#1
^ Read the title.

So what's the big difference? I know a mode is a way of playing a scale in a different order, but why not just call the ionian, locrian etc scales?
#2
They are scales.

Modes are just a group of scales.
Populus vult decipi. Decipiatur.

Quote by Mistress_Ibanez
It's can be a contraction and genitive case.

Quote by Mistress_Ibanez
If you cut down on these costs students won't learn so well, effecting the "quality"...
#3
Take from http://www.zentao.com/guitar/modes/


For most musicians, the terms scale and mode are interchangeable. While there is a certain amount of truth to this perception, understanding the difference between a scale and a mode is essential.

A scale can be defined as a series of notes, arranged by order of pitch, between a root and the octave. Theoretically, any combination of notes between the root and octave could be considered a scale. On the more practical side, there are a finite number of note combinations that have gained acceptance in western music. Eastern music, on the other hand, tends to be more open-ended as far as the note combinations that are considered acceptable.

A mode can be thought of as a way of manipulating the notes of a scale in order to generate a greater variety of sounds. The focus of this lesson is on the modes of the major scale. Modal manipulation of scales other than the major scale is covered elsewhere.
-Mithaearon-
"Just because you can, doesn't mean you should."
#4
Okay, I think I understand now. Btw, could you use any scale to form modes?
#5
Quote by J.A.M
Okay, I think I understand now. Btw, could you use any scale to form modes?


I was actually doing this with my guitar teacher today lol!

Yes, you can form a mode from any scale.

Here is a little Word arrangement to help you with naming modes.

"If Dora Plays Like Me, Alls Lost"

Ionian
Dorian
Phyrigian
Lydian
Myxoldyian
Aeolian
Locrian

To form a mode, you take a scale, and build it from the postion in the scale that your mode corresponds to. For example - Ionian - 1st note, Dorian - 2nd note etc........Locrian 7th note.

heres an example.

Take the C major scale

CDEFGABC

C maj Ionian - CDEFGABC (1st not in scale)
C maj Dorian - DEFGABCD (2nd note in scale etc......)
Cmaj Phrigian - EFGABCDE
C maj Lydian - FGABCDEF
C maj Mixolydian - GABCDEFG
C maj Aeolian - ABCDEFGA
C maj Locrian - BCDEFGAB

It can be done with any scale - major or minor, using flats, sharps etc.

Something else worth noting - C IONIAN = Major scale
Gear List;

Laney VH100R with Matching Cab
Ibanez RGT42FM
Schecter C-1+
BC Rich Neck Thru Warlock
ISP Noise Decimator
Ibanez TS9
#6
Sorry - UG freezes up when i make large posts..........

Something else worth noting - C IONIAN = Major scale is also related to the A Aeolian which is the natural minor.

Another important factor to remember with modes, is that you can use more than one scale to form say, and Ionian mode. Many people incorrectly believe that you can only use one - for example - D Dorian. You can use Eb dorian, Bb Dorian, Gb Dorian, (which is F#), C# Dorian etc. It realates to the position of the scale where you take your note from.

Hope that helped you out a bit mate,

repost if you want to know anything else.

Dan
Gear List;

Laney VH100R with Matching Cab
Ibanez RGT42FM
Schecter C-1+
BC Rich Neck Thru Warlock
ISP Noise Decimator
Ibanez TS9
#8
Quote by Logz
I've wrote an in depth set of lessons on modes:

modality 1/4; what are modes, and mode construction
modality 2/4; how chords are created using modes
modality 3/4; Modal chord progressions
ive not completed 4/4 yet, but it will be about modes of the harmonic and melodic minor scales.


Nice one!

You know what your talking about Logz - is the stuff I mentioned above correct???

Cheers,

Dan
Gear List;

Laney VH100R with Matching Cab
Ibanez RGT42FM
Schecter C-1+
BC Rich Neck Thru Warlock
ISP Noise Decimator
Ibanez TS9
#9
I read those lessons, and modes is something I been struggling to grasp for a while. I was understanding it fine until I got to the D Phyrigian part. I thought D mode was Dorian...so why would it be D Phrygian, which is also further confusing because it came from Bb major?!
#10
use this chart: W means whole step, H means half step. Start on a root note like E or A, and go up accordingly to whichever mode you want.
#11
Ok so, then D Phrygian would be the Dorian mode then added with the interval pattern of the Phrygian or wha?...