#1
Well, I've been playing bass for a year now. As my abilities have expanded and I am playing faster riffs and more complicated lines which means more work for my left hand, that I fret with. When I play my hand gets sore pretty quickly. I can feel pain in my hand and my finger dexterity suffers.

I was wondering if maybe this is natural, and I will just grow out of it. Maybe my hand is too weak, or maybe I am holding the bass wrong. I've checked some info on proper hand positions and I am pretty sure I am doing it right. Thanks for the help.
#3
If you fingers and hand are REALLY sore, give em a 3 day rest, so they have time to heal. If you just keep playing and playing, not only will they always be sore, but you could possibly do some damage,

Because, when they get sore, it means you have stretched and torn muscles (like body builders do). Which isn't a bad thing, as that is the only wat they will become stronger, it just means you should give them sufficient time to repair.

Hope this helps
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#4
This is normal, but when your hand starts to hurt, it's time to take a break. You just need some time for your fingers to strengthen.

It's important to take breaks if you feel strain in you hands, if you don't you could injure your hand.
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#5
Play without your thumb on the neck when you warm up and whenever possible. When you go back in a couple of months, you'll be able to play all day long
#7
No, it's called the floating technique which is good for 8+ strings so you can skip strings easier.
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#8
I've heard the thumb off the neck technique is a good way to practice not relying on the thumb for pushing the strings down on the fretboard....but technically yes having your thumb off the neck is bad technique.

Edit:The guy/girl above me beat me to posting. So I guess it isn't bad technique unless you're playing on a 4 string bass.
#10
Quote by Greenday389
No, it's called the floating technique which is good for 8+ strings so you can skip strings easier.


Well when he gets an 8 string he can do it but for now when he has a 4,5, or 6 string he can keep his thumb on the neck.
#11
Unless he likes uneven volume on hitting the strings. I admit I did that by the neck and my teacher told me I'd get a more constant volume by anchoring. So now I anchor on the middle pickup.
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#14
Technique doesn't mean anything, as long as you can play. Even Geddy takes his thumb off the neck and hooks it over the fretboard a little sometimes - so does Justin Chancellor, so did Cliff Burton. Play the way it suits you.
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#15
But technique is important. I'm sure they do it out of neccessity. There are certain times when exceptions to technique applies but generally good technique is usually just that good.
Quote by Greenday389

I wasn't talking about the pickup.

Well what the hell were you talking about then here:

Quote by Greenday389
So now I anchor on the middle pickup.
#16
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
But technique is important. I'm sure they do it out of neccessity. There are certain times when exceptions to technique applies but generally good technique is usually just that good.

Well what the hell were you talking about then here:



I was saying that when I started out on bass I didn't anchor my thumb.

Then one day my teacher was recording me and said my signal had uneven volume because I didn't anchore. So I tryed anchoring my thumb on the middle pickup which made my volume consistant.
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#17
Thanks for the help. But Greenday389, how would anchoring the thumb of my right hand help my left hand? It's my fretting hand that I'm having the problems with.

But you've all been very helpful. I'll just take more time for my hand to rest in between sessions. I practice every day for a long time sometimes, so I'm probably just wearing my hand down. I'll just apply some weightlifting principals and give my hand muscles a rest.

Thanks for the help. I probably wouldn't even be playing bass right now if it wasn't for the bass forum.
#18
Quote by Niff
Technique doesn't mean anything, as long as you can play. Even Geddy takes his thumb off the neck and hooks it over the fretboard a little sometimes - so does Justin Chancellor, so did Cliff Burton. Play the way it suits you.


Technique is important, it's what give you a better sound, and without proper technique you could end up seriously injuring your hands.
Like jazz_rock_feel said, these are probably exceptions.

I've seen Geddy play quite a few times, and lemme tell ya, he's got great technique.
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#19
Quote by FaceTheBass
Thanks for the help. But Greenday389, how would anchoring the thumb of my right hand help my left hand? It's my fretting hand that I'm having the problems with.

But you've all been very helpful. I'll just take more time for my hand to rest in between sessions. I practice every day for a long time sometimes, so I'm probably just wearing my hand down. I'll just apply some weightlifting principals and give my hand muscles a rest.

Thanks for the help. I probably wouldn't even be playing bass right now if it wasn't for the bass forum.


Oh, sorry. Usualy when someone talks about there thumb, I think they are talking about their right hand(if they are right handed).

I must have overlooked the part where you said your LEFT had hurt.
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#20
Hi. Recently, I got myself a Gibson Tribute, which has narrower and smaller frets than my other guitars, especially my tele. It was sort of imapiring my ability to play fast, I was using more force against the fretboard. So I decided that I should get used to it. I started to play more hours, but it wasn't helping. First my pinky would tremble for some minutes after practicing...  Then one day I ended up going past the point of muscle stress, still I kept playing and my left  hand got weak and soft, as if I had lifted weights with it, so I was forced to stop. The following days I took a break... After one week without playing, I picked it up for half an hour, did some stretches before and started to play whatever.... my hand was still in pain and fatigue. I went to a doctor, but  the ultrassound showed no damage to the tendons, so he discarded tendonitis and suggested that I took a break for a couple more weeks. So I did, I rested almost completely for another week. The thing is, now, whenever I play for more than 20 minutes, my hands get really tired, really fatigued, to the point I need to stop playing - it's really frustrating. I've been playing blues only. This happens specially on relatively fast scales (I'm ok with bending). Anyways, how longer should I stay away from the guitar? Is there anything else I could do? Has it happened to anyone of you? I really need some advice.
Last edited by mucky.fingers at May 22, 2017,