#1
Which one is more damaging for your wrist? I have a tenon infection in my wrist, or i recently had anyway, and im just starting to play again. So i was wondering what i should do to avoid such infection later on?
Well, just to be like everyone else, here's my rig:

Fender American Stratocaster
Epiphone Les Paul Custom
Washburn J28SDL

Mesa/Boogie F-50 Combo
#2
which one what?
"He remembered that they were but flesh, a passing breeze that does not return"
#3
Anchoring or not anchoring. Sorry if i was unclear
Well, just to be like everyone else, here's my rig:

Fender American Stratocaster
Epiphone Les Paul Custom
Washburn J28SDL

Mesa/Boogie F-50 Combo
#5
What the hell is anchoring? Are you in the Navy or what?
"Virtually no one who is taught Relativity continues to read the Bible."

#6
Anchoring is damaging if you routinely use too much pressure. Learn both and alternate as each one becomes more beneficial for an instance of playing.

Quote by Bubonic Chronic
What the hell is anchoring? Are you in the Navy or what?


resting the pinky of the picking hand on the body of the guitar to stablelize wrist movement. It offers more control at the expense of range of movement and in some cases, speed.
Schecter C-1 Classic (Antique Amber)
Ibanez JEM 7VWH
Crate Palamino Class A tube combo
Digitech RP80 Multieffects pedal
Ibanez TS9 DX Tube Screamer
Last edited by Bazilisck311 at Sep 29, 2006,
#7
Ah, the ole anchoring debate...

All I'll say is it's best if you don't HAVE to anchor your hand in order to control the
pick. You can learn to control the pick just as well without touching the guitar. If
you have to anchor, that's basically a crutch and it could hamper your progress.

And before you say "Well, so and so anchors and he pwns blah blah". Don't bother.
Heard it all before. It's not a particularly good argument for your own development.
#8
Quote by refgerto
Which one is more damaging for your wrist? I have a tenon infection in my wrist, or i recently had anyway, and im just starting to play again. So i was wondering what i should do to avoid such infection later on?


That was about, what, 5 days ago that you made a thread about wrist pains and i warned you about the potential damage you can cause yourself? Wtf kind of wimpy infection lasts a few days?
#9
A week ago, and my doctor said we caught it really early on, so it was no problem^^
Well, just to be like everyone else, here's my rig:

Fender American Stratocaster
Epiphone Les Paul Custom
Washburn J28SDL

Mesa/Boogie F-50 Combo
#11
Actually, i do. And this is no joke, im really grateful. I doubt i would have ever gone to the doctor if it wasn't for you, and it might have gotten chronic. So a big thank you your way
Well, just to be like everyone else, here's my rig:

Fender American Stratocaster
Epiphone Les Paul Custom
Washburn J28SDL

Mesa/Boogie F-50 Combo
#13
Addenum: Did you ask the doctor what he would recommend to reduce the risk of reoccurrence?
Schecter C-1 Classic (Antique Amber)
Ibanez JEM 7VWH
Crate Palamino Class A tube combo
Digitech RP80 Multieffects pedal
Ibanez TS9 DX Tube Screamer
#14
Quote by edg
And before you say "Well, so and so anchors and he pwns blah blah". Don't bother. Heard it all before. It's not a particularly good argument for your own development.


I'm not gonna say your right or wrong, and I don't want this to get turned into a heated arguement or anything... but because another "so and so" doesn't anchor that means he's right, and the person who anchors is wrong? Why? If they can both play to the best of their ability and can make great music why would it matter if one person anchors and the other one doesn't? If everyone was built the same way, and playing a guitar un-anchored was the only way you could play properly then I would agree with you. But we're not all built the same, and if someone can play perfectly, and without flaws with an anchored technique isn't that what really matters?

I'm not gonna say that one technique is better then the other, each player has a different method of playing their instrument, and the trick is to find yours.

I wouldn't listen to all these people who say "it's bad technique", and "it'll hamper your developement" Because only you know what is best for you, and your guitar playing. Do whatever you think is best for you... try out both methods for a while and see which one works better. And take other peoples advice with a grain of salt.

I use sort of a combination of both, and when I'm anchoring I put no pressure at all the the guitar... it's just touching very lightly. I wouldn't even consider anchoring now that I think about it, because anchoring, atleast the most common way of doing it, means to keep your finger(s) (typically the pinky) stationary while your pick moves around the strings, and all my fingers move with my picking motion, they're just lightly touching the pguard or muting the high strings.

Like I said before, just try out both methods and find out for yourself which one works better for you.
Hai UG!
#15
This has been bothering me and I didn't want to make another anchoring thread, huge argument, is it anchoring when you but your hand like your palm muting but over the bridge? I do that when I play and I don't put any pressure down but it helps me mute the strings when I'm not playing chords and my hand still moves with the pick.
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Looking for: an acoustic, recording gear, or $
#16
I've asked my guitar teacher about this. He basically said that your going to have to have some part on your hand touching the guitar, or else your accuracy is really bad and you slow down alot.

He anchors and he hasnt had any problems, so I continue to anchor.
#17
Quote by TJM2482
I've asked my guitar teacher about this. He basically said that your going to have to have some part on your hand touching the guitar, or else your accuracy is really bad and you slow down alot.

He anchors and he hasnt had any problems, so I continue to anchor.


No offence, but your guitar teacher is wrong. Look at Paul Gilbert, most accurate picker I've even seen and he doesn't anchor. The only time not anchoring makes you less accurate is when you're just going from anchoring to not-anchoring. After you get not-anchoring down, you're good to go, and faster than you were before.
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#18
Someone answer this. I have huge hands, and I scrape my fingers. When I move my hands out of scraping position they only place they can go is where the pickguard used to be (I removed it.. kept hitting my hands on it..).

So what do I do? Anchoring doesnt hurt my hands because its just a natural position for them to go to. Oddly I cant anchor when fingerpicking. And I dont when strumming obviously.
#19
Quote by blues_rocker
No offence, but your guitar teacher is wrong. Look at Paul Gilbert, most accurate picker I've even seen and he doesn't anchor. The only time not anchoring makes you less accurate is when you're just going from anchoring to not-anchoring. After you get not-anchoring down, you're good to go, and faster than you were before.


His teachers is not wrong just because he has a different opnion about it then you. I'd like to see this golden rule you guys are following that says anchoring is bad, and it's not proper technique.

If you can play great with either technique, that's all that matters. So get over it. Some people anchor some don't that's life... besides music is art, and art has no rules, anything goes.
Hai UG!
#20
Anchoring is technically more damaging for your picking hand.

But that's only if you routinely anchor with huge amounts of pressure.

It doesn't really qualify as anchoring unless you're picking using the muscles controlling your fingers more than your wrist and arm combined.

So you should try not to anchor. You can have your fingers on the body, just don't keep them stationary.

In short, do whatever you want, but stay relaxed.
Every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you
#21
Quote by L_Z_Nut
His teachers is not wrong just because he has a different opnion about it then you. I'd like to see this golden rule you guys are following that says anchoring is bad, and it's not proper technique.

If you can play great with either technique, that's all that matters. So get over it. Some people anchor some don't that's life... besides music is art, and art has no rules, anything goes.


Not really. You can play better without anchoring, and you can live without carpal tunnel. Win-win.
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#22
[quote="L_Z_NutIf you can play great with either technique, that's all that matters. So get over it. Some people anchor some don't that's life... besides music is art, and art has no rules, anything goes.

Sigh. Yeah, but if you START OUT anchoring and never really learn the pick control
with your arm muscles as well, your picking MAY never develop right. That's using
the guitar as a crutch. It may be you'll manage that while anchoring. My own
experience is that I was never fully developing my picking until I took my hand off
the guitar and WORKED on it. Now, it doesn't matter, I have a choice and much
greater freedom.

For a teacher to promote that, well, that's bad. That's not a teacher I'd go to.
#23
You guys just don't get it. My desk is softer then your heads.

I'm not saying that anchoring is good, and I'm not saying it's bad. If it works for you, all the power to you man, but if someone plays anchored, and is really great, and plays without errors, then who the hell are you to say that his technique is wrong? If it works for him it's right... for him. Again, the trick is to find what works for you. Experiment, try both out, try both together. Just because it works for you doesn't make it the be all end all of "proper technique".

Carpal tunnel... LOL that's a laugh. I've met a quite a few really old guitarist, some of them I know, some that work at my LMS, and some that were just trying out guitars, who play amazing and who've anchored for years and haven't had any problems with CT. Hell, there's a shjt load of great guitarist who've played anchored longer then you, and I have been alive, and they play just as good or better then when they were younger.

Besides a guitarist is the least likely person to get CT when it comes to musicians, the most common musicians to get it is a pianist. Also, playing your guitar too low will give you CT a lot faster then anchoring. I've never ever met a guitarist who had a deformed claw for a hand, and when you ask thee how it happened they say "I use to anchor my picking hand". The most common people who get it are people who type for really long time, once again, pianists, sculptors and printmakers.

This whole good, bad technique is BS. If you can play great with your technique, good or bad.... I don't know how many times I have to say this... that's all that matters.

That's it for me and this thread... the only thing I'll probably add is *read my previous posts*
Hai UG!
#24
Well, there's no technique better than other, but if you feel too much pain then you must doing something wrong and you have to find out what is it and correct it. Thats the way you will know that you are progressing.
Besides being a guitar player, I'm a big fan of the guitar. I love that damn instrument. Steve Vai

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#25
Does what I do count as anchoring?

I put the nail of my pinky on the pickguard and it slides around...

Does that really count?
#26
Quote by wylde_overdrive
Does what I do count as anchoring?

I put the nail of my pinky on the pickguard and it slides around...

Does that really count?


If you use it as a support to guide your pick, yes.
Besides being a guitar player, I'm a big fan of the guitar. I love that damn instrument. Steve Vai

Gear:
Kramer Striker FR422SM
Roland Microcube
Digitech Bad Monkey
Dunlop Tortex 1.14mm picks


MY VIDEOS