk........ever
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#3
Don't use your throat to push air out, use your stomach/lungs for power. If you use your throat too much, it can cause that.
#5
^ funny kid, get cancer. Using your lungs more than your throat just like with screaming you use more of your stomach area to growl or whatever.
#7
yes, learning to growl took me years of practicing. Screaming is another hard one....i open my mouth and try too do it but i cant........ these are vital musical skills.......playing an instrument is a sinch after learning how to growl.....lol losers, play sum proper music and stop crying
#9
yeah push from your diaphragm, if you're doing it right you'll feel your abs tighten up. also just as an fyi, i noted this in another thread, if yer screaming properly it shouldn't hurt at all.
#10
Growling sounds good in singing but if u wear out ur chords sing clean for a bit to get back to the sound of ur voice
#11
As far as taking the strain off of your vocal cords goes:

1) When you breathe in, allow your stomach and chest cavity to fully expand. Then, use the muscles in your upper abdomen (also known as the diaphragm) and push on the air. This will give you a steady stream of air, and allow for more volume/energy with less strain on the throat.
2) Keep your neck relaxed. Don't push with your vocal cords, that just tightens them and makes the strain worse and gives them a rough sound. Don't tilt your head back, keep it solidly forward. The best way to hit a high note is with the right technique, not to just push as hard as you can til it comes out.
3) Try to avoid things like smoking, drinking liquids or eating foods that cause a lot of buildup... sugary candy (starburst are so horrible) tend to block up your throat with mucous, and that's your worst enemy as a singer from a physical standpoint. When you're singing, drink water, and if you feel a little buildup just gargle with water (you can add salt if it's really nasty, but usually water does fine)
4) If you're sick or your vocal cords are tired out, take it easy and let them rest for a bit. Your endurance will gradually improve.
#12
Carefully remove your larynx and freeze it. Keep it in the freezer or an icebox of some sort. Take it out and use it before every gig/rehearsal. Also make sure you learn American sign language and even during the show make sure you take plenty of cough drops.
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This was a f***ing bomb dropping on Beaver Cleaverville. For a few seconds, this place was Armageddon!
There was a firefight!
#13
get a really raspy cough and then try singing with all that mucus in your throat. (effortless raspy shout-singing)