#1
I've been practicing with a metronome for about a month every day and I'm getting a lot better, faster and cleaner (where before I struggled)!!!
I do the 1234 exercise, then I do the trem picking with accents exercise, but I don't have anything for practicing triplets! I like the sound of triplets a lot and I like most players that use them... What exercise(s) do you suggest? I cannot use an ordinary scale or a mode because they have some or more strings with 2 notes per string and desynchronize my rythm.
Also I have another question. I'm quite intrested in musical modes, but I can't fully understand what they are and how they are useful. Like, I thought that they were the corrisponding scales of the C Major scale all over the fretboard... Like if I wanted a G major scale I should play a mixolydian mode on the 3rd fret, or if I wanted an E major scale i should play a Phrygian mode on 12th or open string and it should sound the same... but it doesn't because the intervals are different and so i'm a bit puzzled. How should these modes be used then?

Sorry for the long post thanks.
#2
Just play 3 notes per string, and one string per beat/metronome click. Not too sure about modes, though
My gear;

Custom HSS Strat (eBay'ed parts)
Fender Acoustic
DOD EQ
EH Big Muff
Home-made Wah
Home-made Booster
Laney LC15

Looking for a Jazz Bass body to refinish

My DeviantArt Page, MySpace Profile
#4
Learn the modes in 3 note per string patterns.
It easier to pick them because they have odd number of notes per string and the picking pattern is the same all the time.
Just google it .
#5
I do already but most modes have 3 notes per string and one or two strings with 2 notes per string. What do you exactly mean? thanks.
#6
Triplets: You CAN play ordinary scales to practice triplets. Just play the scales so there are 3 notes per string. It wont be in the "box pattern" of the scale which is actually a good thing so you won't get in the habit of playing boxes, you will play the notes.


Modes: You have learned wrong. Please, forget everything you know about modes (besides the names of them).

You said if you wanted to play the E Major scale you should play E phrygian. The major scale is equal to the Ionian mode. If you want to play the E Major scale then play E Ionian. By playing E Phrygian you are playing in the Key of C (when it should be the key of E).

Modes are the same notes of the major scale just in a different order, and contain different intervals.
C ionian=C D E F G A B
D dorian=D E F G A B C
E phrygian=E F G A B C D

You can see that E phyrgian is not the same as E major (ionian) which is : E, F#, G#, A, B, C#, D#.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#7
Triplets is just practicing keeping in time...

So play in 4/4 time, probably at 120bpm. Play one quaver triplet for each beat. That is, for each beat, fit three notes in; but keep it even. You should be playing 12 notes with four full beats, equally spaced. You can choose what notes you wanna play... maybe frets 1 2 3 on each string.
#8
Thanks a lot metal4all!!!!!!

So to play E major scale (Ionian) i should go to the 12th or open string and play Ionian. Then as far as I've understood the modes are just a way to move up or down the fretboard while keeping the key, a bit like the different pentatonic boxes... Like now being at the 12th fret Ionian mode I could go up to the 9th and play Aeolian mode, or to the 7th and play Mixolydian, and still stay in the key of E major. Is that correct?? Thank you very much
#10
You can play all around the fretboard and stay in key (just play the notes in the key).

Modes are very important for improvising. Each mode has it's own set of intervals. Yes the notes are the same (just a different order) but the intervals are absolutely different.

IONIAN - 0 sharps, 0 flats - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
DORIAN - 2 flats - 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7
PHRYGIAN - 4 flats - 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
LYDIAN - 1 sharp - 1 2 3 #4 5 6 7
MIXOLYDIAN - 1 flat - 1 2 3 4 5 6 b7
AEOLIAN - 3 flats - 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
LOCRIAN - 5 flats - 1 b2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7

All of those different intervals will bring a different feeling to the song (even though they are the same notes).

You don't have to go all the way to the 12th fret to play E Ionian. 14th fret D string is the note E, all you have to do is play the notes in order starting with the root note (in this case, "E") and you can play the scale anywhere.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#11
Thanks for explaining... But I still have some doubts. If I can play all over the fretbard keeping the notes in the key... How do the modes work? Like the mode is a different position on the neck which has the same notes as the Ionian scale, but a different feel because of the different intervals (needed to make the same notes starting at a different position on the neck)? and those sharps and flats... they refer to the alterations to be made on the notes of the original Ionian mode to create the new mode? Correct?
Thank you very much
#12
Quote by -Freebird-
and those sharps and flats... they refer to the alterations to be made on the notes of the original Ionian mode to create the new mode? Correct?
Thank you very much

That is absolutely correct. I wish i would have understood that as quick as you did when i learned this stuff.


EDIT:
Quote by -Freebird-
If I can play all over the fretbard keeping the notes in the key... How do the modes work?


Modes are important for improvising. All those intervals will help bring out the chords you are playing over. By knowing those intervals and the modes you can play over a chord progression and basically know what your playing is going to sound like before you even play over it (which is a very great thing for improvising).

I didnt understand where you tried to explain this question though?
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
Last edited by metal4all at Jan 6, 2007,
#13
Metal4all got the modes right, as for triplets... Whol told you you have to play triplets strictly in 3 notes per string patterns?
Jackson DKMG & KE3, Fender Mexican Strat, Stagg Acoustic

Boss Compressor & Chorus, Dunlop Crybaby, Behringer Delay, ISP Decimator, Ibanez Tubescreamer

Laney TT50H, Marshall 1960A, Roland Cube 15

Looking to jam in Belfast, PM me!
#15
^well yes, but i think ar73m was hinting that, you can play triplets with any scale. two notes per string, 4 notes per string...it doesnt have to be 3 notes per string scale
#16
Yeah, don't confuse triplets with any particular finger pattern. It's something you
can and should be able to play with any notes really.

For instance in a pattern that's like 1-2-3, it's going to seem fairly easy to do triplets
because it easily goes with the fingering. For a 1-2-3-4 pattern it's still not that
hard to do triplets. Feel the rythym of it going through those four notes. It will feel
more "twisty-turny" as the 3 note beat cycles through a 4 note pattern.

Edit: I should say it WILL feel hard at first, but becomes easier over time. You might
want to think about it like this: Rather than think of it as triplets, think of it as notes
that you're playing at a speed between 8th notes and 16th notes. You just need to
get a feel for that particular speed over the beat.
Last edited by edg at Jan 6, 2007,
#17
Yes I never understood how to play 16th note triplets. So they're in 6/8, basically they're 2 triplets put together... And they overlap with the 4/4 beat on the 12th note I understand. I found out I also have a 6/8 mode on my metronome, i'll start that out.

and Metal4all you have been SO HELPFUL! Thanks a lot. I think I've grasped those modes!!

Thanks to everyone else also.
#18
Quote by -Freebird-
Yes I never understood how to play 16th note triplets. So they're in 6/8, basically they're 2 triplets put together... And they overlap with the 4/4 beat on the 12th note I understand. I found out I also have a 6/8 mode on my metronome, i'll start that out.


A 16th note triplet simply means you play 6 notes per one click of the metronome, so 24 notes per beat if you're playing in 4/4. Not that complicated, though it does get hard to keep track of them at first. In fact, I don't dare doing any complicated fingers beyond like 60, maybe 80 bpm with 16th triplets as of yet, personally. :p

EDIT: by the way, if I were you I'd steer clear of settings like 6/8 or whatever on your metronome. First and foremost, make sure you are really comfortable with every common note subdivision in 4/4 - I'd say do everything all the way up to 32th notes; then it'll be easier to play in any other time, AND you'll have a very solid sense of time without much need for outside references like metronome clicking.
Jackson DKMG & KE3, Fender Mexican Strat, Stagg Acoustic

Boss Compressor & Chorus, Dunlop Crybaby, Behringer Delay, ISP Decimator, Ibanez Tubescreamer

Laney TT50H, Marshall 1960A, Roland Cube 15

Looking to jam in Belfast, PM me!
Last edited by ar73m at Jan 6, 2007,
#19
Quote by -Freebird-
Yes I never understood how to play 16th note triplets. So they're in 6/8, basically they're 2 triplets put together... And they overlap with the 4/4 beat on the 12th note I understand. I found out I also have a 6/8 mode on my metronome, i'll start that out.

and Metal4all you have been SO HELPFUL! Thanks a lot. I think I've grasped those modes!!

Thanks to everyone else also.

No problem dude, thats what this forums for.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥