#1
What's the difference between, say, a song in 5/4 and a song in 5/8? I know one is five quarter notes and the other is five eighth notes, but wouldn't it come out to five beats anyway?

I'm guessing it has something to do with song structure, since starting a song in 5/4 and switching to 5/8 later would change the sound.
#3
Quote by bangoodcharlote
You could write a 5/4 song in 5/8 and a 5/8 song in 5/4. You would have to adjust the tempo, but you could do it without much trouble.

That's what I thought. You can adjust the tempo and the songs would be exactly the same.
#5
Quote by PinkFloyd73
no you cant...do not use that advice...5/4 and 5/8 will have differnt feels

5/4 = 5 beats, quarter note is one beat.

5/8 = 5 beats, eighth note gets one beat.

This is correct, right?

Now, if I take a song in 5/8, put it in 5/4, and adjust the tempo so that the eighth note in the song previously is now the same as quarter note is now, then they still won't be the same?

Someone explain this to me, please.
#6
its hard to explain to you right now...i learn classical music and jazz so i now a whole lot about theory and stuff and its my understanding that they have differnt feels...just how a 6/8 cant become a 3/4 very well. im sure 5/4 has a certain feel, and 5/8 has a certain feel, just as 6/8 is kindo of fiddle like music, and 3/4 is waltz
#7
Quote by Scourge441
5/4 = 5 beats, quarter note is one beat.

5/8 = 5 beats, eighth note gets one beat.

This is correct, right?

Now, if I take a song in 5/8, put it in 5/4, and adjust the tempo so that the eighth note in the song previously is now the same as quarter note is now, then they still won't be the same?

Someone explain this to me, please.



no, this is a very common misconception. This is what 4th grade band instructors tell people so that they can understand things in /8 time, but that's not it.


There are two types of time signatures: simple and compound. Anything /4 is simple.

3/4, 4/4, bla bla bla, you get it. Its the standard time signature. In that case, 3 beats per measure quarter note gets the beat is 3/4, 4 beats per measure quarter note gets the beat is 4/4.


in /8 time, the dotted crotchet gets the beat (dotted quarter note.) In 6/8, there are two pulses. In 9/8, there are 3. And so forth.


Yes, you can fit the same amount of rhythm in there. The beat is divided/played differently. Most nondrummers have no idea what the hell I mean by that. But they are technically very different.

In 5/4, you can fit 10 eighth notes obviously (or 5 quarter notes). And you could connect the eight notes by twos, because the quarter note gets the beat.
In 5/8, you can fit 5 eighth notes obviously. You would connect them by a 3 and then by 2, or by 2 and then 3. Because they are divided into dotted quarter notes (which is the real pulse), and not straight notes like the 4th graded instructor told you. Eighth notes do not get the beat.


Im pretty sure I spelt eighth wrong a lot of times. But you should get the idea.
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#8
ya you hit in on the head....i hate when my friends try to play some of my sheet music and go "**** this time sig. just play it in whatever/4
#9
Playing 5/8 instead of 5/4 is like a shredder on a Les Paul. It's possible but not ideal.
There are differences in feel.
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#11
Quote by UtBDan
no, this is a very common misconception. This is what 4th grade band instructors tell people so that they can understand things in /8 time, but that's not it.


There are two types of time signatures: simple and compound. Anything /4 is simple.

3/4, 4/4, bla bla bla, you get it. Its the standard time signature. In that case, 3 beats per measure quarter note gets the beat is 3/4, 4 beats per measure quarter note gets the beat is 4/4.


in /8 time, the dotted crotchet gets the beat (dotted quarter note.) In 6/8, there are two pulses. In 9/8, there are 3. And so forth.


Yes, you can fit the same amount of rhythm in there. The beat is divided/played differently. Most nondrummers have no idea what the hell I mean by that. But they are technically very different.

In 5/4, you can fit 10 eighth notes obviously (or 5 quarter notes). And you could connect the eight notes by twos, because the quarter note gets the beat.
In 5/8, you can fit 5 eighth notes obviously. You would connect them by a 3 and then by 2, or by 2 and then 3. Because they are divided into dotted quarter notes (which is the real pulse), and not straight notes like the 4th graded instructor told you. Eighth notes do not get the beat.


Im pretty sure I spelt eighth wrong a lot of times. But you should get the idea.


Good post man
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#12
Quote by PinkFloyd73
its hard to explain to you right now...just how a 6/8 can't become a 3/4 very well.
The reason this is hard to explain is because it's impossible for 6/8 to become 3/4, at least without changing the entire feel of the rhythm.

6/8 is a compound time signature and represents two beats per measure.

3/4 is a simple time signature and represents three beats per measure.

If ever there were a topic that perplexes my students every single time, it's understanding and hearing the differences between simple and compound time.
All things are difficult before they are easy.
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#13
Quote by UtBDan
no, this is a very common misconception. This is what 4th grade band instructors tell people so that they can understand things in /8 time, but that's not it.

There are two types of time signatures: simple and compound. Anything /4 is simple.

3/4, 4/4, bla bla bla, you get it. Its the standard time signature. In that case, 3 beats per measure quarter note gets the beat is 3/4, 4 beats per measure quarter note gets the beat is 4/4.

in /8 time, the dotted crotchet gets the beat (dotted quarter note.) In 6/8, there are two pulses. In 9/8, there are 3. And so forth.

Yes, you can fit the same amount of rhythm in there. The beat is divided/played differently. Most nondrummers have no idea what the hell I mean by that. But they are technically very different.

In 5/4, you can fit 10 eighth notes obviously (or 5 quarter notes). And you could connect the eight notes by twos, because the quarter note gets the beat.
In 5/8, you can fit 5 eighth notes obviously. You would connect them by a 3 and then by 2, or by 2 and then 3. Because they are divided into dotted quarter notes (which is the real pulse), and not straight notes like the 4th graded instructor told you. Eighth notes do not get the beat.

Im pretty sure I spelt eighth wrong a lot of times. But you should get the idea.

I'm still kinda confused, but I think I get it.