#1
ok what advantages does a guitar have with a neck thru over a bolt on neck, does it help tuning anyway , does it give it better sound,

any info would be gratefull thanks..
#2
Besides the huge difference in price....

Neck thru's generally have better sustain, better tone, and more playing comfort. Some people prefer the feel of bolt ons, but I think neck thrus are better. They are pretty much impossible to repair however, so they should be treated carefully.

Also, noone's going to make a shitty guitar with a thru neck, but pretty much every shitty guitar has a bolt on
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#3
The only real advantages that neck throughs have over bolt on necks is that they offer more sustain, and they bring out the characteristics of the neck wood more than the body wood. Although, if you ever smack the headstock on something, and break it you're forced to either attempt to glue it back or scrap the whole guitar. Bolt ons offer the ease of replacing the neck.

Chris
'Aim at perfection in everything, though in most things it is unattainable. However, they who aim at it, and persevere, will come much nearer to it than those whose despondency and laziness make them give it up as unattainable.'
#4
Neck throughs normally give you a little more sustain and give you better access to the upper frets. Bolt ons are good because if you have to you can change out the neck, as with a neck through or set neck if your neck gets messed up you'll have to get a new guitar.
apparently UG's only type O-


Quote by Strike9

Thanks jb_designs.
#5
ok thanks for the quick reply's. i don't think i will go buy a neck thru guitar then.. never thought about if the neck breaks, guitar would be useless... will stick with my bolt on guitar...

thanks..
#6
Quote by hamish5178
Besides the huge difference in price....

Neck thru's generally have better sustain, better tone, and more playing comfort. Some people prefer the feel of bolt ons, but I think neck thrus are better. They are pretty much impossible to repair however, so they should be treated carefully.

Also, noone's going to make a shitty guitar with a thru neck, but pretty much every shitty guitar has a bolt on

Although I agree with the rest of your post, 'better tone' is completely subjective, and not true of the characteristics of neck-throughs.

Chris
'Aim at perfection in everything, though in most things it is unattainable. However, they who aim at it, and persevere, will come much nearer to it than those whose despondency and laziness make them give it up as unattainable.'
#7
i think that bolt on necks give a brighter tone too, while set/thru-necks have a warmer tone.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#8
Quote by hamish5178

Also, noone's going to make a shitty guitar with a thru neck, but pretty much every shitty guitar has a bolt on



shitty? fender's and SOME ESP has bolt on and they sound f**king awesome
#9
Quote by BirdHouse
shitty? fender's and SOME ESP has bolt on and they sound f**king awesome

he didn't mean all guitars that have bolt on necks are shitty, he meant all shitty guitars will have bolt on necks.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#10
Quote by Blompcube
i think that bolt on necks give a brighter tone too, while set/thru-necks have a warmer tone.

That totally depends on the woods used.

Chris
'Aim at perfection in everything, though in most things it is unattainable. However, they who aim at it, and persevere, will come much nearer to it than those whose despondency and laziness make them give it up as unattainable.'
#11
Quote by AlGeeEater
Although I agree with the rest of your post, 'better tone' is completely subjective, and not true of the characteristics of neck-throughs.

Chris



lol, I understand, I just prefer the bassier tone of neck thrus, so I call it better


Quote by BirdHouse
shitty? fender's and SOME ESP has bolt on and they sound f**king awesome


umm, reread my post.

I didn't say all bolt ons were shitty, I said all shitty guitars have bolt on necks (or most of them anyway)
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#13
Quote by Punk_Ninja
If you get a neck thru guitar don't you pretty much only have mahogany or maple as the body, the wings dont do much to the tone I've heard.



what is your question? I'm confused

usually neckthrough guitars don't have wood combinations if thats what you mean, they usually won't have a maple top and a mahogany back, rather they'd just be solid mahogany.

and chris, if you have two guitars made of the same wood, one a bolt on, one a thru neck, the thru neck will have a darker bassier tone. Or at least that's what i've been taught, and its what ive heard.
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Sunface w/ SunDial
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Epic win. He speaks the truth, boys and girls.



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#14
I think what kind bridge the guitar has, ie string through body or stop bar, has about as much to do with sustain as whether or not the neck is bolt on or screwed on. I don't agree that the neck preference has anything whatsoever to do with the tone. for example, I have a Fender Lonestar Strat and a Gibson Les Paul Standard. the Fender has single coils, lighter wood, and is thinner whereas the Gibson has humbuckers, heavier wood, and is alotogether about 2.5 pounds heavier and thicker. THAT is the difference in tone. I don't prefer one over the other because of how the neck is on the guitar. the size and angle of the neck determines it's playability. I've not seen any noticeable difference in the 2 other than the setneck "looks more expensive".
#15
I was saying, maple neck or mahogany, which is also the wood which takes up most of the body, then there's wings of some other wood, which dont do much to tone so you basically choose maple or mahogany.
#16
Quote by jb_designs
as with a neck through or set neck if your neck gets messed up you'll have to get a new guitar.

Actually I've seen a guy repair a set neck, they have to carefully chisel out the old neck then reset a new one but it can be done.
#17
Quote by AlGeeEater
The only real advantages that neck throughs have over bolt on necks is that they offer more sustain, and they bring out the characteristics of the neck wood more than the body wood. Although, if you ever smack the headstock on something, and break it you're forced to either attempt to glue it back or scrap the whole guitar. Bolt ons offer the ease of replacing the neck.

Chris


+1

Sustain is really the only thing that's affected, as well as upper fret access. Without the neck pocket on the body and with normally a much better contour, upper frets are generally much easier to reach on a neck thru. And since the whole center of the body is essentially an extension of the neck (with small body wings glued to the sides), the neck material has a much bigger impact on the overall tone of the instrument than its body wing material.

Neck thru won't give your guitar a better tone. It will give it a different tone. Take 2 'identical' guitars like the ESP KH-2 bolt-on and KH-2 NT. Both guitars look the same. And to play, they both feel identical until you hit the upper frets. But the sound if COMPLTELY different. The KH-2 bolt-on has an alder body and produces the characteristic alder tone. The KH-2 NT has maple neck thru with alder body wings. Its sound is brighter, it has more pick attack, with a much more focused and tight low end that's typical of maple. Its alder body wings merely add a bit of coloration to the sound.

Now personally, I prefer a neck thru guitar over bolt-on. But in terms of quality, a good bolt-on guitar will piss all over a cheap neck thru. Neck joint is definately not a way to gauge the quality of a guitar.
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#18
id rather just use a set neck guitar, it has most of the advantes of a neck-thru but you can still replace the neck if it breaks (albiet its a bit difficult.)
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#19
The cost of replacing a set neck is pretty expensive since it involves a lot of work to remove the old neck and chisel its remains out of the neck pocket. The labour alone will run you several hundred dollars, not counting the price of the new neck and the shaping of the heel tenon (again, labour intensive). It's only really feasible if you have an expensive guitar like a Gibson or something. If your guitar is a sub-$1000 instrument, you're probably better off buying a new guitar than having it repaired.
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#20
its not that hard, ive removed a set neck before, it came out cleanly and required no chiseling at all.
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#21
You were fortunate. I've seen the necks removed off 2 different set neck gutiars to date (LTD EC-1000 and a Gibson Flying V), and it was a pain in the ass for the luthier both times. It required massive amounds of chiseling.
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#22
Quote by Crunchmeister
+1

Sustain is really the only thing that's affected, as well as upper fret access. Without the neck pocket on the body and with normally a much better contour, upper frets are generally much easier to reach on a neck thru. And since the whole center of the body is essentially an extension of the neck (with small body wings glued to the sides), the neck material has a much bigger impact on the overall tone of the instrument than its body wing material.

Neck thru won't give your guitar a better tone. It will give it a different tone. Take 2 'identical' guitars like the ESP KH-2 bolt-on and KH-2 NT. Both guitars look the same. And to play, they both feel identical until you hit the upper frets. But the sound if COMPLTELY different. The KH-2 bolt-on has an alder body and produces the characteristic alder tone. The KH-2 NT has maple neck thru with alder body wings. Its sound is brighter, it has more pick attack, with a much more focused and tight low end that's typical of maple. Its alder body wings merely add a bit of coloration to the sound.

Now personally, I prefer a neck thru guitar over bolt-on. But in terms of quality, a good bolt-on guitar will piss all over a cheap neck thru. Neck joint is definately not a way to gauge the quality of a guitar.



im not sure if they make a cheap neck thru :P haha ... but higher end bolt ons tend to have the body contoured for easy high fret access
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#23
Neck-thru's generally have the best upper fret access, but some bolt-ons like AANJ can still be good. Also like mentioned, with a bolt-on you get more of the body wood tone, while with a neck-thru you get more of the neck tone. As for which is better, I'd say it's preference.
I personally like neck-thrus and AANJ bolt-ons but I really dislike the traditional square joints.
#24
I prefer neck-thru over bolt on generally, but I like alot of bolt-on guitars as well.