#1
i need help choosing pickups for my project its gonna have a humbucker in the neck, a single coil in the middle and a humbucker in the bridge

i play rock ranging from classic rock like jimi hendrix and the who, to punk like old green day and metal like metallica
preferably a good lead tone on the bridge and a good rhythm tone on the neck if thats really possible

so can u please name me a pickup for each position that would work
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#2
For the bridge get the dimebucker. Middle get some strat pickup, and for the Neck get a SH-8 Invader.
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#3
Hey, yeah, don't get thrown off by the Invader in the neck, it's not a bad idea. Invader neck p/u's have probably less than half of the impedance as the bridge ones and warm up really nice.
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#4
Bridge - SH-4 JB
Middle - dont know
Neck - SH '59
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#5
i'd say the dimebucker is more than he needs, for those styles its going to be overpowering, the invador, yes, that can cover the punk and metallica, but i'd suggest trying a range of pickups, and finding ones you like. failing that, go to themanufacturer's sites and listen to pickup's sound samples, they usually haveclean and distorted samples, so you can hear both, its not thebest method, but it can be useful. Also coil splits may be useful for the hendrix/classic rock tone, and offer more diversity to the guitar.


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#6
-1 to anyone who recommended the Dimebucker or the Invader, and -10 to anyone who recommended both. God! Terrible pickups. Both muddy, no clarity.
Also, I'm not a fan of the JB. Too trebly, can come off harsh.

Okay, here's my thoughts:
You named a wide variety of tones.
Punk: You'll need a good bridge pickup to get the right kinda crunch for punk rhythms.
Classic Rock: PAF style is always the way to go.
Metal: Need hot leads in the bridge, and warm, chunky rhythms from the neck that can dirty up with a good distortion.

Here's what I need to know:
What kind of guitar are you building? What kind of wood? How important is it to have hum canceling in the middle position? Presumably a 5 position selector, right?
#7
yes 5 way selector
explain hum cancelling in the middle 2 me
its a tele style made of alder with a maple meck
and i dont really need the lead for metal cos i dont play metal excessively i need the lead for the classic rock an punk
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Dan

Don't stop being you <3


Quote by fatgoogle
I think after this relentless adding for the last 10 mins, that Dan is the coolest looking. Goddamn welsh people and my great etc etc etc etc etc granddad is welsh.
#8
Okay, that makes it easier.

Well, a humbucker is called a humbucker because it has two coils that are set next to each other. One of them is RWRP, and baaaaasically, this causes them to cancel out the 60hz cycle hum. I mean, some of it is still present, but it;'s greatly reduced, when compared to a single coil pickup. It makes a good difference when you play with alot of gain.
That's a big reason why ALOT of metal and har rock bands just use humbuckers.
Shielding can also help combat hum, so it's not like a single coil is a bad thing....You could never get single coil tone from a humbucker. They just can't dial in the same kind of sparkle and clarity.

And as for hum cancelling specifically in the middle, You could potentially wire the set-up so that when you put it in the positions 2 and 4, you only use one of the humbucker coils in series with the middle pickup, and it cancels the hum.
#9
like a strat??
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Dan

Don't stop being you <3


Quote by fatgoogle
I think after this relentless adding for the last 10 mins, that Dan is the coolest looking. Goddamn welsh people and my great etc etc etc etc etc granddad is welsh.
#10
i plan on wiring it up exactly like a strat so will that give the hum cancelling effect
Quote by bassmanjoe08
Dan

Don't stop being you <3


Quote by fatgoogle
I think after this relentless adding for the last 10 mins, that Dan is the coolest looking. Goddamn welsh people and my great etc etc etc etc etc granddad is welsh.
#12
yes the fret board will be maple as well

i got a wiring diagram from the seymour duncan site but its too big to post on here
Quote by bassmanjoe08
Dan

Don't stop being you <3


Quote by fatgoogle
I think after this relentless adding for the last 10 mins, that Dan is the coolest looking. Goddamn welsh people and my great etc etc etc etc etc granddad is welsh.
#13
Oh, okay. They have one for HSH?
Hm, musta missed it.

I see it. Out of curiousity, you're speaking of the one with the push-pull pot, right? That's the one with the coil split. The other one is just a normal HSH config.

Okay, I know Seymour Duncan, so that's what I'll be recommending.
Your guitar is made of maple and alder, so it's going to already be bright. So that's something we have to keep in mind. Also, since you've got an HB in the neck, the single coil should be hotter than it, to balance out the output, but still not hotter than the bridge.

Neck:
SH-1 '59 - Their PAF style 'bucker. Excellent for classic rock. PAF is the definitive classic rock 'bucker style.
APH-1 Alnico II Pro - Also an excellent choice for classic rock. Since you're using a bright wood, this might be better because its designed for brighter guitars, but in the end, it's all preference. The 59 would still sound good in your guitar, but I'd go with the APH-1.

Middle:
There's a couple of thoughts here. Since its in the middle, I always like to think it should have a high output than the neck, but lower than the bridge. However, this output difference can be slightly corrected by simply having the neck pickup's height lowered a little bit, and then having the middle pickup raised a little bit.
Here's potential pickups.
SSL-1 vintage staggered or SSL-2 vintage flat - These are their classic, vintage-style single coils. Both excellent models, and are great for Strats. However, their output is slightly lower than the neck pickups I picked out. These are geared more towards classic rock. Between the two, one has raised pole pieces, the other one has flat ones. Preference. Go with the Flat if you use an unwound G.
APST-1 Twang Banger - Well, it's a Tele style body, why not get a little more twang in here? This would work well for punk. Lots of bite for the punk rhythm. Balanced well with the set in terms of output.
SSL-5 Custom Staggered - The hottest output of the single coils I recommended. Definitely geared more towards hard rock and classic rock. I'd recommend lowering the pickup height just a tad on this one, to help it not be too high an output. Still lower output than the bridge, though, in case you were wondering.


Bridge:
SH-11 Custom Custom - Yeah, that's what it's called. Haha. Custom Custom. It's their SH-5 Duncan Custom with an Alnico II bar instead of the ceramic magnet - This'll balance out your already bright guitar wood. Definitely aggressive bridge, should be able to do punk, hard rock, and maybe even metal with a good pedal.
Last edited by forsaknazrael at Jan 7, 2007,
#14
no i aint check the 1 with the push pull pot i wanna keep it as simple as possible

are there any advantages of having the push pull pot??

and would having the single coil slanted make any difference to the choice of pickup?
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Dan

Don't stop being you <3


Quote by fatgoogle
I think after this relentless adding for the last 10 mins, that Dan is the coolest looking. Goddamn welsh people and my great etc etc etc etc etc granddad is welsh.
Last edited by skater dan0 at Jan 7, 2007,
#15
Well, the push pull pot is what would allow it to coil split the neck and bridge pickups.
And have a hum canceling effect.

Check the clips on the site for the pickups I rec'd, see what ya think.

Also, email SD support, I'm not sure if you need to have the middle pickup RWRP, or not. The coil tap taps the adjustable coil on the HB, but I don't know if that's RWRP with a normal middle pickup.....
#16
i like the options uve suggested i'll probably go with the aph alnico ii pro, the apst 1 twang banger and the sh11 custom custom

but this hum cancelling thing has never been a problem on my strat wen i just use the middle pick up so y would it be a problem with this idea
Quote by bassmanjoe08
Dan

Don't stop being you <3


Quote by fatgoogle
I think after this relentless adding for the last 10 mins, that Dan is the coolest looking. Goddamn welsh people and my great etc etc etc etc etc granddad is welsh.
#17
Well, Strats always have hum cancelling positions in 2 and 4, these days. It's pretty much standard wiring. However, using the non push-pull config would not yield hum cancelling.

You might notice it, you might not. You can always change it later.

Oh, for pots, I recommend using 500K pots, and wiring a 150K resistor in there like so:
http://www.stewmac.com/wiring101/resistors_capacitors.html
The treble bleed cap is also nice, but that's just personal preference. Helps out with having a more linear volume control. Do the same thing on your tone pot. The resistor will make it see a 350K pot in there, which is better for the single coil pickup, so it won't be too bright. This will also warm up your HB's a little, but no harm done there. I just find that too much treble can be a bad thing.

Also, a .033 capacitor for tone, if you can find one. It's a good compomise between a HB tone cap (.022) and a single coil tone cap (.047).

Also, an unslanted pickup just means a little less treble on the lighter strings. That's all slanting does...add more treble.
Last edited by forsaknazrael at Jan 7, 2007,
#18
Someone may have allready mentioned this but here is my two cents:

Regardless of what pickups you use, use your neck pickup for leads and your bridge pickup for rhythm. This will give you clarity with a managable 'chunkiness' when playing rhythm and a creamy, not to screamy lead tone.