#3
the wood does sound better as it ages but wat the other guy said is also true
Guitars:
Ibanez IC300
Fender American Strat w/RioGrande texas specials

Amps:
Fender FM212R
a now broken tube amp

Quote by Gofishus
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#4
Some can but it depends on the quality of the guitar in the first place. Some acoustics yes because the wood dries etc.
#6
i knew that it does with a violin...but what about high end electric guitars??or acoustics??
#7
does with acoustics, i think it depends on the wood tho, dunno about electric guitars tho
#8
It pretty much does with all wooden acoustic instruments. I dont know how, but it has somthing to do with the wood vibrating over the years of playing. It doesnt make any noticable difference on electric guitars.
"Good and evil lay side by side as electric love penetrates the sky"
#9
good acoustics get better with age. usually depends on wood material though. everyone knows that agathis wouldnt get better with age but i know for sure mahogany is supposed to get better with age given that you take care of the instrument
#10
Yea, but along your parts wear out along too while your wood 'gets used to vibrating'

So replace your parts regularly! or it'd just sound the same or worse.
#11
Yes, it's true. As the wood gets older and the more it gets played, the more the wood will vibrate, and the more it will want to vibrate. As the years pass, it will eventually start vibrating as much is can, and you get the full effects of the characteristics of the wood. It has nothing to do with the wood drying, or whether or not the wood is agathis or mahogany. Agathis is just as good as mahogany.

This applies to ALL wooden instruments, acoustic or electric.

Chris
'Aim at perfection in everything, though in most things it is unattainable. However, they who aim at it, and persevere, will come much nearer to it than those whose despondency and laziness make them give it up as unattainable.'