#1
Ok guys, its official, I'm a noob haha.

I have lots of questions but my real question is........ "To strum or not to strum"

What do I mean? Well, lets say you have a "D" Chord


I'm not suppose to strum on E and A but should I not strum it or mute it with my thumbs?

Because I'm a noob, I usually do both, try to hit only D, G, B and e while at the same time, I mute E and A with my thumb since I strum it anyways. Hehe

What do you guys suggest I should do? Practice hundreds of times until I get it perfectly and not hit E and A or is muting ok?
#2
You seem to enjoy too much the fact of being a noob...
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#3
just do the 4 strings, e, b, g, d, try not to mute but, if your new that might be difficult
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#4
mute the other strings, it makes a little different sound and will look better with your arm swinging rather than anchored there
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#5
hitting the open A is fine, hitting the open E wont sound right, either dont strum the E or reach over and fret it at the second fret with your thumb.
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#7
Quote by real_québécois
You seem to enjoy too much the fact of being a noob...


a noob to me does not have anything offensive. Besides, Im new to playing the guitar so its ok. Noone in this world was never a noob.
#8
Quote by Kid_Thorazine
hitting the open A is fine, hitting the open E wont sound right, either dont strum the E or reach over and fret it at the second fret with your thumb.


Ye thats what I usually do and mute both with my thumb but this causes my fretting on the D Chords to be a little off hehe.
#9
you dont need to mute the A it works as part of the chord, and dont mute the E use your thumb to fret it at the second fret or dont hitit at all.
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#11
I suppose it's a personal stylistic quirk. As long as it doesn't hold you back (in terms of how fast you stich chords and such) then I don't see a problem with the muting habit.
#12
it doesn't really matter. you can mute it or just strum the 4 or 5 strings (depending if you want a in there)
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#15
As a beginner it may be helpful to practice strumming all your open chords and aiming at the 4th string as your point of contact. There are three reasons why this works:

1. It gets around strings that need to be muted.
2. It mellows out your strumming by eliminating the harsh bass response.
3. The chords containing notes in the omited strings will still sound correct.

As you become more comfortable with the chords, you can vary your point of contact for different chords. For example: chords such as G, E and Em will sound better if you contact the strings at the 6th string. When I play those chords I conciously make a note to use their bass response to add variety to my playing.

While muting is a more precise method, it can be distracting. I think it's more important to focus on keeping your rhythm steady and switching chords at the right time. It's really up to you because every guitarist has his/her own style.

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#16
Quote by Armored Artist
As a beginner it may be helpful to practice strumming all your open chords and aiming at the 4th string as your point of contact. There are three reasons why this works:

1. It gets around strings that need to be muted.
2. It mellows out your strumming by eliminating the harsh bass response.
3. The chords containing notes in the omited strings will still sound correct.

As you become more comfortable with the chords, you can vary your point of contact for different chords. For example: chords such as G, E and Em will sound better if you contact the strings at the 6th string. When I play those chords I conciously make a note to use their bass response to add variety to my playing.

While muting is a more precise method, it can be distracting. I think it's more important to focus on keeping your rhythm steady and switching chords at the right time. It's really up to you because every guitarist has his/her own style.


Thanks, actually that was a good advice there. Im gonna try that tomorrow in the meantime, I have to go to bed.

Goodnight guys!