#1
When recording guitar, drums, vocals, bass, piano, and so on, whats everyone's opinions to adding reverb during recording or adding reverb in the mix. I read that addin it during recording could cause the entire mix to be "over-verbed" if you find you need some at mixdown anyways. Im wondering how everyone here does it, if they shut off the reverb to record or not?
Quote by MeGaDeth2314
just stick something in the hole and wiggle it around until you feel something poking out then push it hard.



Quote by gallagher2006
I seriously cant begin to tell you how refreshing it is to get some briliiant help from this site for once!

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#2
Technically you should record dry (no reverb added etc) - all the pros work that way. But in general I will go against that, unless you are in a professional level situation. About 90% of the people here don't meet that criteria.

The reason is I think you should focus on your live sound and get decent equipment to do it with instead of playing around with the mix in a recorder. If you suck live, you are not going anywhere, no matter what your demo sounds like, unless you are Brittany Spears.
#3
Quote by ozarkracer
Technically you should record dry (no reverb added etc) - all the pros work that way. But in general I will go against that, unless you are in a professional level situation. About 90% of the people here don't meet that criteria.

The reason is I think you should focus on your live sound and get decent equipment to do it with instead of playing around with the mix in a recorder. If you suck live, you are not going anywhere, no matter what your demo sounds like, unless you are Brittany Spears.



Well see Im actually doing this more for a music art project then for a band so Im studying up on sound engineering and won't the best sound possible on my song(s)

Also out of curiosity, what is a spring reverb and how does it work exactly?
Quote by MeGaDeth2314
just stick something in the hole and wiggle it around until you feel something poking out then push it hard.



Quote by gallagher2006
I seriously cant begin to tell you how refreshing it is to get some briliiant help from this site for once!

Thats about me
#4
it depends on what im doing as to how ill do the reverb. usually if im recording my guitar amp i have the amps reverb on, but not too much. if im using a distance mic to get some room ambiance i usually turn the reverb down more or even off because you get natural reverb. for most other stuff i record it dry and then add effects later. instruments where you can get some distance mics on it can get a natural reverb that you dont want to mess with. think of the drums on Led Zeppelin's 'When the Levee Breaks' for a great example of natural reverb on drums.

then with most other stuff, i like to add the reverb while mixing. i find that if i cant get a good natural reverb its better not to put it on while recording. i find that digital reverbs have to be manipulated a lot more in the mix so i like to be able to tweak it constantly. thats how i do it, but its best to experiment and see what works best for you.
#5
If the reverb (and other effects ) are for creative purposes, I'll put them on while tracking. For example, if a delay is used like The Edge in a song, that it has to go down while we are tracking.

However, if the delay is there to add ambiance in a mix, it needs to wait until I'm really mixing.

I feel that way about all effects.

Drums are an exception...sort of. Drums I only recording in big rooms at pro studios. These big rooms have a big reverb sound which I may use. This is NOT the same thing as using a plugin or any other digital reverb.

Brandon