#1
I recently used a mobile phone headset to record my music on to the computer with audacity and after a little while it started going really fuzzy. So today I'm getting a real computer mic, one of those ones that goes on top of the monitor. Anyway, how loud do you think I can go without ****ing it up? [Oh yeah BTW my amp is a Line-6 Spider II 75 Watts] Don't start flaming me about my amp, all I want is a li'l help...
Last edited by doomnight at Jan 7, 2007,
#2
either turn yourself down or put the recording device outside the room, or maybe put something in front of it? Its really a matter of making it so that the band is softer than what it really is
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#3
Kay, but if I turn myself down... you can hear me strumming and can barely hear the amp, so good idea for putting it out of the room as I need to hear what I previously recorded through my earphones whilst I'm playing.
Last edited by doomnight at Jan 7, 2007,
#4
Well, you get the buzz from the moniter. so move away from the moniter to get away from the buzz. if your that worried about it, Press start, move away from your computer, record. go back and cut and past the time. The moniter gives of waves that go through your pickups as sound.
One Percent
#5
you're peaking. turn down the mic.
"There he goes. One of God's own prototypes. Some kind of high powered mutant never even considered for mass production. Too weird to live, and too rare to die."-Duke
#6
basicly, you should get some kind of filter i think.

and you can't turn up very loud at all, but loud enough so you can't hear you strumming.
#7
Quote by sicformyage
Well, you get the buzz from the moniter. so move away from the moniter to get away from the buzz. if your that worried about it, Press start, move away from your computer, record. go back and cut and past the time. The moniter gives of waves that go through your pickups as sound.


I understand what you're saying, but cut and paste the time?
And how far away from the monitor, will the cord on the mic be long enough? My amp is about 2 and a half metres away from my computer.
#8
Ok, why do you insist on playing your modeling amp over some crappy little computer mic? Why don't you run from the line-out of your spider amp into the line in of your soundcard?

A digital modeling amp should have a "cabinet" setting that you can activate on or off which reproduces the dynamics of a mic'd cabinet. Much better sound, quiet, controllable and you can hear your previous tracks whilst recording and you can do it without headphones - because you're not using a mic.
#9
cabinet setting??? and i dont have a cord that fits into my amp and also on the other end to my computer...
#10
Quote by doomnight
cabinet setting??? and i dont have a cord that fits into my amp and also on the other end to my computer...


Yes, cabinet setting. Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't the spider amp a modeler? If so, it will have amp models and cabinet models. When using the speakers from your amp, you normally won't use the cabinet models - so they're typically turned off automagically.

However, if you're running from your line-out of your spider amp, you'll want to use the cabinet models because they condition the amplified signal to sound like an amp and cabinet that is being mic'd. You want this because an amplified signal from your amp sounds like shit until it hits your cabinet and speakers, as with pretty much all amps.

Anyway, get out your manual if you don't know how to turn on cabinet modeling and use it. You'll love the sound and it will solve all of the problems you've mentioned on this thread, not to mention a whole host of other problems you don't know about yet.

As for the cord...buy one. That's like saying "I don't have a pick", or "I don't have an E string".

Edit: Ok, after looking up the Spider II, I don't think it has a cabinet mode. So, just ignore that part, but use the record out / line out. Compare that with the sound you've been getting using your computer mic. It should blow away any mic'ing attempts by your computer mic.
Last edited by ParanoiaMusic at Jan 8, 2007,
#11
^He's right. It'd make it so much easier to get rid of what you called 'fuzzy'. Which I guess is like a crackling, in which case that would be clipping.

You'd be able to set the level of the signal you're recording to the highest and loudest setting possible without clipping just by listening and a little trial and error, rather than use a budget computer mic. I'd say that's the way to go.
#12
Ok, why do you insist on playing your modeling amp over some crappy little computer mic? Why don't you run from the line-out of your spider amp into the line in of your soundcard?


If you want anything that sounds remotely listenable, I suggest you pick up a soundcard and an SM57 and do it right.

You are wasting your time going direct or using a terrible computer mic.

Brandon
#13
Quote by brandondrury
If you want anything that sounds remotely listenable, I suggest you pick up a soundcard and an SM57 and do it right.

You are wasting your time going direct or using a terrible computer mic.

Brandon


I disagree. Going DI with a modeler can capture a sound better than a mic in a non-professional, noisey setting.

I understand your intent, but seriously, have you compared a good DI box with amateur mic'ing?

I've always mic'd my stuff. But here lately I tried a DI box with cabinet emulation and my sound is awesome, thick, warm and not nearly so noisey and scratchy as my SM57.

In a real studio, a mic would beat the shit out of my DI box, but in a noisey home studio, I think the DI box is superior.