#1
Howdy. Well, I'm a beginer to guitar playing and I want to buy a cheap slide to play some Tool stuff and other stuff (since I can always trip in some music that use a slide). I'm thinking of buying a cheap metal slide, but I'm curious, is there a diference between the metal, glass and porcelain slides? And what about the thickness?


Anyway, the other day I went to the only open music shop arround and it had a brass Dunlop slide.

The package had this writen: "acousticly tested", so I prefered to keep my money and come to the all mighty source of all information: the interwebs.

So, I want to know if that slide is suitable for electric guitar, it's versatile enough for me to use it to play a big range of songs and what would be most suitable wall thickness for it.


Thanks in advance.
#2
Pretty much all slides are cheap. Never more than $8-9 at any shop I have seen. I prefer and use a dunlop glass slide, mines a 215.
Fender 60th Anniv MIM Strat (SD Little 59er Br)
Agile AL-2000 Rootbeer Flame (GFS Vtg '59)
Fender Hot Rod Deluxe
GFS Chorus
DS-1
#3
I've seen porcelain and ceramic ones going up to 25$.

But anyway, if you could answer to the rest of my doubt I would be thankfull |:
Last edited by k*CMYK at Jan 7, 2007,
#4
Dude, acoustically tested just means each slide is tested individually for its sound properties. You can use a slide on an electric, but your action cannot be really low or you'll hear the change in frets. I use a brass dunlop for acoustic and electric. As far as I know, each slide and each material has a certain brightness or darkness of sound (you know, like from tinny to more mellow sounding). The brightest is aluminum/chrome, then brass, and I think glass has the darkest sound. I'm not sure about porcelain's but I hear they are good for blues, so not really Tool type stuff.
#6
I've got a Gibson slide. Works great. 202. It's a metal alloy not really sure what it is. I also have a glass side which I think sounds better. If your into the 'pingy' sound then metal is good but if you want the dark sound I'd go with glass.
#7
Quote by afroboy
Dude, acoustically tested just means each slide is tested individually for its sound properties. You can use a slide on an electric, but your action cannot be really low or you'll hear the change in frets. I use a brass dunlop for acoustic and electric. As far as I know, each slide and each material has a certain brightness or darkness of sound (you know, like from tinny to more mellow sounding). The brightest is aluminum/chrome, then brass, and I think glass has the darkest sound. I'm not sure about porcelain's but I hear they are good for blues, so not really Tool type stuff.


I see, thanks. Sorry for the dumbness, but I'm REALY short on money and I'm strying to save it up to buy some more stuff, like straplocks, capo, a decent strap, etc. and I don't want to burn my reduced amout of cash. |:


But would you advise me to get the brass one or the chrome/alumni ones? And what about the thickness of it (god this part sounded wrong)? |:
#8
what are those numbers the 202s andstuff
Quote by Izdigger
Arrrgh! The agony! Bring me a virgin and a cup of Devil's brew!


Quote by mr kipling
I can sweep with my boner.I have to use light strings, otherwise My penis will look like an emo wrist.
#9
Quote by k*CMYK
I've seen porcelain and ceramic ones going up to 25$.

But anyway, if you could answer to the rest of my doubt I would be thankfull |:


Well no shit, sherlock. The point I was making is that the majority of slides are less than $10. There will always be a few that cost lots more, but lets pretend those don't exist.

The wall thickness does matter, too thin you won't get good sustain but too thick and you can't feel as well and the extra weight pushes the strings down too much (bad).

Glass has a mellower tone, any metal slide sounds a lot sharper. Metal slides would be good for an acoustic, glass for electric. And the wound strings is where the difference really is.
Fender 60th Anniv MIM Strat (SD Little 59er Br)
Agile AL-2000 Rootbeer Flame (GFS Vtg '59)
Fender Hot Rod Deluxe
GFS Chorus
DS-1
#11
The numbers, like the 215 I listed is the model number. There are so many thicknesses and diameters they use a single number for each slide (this is Dunlop). Mine is a 215, the package will have this on it and so does the slide (in the form of a small sticker.) Just so you know, I paid $6.75 for this slide.
Fender 60th Anniv MIM Strat (SD Little 59er Br)
Agile AL-2000 Rootbeer Flame (GFS Vtg '59)
Fender Hot Rod Deluxe
GFS Chorus
DS-1
#12
I don't mean to hijack the thread or anything, but I'm 12 and have small hands, would it be possible to get a slide that I could use?
Mitch Hedberg Group
http://groups.ultimate-guitar.com/koalabears/

Quote by Irnmaiden4life
why didnt you just play like crap?
if you need help with that, ask Vincent745



Quote by imgooley
Awe, so cute...

How old are you?



Quote by H4T3BR33D3R


Old enough to yell rape.
#13
Yeah, they make small ones, and it doesn't really have to fit that tightly. I am an adult and I actually find most slides too small for my finger, so you shouldn't have a problem.
Fender 60th Anniv MIM Strat (SD Little 59er Br)
Agile AL-2000 Rootbeer Flame (GFS Vtg '59)
Fender Hot Rod Deluxe
GFS Chorus
DS-1
#14
thanks, i've been worrying about that, cause there's a good number of songs i want to play that use a slide
Mitch Hedberg Group
http://groups.ultimate-guitar.com/koalabears/

Quote by Irnmaiden4life
why didnt you just play like crap?
if you need help with that, ask Vincent745



Quote by imgooley
Awe, so cute...

How old are you?



Quote by H4T3BR33D3R


Old enough to yell rape.
#15
I find playing slide a blast. I am also a big fan of blues so they go hand in hand. Remeber to mute the strings you are not playing or you will get a lot (a lot) of undesirable noise. And many players fingerpick while playing slide, that helps in muting because you can use your extra fingers to do so.
Fender 60th Anniv MIM Strat (SD Little 59er Br)
Agile AL-2000 Rootbeer Flame (GFS Vtg '59)
Fender Hot Rod Deluxe
GFS Chorus
DS-1