#2
Get a roughly matchbox sized lump of wood and ram it in between the inertia bar (the bit you put the strings through) and the body. Clapton also puts five springs in the back, and tightens the anchor plate right up to the body. NOTE: For that bit you will have to make sure the added tension is balanced up by the strings and the truss rod.
Feel free to ignore my ranting.

Member of the Self-Taught Club.

A recent study shows that 8% of teenagers listen to nothing but music with guitars in it. Put this in your sig if you're one of the 92% who isn't a close-minded moron.
#3
Yep, if you don't have experience with the truss rod etc., go to a specialist. If you have reasonable experience, first take 5 springs (you most likely have 3 now, so get another two) and attach them. Than you must screw the two big screws in untill the bridge is completely flush with the body. You will need to adjust your truss rod to get normal action and get a good angle, but the things that need to have the most adjustment are the saddles. They need to be raised if the rear end of your bridge was pointing upward.

For extra sustain you can put a piece of wood between the metal part of the tremolo and the walls of the cavity.
Gear:
Gibson les paul Studio faded, modded Buckethead style (killswitch, 1 tone, 1 vol)
Taylor Big Baby 306-GB
Modded Cort KX-5, runaway (neck) and warthog (bridge)
Laney VC-15
Digitech Bad Monkey, EH Big Muff, crybaby JH-1
#4
^^The piece of wood also provides additional tuning stability.
Feel free to ignore my ranting.

Member of the Self-Taught Club.

A recent study shows that 8% of teenagers listen to nothing but music with guitars in it. Put this in your sig if you're one of the 92% who isn't a close-minded moron.
#5
I always thaught Clapton had an actual trem block put in when they made them.

You acn either use a block of wood, that you cut yourself and save some money. Or you can buy a trem block and go that way.