#1
ok i am the substitute teacher at the local music shop. all the teaching staff for guitar is taking theory knowledge quiz. the owner said that it's supposed to be hard so don't worry about doing badly. i want to do as well as possible; there are two things bugging me about it though.

1. what does it mean when you have a chord like X/Xm (replace x with note of the scale) i know that you can have X/X and whatever is on the right of the slash is the bass note, but if it's just one note how can it be minor?


2. what do the numbers in time signatures mean? i know what both of them mean together, but what do the top and bottom numbers mean individually?
Quote by cheames
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#2
Im not sure about the first one, sorry.
But for time signatures, the top number is beats in a measure, and the bottom number is what note gets the beat (4 = quarter note, 8 = eighth, 2 = half note etc etc). So 4/4 would be four beats a measure, with quarter notes as the beats.
#3
^that was a bad example sorry (the numbers were the same). If it were 3/4, it would be three beats in a measure, where a quarter note gets the beat.
#4
the chord thing would be the Xm chord played with X as the bass note
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#5
yea umm...the first question...i have no idea what ur talking about. for the second one though, a time signature like 4/4 means that there are 4 beats in a measure and a quarter note gets one beat...therefore 4 quarter notes = 1 measure (in this specific time signature) (the top number = beats per measure...the bottom number is the type of note that gets one beat) (2=half note, 4=quarter note...basically for the bottom number just put a one over it to figure out what kind of note it is nd thats the type of note that gets one beat)
#6
For the first one do you mean something like G/Em?

If so. . .then it's an Em chord with G in the bass (lowest note). It's just an inverted chord (chord with notes not in order). If not, then I don't know what you're talking about.
#7
Quote by R0CKER1220
For the first one do you mean something like G/Em?

If so. . .then it's an Em chord with G in the bass (lowest note). It's just an inverted chord (chord with notes not in order). If not, then I don't know what you're talking about.



hey it's better than what i was thinking. i haven't ever seen that so i was hoping maybe someone had.
Quote by cheames
neither is great. The Fender is bad though, unlike the Behringer which sounds so bad that it makes you want to stab out your own eardrums with a blunt pencil . hope that was helpful.


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#8
Quote by mercyballer34
yea umm...the first question...i have no idea what ur talking about. for the second one though, a time signature like 4/4 means that there are 4 beats in a measure and a quarter note gets one beat...therefore 4 quarter notes = 1 measure (in this specific time signature) (the top number = beats per measure...the bottom number is the type of note that gets one beat) (2=half note, 4=quarter note...basically for the bottom number just put a one over it to figure out what kind of note it is nd thats the type of note that gets one beat)


I think it's just easier to say that the bottom number tells how many beats a quarter note gets. Example: in 6/8 time, a quarter note gets two beats and in 3/4, a quarter note gets one beat.
Signatures are too mainstream
#9
And I think an Em/G is a Em with G as a bass note because obviously there are plenty of ways to play an Em. One of them has to have a bass note G.
Signatures are too mainstream
#10
Quote by R0CKER1220
For the first one do you mean something like G/Em?

If so. . .then it's an Em chord with G in the bass (lowest note). It's just an inverted chord (chord with notes not in order). If not, then I don't know what you're talking about.


Seems like a good thought, I normally hear Em/G which would be Em with the G bass, but inverted would be G/Em which would be the same.
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#11
Quote by diverdown04
I think it's just easier to say that the bottom number tells how many beats a quarter note gets. Example: in 6/8 time, a quarter note gets two beats and in 3/4, a quarter note gets one beat.

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

in 6/8 time the beat is a dotted quarter note. so a quarter note is actually a third of a beat. 6/8 is compound time, so the rules for simple time do not apply. im tired so i dont feel like explaining it, so just search for compound time in the search function and you should find a couple well written descriptions of it.
#12
here is an Example of the "/" chord you were referring to...

F/Dm
e-----
B--3--
G--2--
D--0--
A-----
E--1--

or

G/Bm

e-----
B--3--
G--4--
D--4--
A-----
E--3--

F#/A

e-----
B--2--
G--2--
D--2--
A--0--
E--2--

as you can see, the first note name is the "bass" note so to speak and the 2nd is the chord.
#13
Quote by jof1029
NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

in 6/8 time the beat is a dotted quarter note. so a quarter note is actually a third of a beat. 6/8 is compound time, so the rules for simple time do not apply. im tired so i dont feel like explaining it, so just search for compound time in the search function and you should find a couple well written descriptions of it.


This should be quite a good description of compound time:

Two defining characteristics of compound time are...
1. The upper number is larger than three and is evenly divisible by three. The most common compound time numerators are 6, 9, 12 and 15. We must divide the upper number by three to determine the number of beats per measure.
2. Each beat in compound time naturally divides into three parts, and the lower number indicates the beat's natural division.

Here's how to interpret the compound time signature 12/8.
* Divide the upper number (12) by three to determine the number of beats per measure: 12 / 3 = 4 beats per measure.
* Each beat naturally divides into three eighth (8) notes.

Originally posted by gpb0216 here:

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=489760&highlight=theory+onslaught
#14
Quote by OldSong
This should be quite a good description of compound time:

Two defining characteristics of compound time are...
1. The upper number is larger than three and is evenly divisible by three. The most common compound time numerators are 6, 9, 12 and 15. We must divide the upper number by three to determine the number of beats per measure.
2. Each beat in compound time naturally divides into three parts, and the lower number indicates the beat's natural division.

Here's how to interpret the compound time signature 12/8.
* Divide the upper number (12) by three to determine the number of beats per measure: 12 / 3 = 4 beats per measure.
* Each beat naturally divides into three eighth (8) notes.

Originally posted by gpb0216 here:

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=489760&highlight=theory+onslaught



thanks a lot, but just simple answer of what the top and bottom numbers in 4/4 mean will do. so what i have gathered is that those "/" chords are just inverted, and that the top number is the beats per measure, and the bottom number is what kind of note gets a beat. will that be correct on the quiz?
Quote by cheames
neither is great. The Fender is bad though, unlike the Behringer which sounds so bad that it makes you want to stab out your own eardrums with a blunt pencil . hope that was helpful.


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#15
Oh shoot, my bad. jof1029 is right. A beat in 6/8 is a dotted quarter note. Not so sure how you figured out 1/3 of a beat, I was thinking 2/3 but, yeah that's right.
Signatures are too mainstream
#17
Quote by diverdown04
Oh shoot, my bad. jof1029 is right. A beat in 6/8 is a dotted quarter note. Not so sure how you figured out 1/3 of a beat, I was thinking 2/3 but, yeah that's right.

i was thinking that an eighth note is 1/3 of a beat
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