#1
Ohk, so the other day i was reading this article.
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/music_theory/its_not_just_about_power_chords.html

And it was talking about Perfect fourth double stops.
Now i know for powerchords it is the root note and its perfect fifth.
So if the root note is a D, then you count on 5 full steps and you get an A, which is your perfect fifth.
But then when it comes to these perfect fourths, its saying that, if the root note is a C, then the perfect fourth is an F.
And that is four semi tones difference, which is i guess where they get the perfect fourth from.

But why does it differ from the perfect fifth when it comes to powerchords. Why is it (unless I am missing something) that in perfect fifths the difference is five full tones from the root, while in the perfect fourth it is 4 semi tones difference?
#2
Umm, I think the perfect fifth is seven semitones from the root.

Edit:

So perfect fourth = 5 semitones
flattened/diminished fifth = 6 semitones
fifth = 7 semitones

2nd Edit: Im gonna run through this real quick:

Quote by johnos


Now i know for powerchords it is the root note and its perfect fifth.
Yes, that is correct.
So if the root note is a D, then you count on 5 full steps and you get an A, which is your perfect fifth.
A is seven HALF steps from D
But then when it comes to these perfect fourths, its saying that, if the root note is a C, then the perfect fourth is an F.
And that is four semi tones difference, which is i guess where they get the perfect fourth from.
yes...

But why does it differ from the perfect fifth when it comes to powerchords. Why is it (unless I am missing something) that in perfect fifths the difference is five full tones from the root, while in the perfect fourth it is 4 semi tones difference?
Yeah, a perfect fifth is seven half steps, perfect fourth is five.
Last edited by bassdrum at Jan 8, 2007,
#4
Quote by johnos
Ohk, so the other day i was reading this article.
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/music_theory/its_not_just_about_power_chords.html

And it was talking about Perfect fourth double stops.
Now i know for powerchords it is the root note and its perfect fifth.
So if the root note is a D, then you count on 5 full steps and you get an A, which is your perfect fifth.
But then when it comes to these perfect fourths, its saying that, if the root note is a C, then the perfect fourth is an F.
And that is four semi tones difference, which is i guess where they get the perfect fourth from.

But why does it differ from the perfect fifth when it comes to powerchords. Why is it (unless I am missing something) that in perfect fifths the difference is five full tones from the root, while in the perfect fourth it is 4 semi tones difference?
Try this Introduction to Intervals and when you feel you're on solid ground move on to Group 1 Intervals, which includes the Perfect Fourth.

If this doesn't answer your questions, keep asking.
gpb
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- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
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#5
Ahk yeah i get it now. Thanks.

I'm pretty new to theory, and without a teacher (besides the internet) it can get pretty confusing at times. But its a bit of fun trying to figure it out. And it has helped my playing quite a bit. Which is good