#1
So I'm wondering if this is bad technique

...ok I have to try and explain this...

so I'm playing a strat and, on my picking hand I always have my pinky and ring finger, I guess... anchoring my picking hand...

it this a bad habit?
if so how am I supposed to pick???
Gear:
Ibanez JS100
03 Squier Strat
1980 Ovation Matrix Accoustic
Peavey Valveking 112
Washburn T-14 Taurus (Bass)
SWR Working Pro 100 watt bass amp
#2
i always have my pinky on the guitar, i've seen many other professional players do the same too, you should be fine.
#3
its not proper form, and can slow you down. But a lot of people do it with no problems. The "proper" way is to make your hand into a loose fist with the the thumb and index finger sticking out a bit to hold the pick, this can be adjusted for palm muting and whatnot but its IMO the best way to do it.
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Last edited by Kid_Thorazine at Jan 8, 2007,
#4
It's all good as long as you feel comfortable. Try playing in different other positions and see if anything will feel better to you - without trying to be super fast or accurate at this point. Just find the position that FEELS best for you, and THEN work on developing fast speed and precision in that position.
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#5
Quote by ar73m
It's all good as long as you feel comfortable. Try playing in different other positions and see if anything will feel better to you - without trying to be super fast or accurate at this point. Just find the position that FEELS best for you, and THEN work on developing fast speed and precision in that position.


Ultimately, that doesn't really work out too well. What might seem to feel more
comfortable at first, often isn't the best way to play.

Run a search for "anchoring". You'll find out everything you need to know about it.
#6
Quote by edg
Ultimately, that doesn't really work out too well. What might seem to feel more
comfortable at first, often isn't the best way to play.

Run a search for "anchoring". You'll find out everything you need to know about it.

Yeah you're right... Just look at Michael Angelo Batio, that guy anchors and his picking speed sucks so bad... or John Petrucci, Steve Vai, Troy Stetina... Look at Friedman's hand position, it's not what *I* would call comfortable, either. Malmsteen says anchoring your hand is an absolute must, at least when doing sweeps and tremolo picking - and I wouldn't call him terrible at guitar, regardless of how many people hate him.

I see where the thing about anchoring being bad is coming from, I just don't think that the cons of it outweight the pro's, and the fact that there are so many great and fast guitarists who anchor out there, proves my point quite well.

That said, I don't anchor myself and I find it perfectly comfortable, while anchoring feels slightly awkward.
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#7
Yeah, those are the same old anchoring arguments. Whatever. It's not worth
rehashing it here.

The only reason I bothered was the comment "it's all good as long as you feel
comfortable". Which, applied to anchoring or anything else in general, I don't
think is very good advice if you're interested in making good progress on the
guitar. What may be the comfortable thing today, might be the very thing that
will hold you back tomorrow. That's how bad habits develop. You might be "lucky"
and guess right while you're learning, but more often than not, comfort in the
learning stages will tend to lead more to a bad habit than a good one.

And I don't mean "comfort" as in physical comfort/discomfort or pain. I mean it
in the sense that it's something that might seem difficult or impossible to do a
first, but with some practice becomes as easy as pie.
#8
Quote by ar73m
Yeah you're right... Just look at Michael Angelo Batio, that guy anchors and his picking speed sucks so bad... or John Petrucci, Steve Vai, Troy Stetina...


yeah look at him and see how he's got that much tension in his arm that it's nearly causing him physical pain.

John Petrucci is another one. Whilst his speed is good the tension he has WILL cause him an injury. I haven't seen it but I've been told that on DT cover of master of puppets JP strugles with the alt picking section of the second solo cos of the tension in his arm.

If you want to anchor then do so but it can limit your speed and causes tension in your arm which can lead to injuries whn playing at high speeds.
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Quote by element4433
Yeah. people, like Lemoninfluence, are hypocrites and should have all their opinions invalidated from here on out.
#9
Also... "Malmsteen says anchoring your hand is an absolute must" Source please?
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#10
nope its more akin to playing the lute in a way though
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#11
yeah anchor vs unanchored, search for the thread, its about 6,000 pg's long. ultimately after having done both (when i started playing i was anchoring my hand) my personal opinion is that anchoring will slow you down and is a bad habit. but you (much like many others) will do what you want.
#12
Quote by Resiliance
Also... "Malmsteen says anchoring your hand is an absolute must" Source please?

It's in Russian so it would probably be a little hard to read, I assume the original was in english but I've got no idea where to find it. It was a masterclass on sweep picking that he was giving though, it goes something like "If you want to achieve precision and control of your sweeps, you'll need to keep contact with your guitar, I would suggest placing one or two of your fingers on the pickguard", or something similar to that.

As for other stuff, I dunno if MAB feels 'physical pain' when playing or not, I'm not really into him, but as for JP struggling to play MoP solos, was that a joke or something? He plays stuff that's twice as fast and more difficult live, and doesn't seem to 'struggle' with it, in fact when I was watching him play MoP he looked as if he was almost bored with it, it was absolutely natural and effortless. Meh.

Aslo, Troy Stetina is, imho, one of the best - if not the best - rock guitar instructor out there, and look what does he have to say about anchoring? So, meh again.

Anyway, it's pretty obvious I'm in the minority here and you guys stand by your opinions - but I stand by mine, so let's just agree to disagree.
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#13
well thanks, just wanted to know,
I think I am gonna try unanchored picking for about 2 months and see if it feels better on the arm, thanks
Gear:
Ibanez JS100
03 Squier Strat
1980 Ovation Matrix Accoustic
Peavey Valveking 112
Washburn T-14 Taurus (Bass)
SWR Working Pro 100 watt bass amp
#14
^ it will, once you get the technique down and get used to it you will start to see how much anchoring was holding you back, it actually took me about 4 months to get really used to it (of course i had been anchoring for going on 11 years when i decided to try unanchoring) the longer you play anchored the stranger its going to feel when you stop. but i will back up unanchored playing any day of the week. good luck on it man and don't give up with playing unanchored (believe me, you may want to initially, but if you don't it will reward you greatly)
t
#15
Quote by ar73m

Aslo, Troy Stetina is, imho, one of the best - if not the best - rock guitar instructor out there, and look what does he have to say about anchoring? So, meh again.


I don't know. What does he have to say? There's really no mention of it either
way in "Speed Mechanics".

IMO, Speed Mechanics is a good book. It goes further than most in actually trying
to describe good technique and the chapter on practicing is also good. However,
with respect to the fine, nitty-gritty details of good technique he mostly just punts.
He really has nearly 0 in Speed Mechanics that I'd say describes any kind of good
or bad picking technique. So, in the long run, his books end up being just a
collection of exercises to do -- like most other guitar books. But, he does go a bit
further than most.