#1
Hi Guys,
I've been playing guitar (electric) for years but have only started to play it a lot in the last year or so. One problem that I have always had is with barre chords, I can't ever seem to find a finger position where I'm not muting at least one string with the my barre finger. When I play normal E or A shapes it's not really a problem because my other fingers are on the middle strings (and with A shapes I purposely have my bar finger in a position that mutes the E string anyway), but it is a problem with chords where one of the middle strings is held with the barre finger (eg. E minor/seventh or A seventh shapes). I have tried moving my bar finger into heaps of different orientations but I still can never get all strings to ring. Has anyone got any tips for me?
#3
It's all about finding your sweet spots on your finger. Really it's a question of technique. Try and bar all six strings with your first finger and make sure all strings are pressed down. The play each string and let it ring and they should all be able to ring together. When you've got that down, move on to the same practice with your second, third and fourth finger.
#4
Hi RS250. one suggestion i have found helpful, besides practice, practice, practice
is to kind of relax and let gravity pull your hand down and not press so hard against the strings with the finger. it has seemed to help some in fixing some of the muted strings i was getting. ... or its the practice
Epiphone Les Paul Prophecy GX
Epiphone Les Paul Ultra
Ibanez RG5ERX1
Fender MIM Telecaster
Fender Acoustic
Fender Supersonic Combo
Boss TU-2 / CS-3 / DD-20 / Vox Satchurator / Hardwire CR-7 / Vox Big Bad Wah / ISP Decimator G-String
#5
I use a lot more of the side of my finger than just right on the middle. It's helped my a lot but everyone's hand is different. Just experiment and find what works best for you.
Signatures are too mainstream
#6
Use the right side of your index for general barre, ring for A and D, and middle for G.

WHAT HAVE YOU DONE
#7
Thanks for everyone's reply. I've been playing around with putting my finger in different positions across the fretboard but I can't seem to stop the string that is under the opposite side of the knuckle (where the finger curves at the join) from being muted. Pressing harder didn't seem to help at all. There doesn't seem to be much margin for error!
#8
Try extending the tip of your index finger over the low E string a bit, not resting on top of it. That may reorient it enough. Also make sure your thumb is opposite your middle finger and positioned in the middle of the neck.
Epiphone Les Paul Prophecy GX
Epiphone Les Paul Ultra
Ibanez RG5ERX1
Fender MIM Telecaster
Fender Acoustic
Fender Supersonic Combo
Boss TU-2 / CS-3 / DD-20 / Vox Satchurator / Hardwire CR-7 / Vox Big Bad Wah / ISP Decimator G-String
#9
not likeley but it might be your gitar if it has a slight curve on the fretboard then it could make barring harder also higher gauge strings would make barreing harder
Quote by Nosferatu Man

T-shirts are a sign of degeneration and decline.
#10
The guitar has a much lower action than other guitars I have played, would that make barring harder or easier?
#11
I remember that i learned "Octopus" by Syd Barrett and i got the barre chords down.
Just find a song you like with barre chords and learn it.
Donr worry youl master it.


Lower action makes barring much easier because you dont have to press down as much.
Last edited by Evil_Magician at Jan 10, 2007,
#12
Lower action helps a lot as has been said already, and I find that using the side of your finger makes it a lot easier too.