#1
How can I get better at improvising on the guitar? Like, at church, the guitar player broke down into this mad solo that sounded sweet and after church I asked him how long it took him to learn it, and turns out he was just improvising. So, how do I start and learn the basics, then advance in it? It all sounded so good together.
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I LOVE DRAGONBALL Z
#2
im with you (though i have a ways to go before i end up soloing with any great talent, im still interested)
Quote by lateraluspiral
play twinkle twinkle little star. thatll blow some socks off.

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I wish I was this badass !
#3
1. Learn your penatonic scales. Be able to play them all over the neck. Absolutely essential.
2. Learn licks. Random note solos are not good, even if they are in key. Licks, runs and patterns are the key to good playing.
3. Learn any further scales and modes, and be able to take these into consideration when playing over different types of chords (maj, min, 7th, dim, sus, 9th, 11th, 13th)

Have fun while you do it too. Just let go and play as you feel.
#4
Quote by SnowHeyOh
1. Learn your penatonic scales. Be able to play them all over the neck. Absolutely essential.
2. Learn licks. Random note solos are not good, even if they are in key. Licks, runs and patterns are the key to good playing.
3. Learn any further scales and modes, and be able to take these into consideration when playing over different types of chords (maj, min, 7th, dim, sus, 9th, 11th, 13th)

Have fun while you do it too. Just let go and play as you feel.


1. How do I learn those essentials?
2. What are licks and runs, and how do I learn them?
3. How do I learn further scales and modes?

I'm a music retard when it comes to advanced stuff.
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I LOVE DRAGONBALL Z
#5
1. http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/scales/minor_pentatonic_scales.html Memorise these scales and play them to a metronome all over the fretboard.

2. A lick is a short musical phrase used in lead playing. A run is a fast ascending or descending musical movement. Listen to your favourite solo's and pick out a few phrases that you like and try to improvise something similar (using the minor pentatonic scale for starters). Try to say a sentence with your guitar. Or if you like just get tabs and steal some licks. Commit these licks to memory and pull them out every now and then.

3. see link in my sig. LEARN it.

Oh and this isn't advanced, they are the basic essential tools for a guitarist.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#6
So...how do I use scales to improvise?
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I LOVE DRAGONBALL Z
#7
Say you have a chord progression in E minor. For example, Em - G - Bm - D, you could play the notes in the E minor pentatonic scale (E G A B D) and it would 'fit'. You could think of a scale as a guidline that shows what notes will work in that key (E minor).

Obviously you don't just play the scale up and down in order. You play the notes in the scale in various combinations and durations in order to make a phrase, usually ending on the root note (E).

Is this helping??
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#8
Quote by Ænimus Prime
usually ending on the root note (E).
No! You will generally end on a chord tone, most often the root, but landing on the tonic of the entire progression is far from a rule.

Here's a great video. Prepare to learn and be humbled at the same time!
#9
Troy Stetina's Heavy Metal Lead Guitar. Find it, read it, memorize it, make love to it. Seriously. Combine that with his Speed Mechanics for Lead Guitar and you're an instant winner.
Jackson DKMG & KE3, Fender Mexican Strat, Stagg Acoustic

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Looking to jam in Belfast, PM me!
#10
Learn licks from other songs to add into your improv.

Check out any Hendrix, Slash, Skynyrd, Beck song and get tabs and when you hear a sweet lick in the song find that part in the tab and learn it, then move it around the neck, and play it in different keys.
#11
I've been improvising a good while now (over 30 years) and if there's ONE thing
I'd recommend to anyone who wants to learn, it is: Start with Blues!

It's a fairly simple and consistent form of music that doesn't require a lot of theory
and/or scales to start sounding good with. Basically all you need to know is the
minor pentatonic scale (or Blues scale) and you're good to go.

A scale is a structure you build solos around. You'd just start playing whatever notes
you want from the scale and experiment with them over the chord progression.
It also helps quite a bit at first, to know what a number of the standard "cliche"
licks are. Blues has a number of them that just about everyone uses. Your best
bet is get yourself some Blues books. A good one will cover all this stuff.
#12
i think the best tool to have for improvisation is knowledge of the modes because they will open up the fretboard and offer more possibilities.
#13
^ thats a good start, also the more you improv the better you will become at it. i sucked at improv initially, now its the only way i know how to write solos and most of my songs are improv'ed too.
#14
Learn your pentatonic and blues minor scale to begin with, and start jammin along to cds in the the minor keys(easier and more fun than major scales to start). Learn techniques, hammer ons, pull offs, bends, vibrato, picking, and sliding between notes.

Learn to transfer between the two scales seamlessly.

Listen closely to classic stuff to pick up on more basic use of the techniques, tunes like Jonny B. Goode are an excellent example of using the basics.

Once you have the basics, try not to think when you play, but to feel what you want, a natural progression in sound if you will. Change in tempo etc, change intensity of picking etc etc.

Use the internet to your advantage!! All this info on technique etc is out there.

Thats all I can suggest from personal experience, not the holy grail of advice I would imagine but it worked for me.
Last edited by Acoustic=junkie at Jan 8, 2007,