#1
Alright, so I recently got a new bass and planned to defret and repaint my old Squier P-Bass. Problem is, I heard a bunch of mixed comments about such and need some explainations on what should be done.

Here's what I have to work with.


^Headstock and fretboard


^Body with pickups removed and all (sorry it may be somewhat dark, and the color is blue)

Now with the defretting, I've heard to lightly touch the frets with a soldering iron to melt the glue somewhat. Which doesn't make sense if you can only touch the top of the fret? And why do you have to sand the fingerboard down after removing the frets? If necessary then what type of finish should I reapply to the fingerboard? Also, what should I use to fill the fret holes? Wood filler seems easy and reliable.

I have no idea how to paint it all over again. I was thinking a certain shade of a dark red with a black pickguard? How would I go about doing this starting from stripping the original paint off?

Any help would be wonderful!
#2
use wood filler for the fret slots, and use a lighter color filler than the rosewood, that way youll have an idea where the frets are. I think the sanding comes in after the filling, but you made it sound the other way around.
#3
i've never defretted anything. but my buddy did it to his OLP. and put a nordstrand in it. he say he never has to buy another bass now, because he has that and a warwick thumb.

BTW he told me defretting is a total pain in the sphincter.
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#4
Check my thread and see how I done it. Use wood as the filler so it looks nice Dont be cheap and use pine tho
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#5
Coated fingerboards and Uncoated ones sound different.

I would reccomend either using Polyurethane varnish, OR 2/3 part epoxy. The latter is harder to apply IMO, and wearing a mask is more important for it(I think breathing epoxy fumes is really bad)

OR, you could just oil the fingerboard and leave it at that(just be aware that if you use roundwounds on a uncoated fingerboard, it will wear faster)

Thats why Jaco use a fretted bass to practice on a lot and used the fretless for shows
#7
Here's a very good guide for defretting a bass:
http://www.geocities.com/charlesarms/

now with the defretting, I've heard to lightly touch the frets with a soldering iron to melt the glue somewhat. Which doesn't make sense if you can only touch the top of the fret? And why do you have to sand the fingerboard down after removing the frets? If necessary then what type of finish should I reapply to the fingerboard? Also, what should I use to fill the fret holes? Wood filler seems easy and reliable.

The fretwire is metal which conducts heat, so the bottom part will heat up aswell.
You sand the fingerboard after removing because it'll be rough... you'll see
You've got a rosewood fretboard so you don't need to finish it.
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#8
Alright thanks for the help everyone. I've already removed all the frets with no chips or anything, just the obvious amount of splinters. It's so satisfying haha. Now I'm off to sand it down. I'll post later.
#9
fill the fretwire gaps with a light colored wood, that way it will look as if you still have frets so you know where to press for the correct notes and its fretless, it looks better anyway IMO


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