#1
Ok, this is a quick one...

So basically if you go to the 6th degree of a major scale you get its relative minor, right?
So suppose I have a major barre at the 3rd fret, E string (doesn't matter what chord it is, you'll get my point). And we know that the 5th fret on the A string is its 5th (because of power chords). Then we move that chord to the 7th fret to get to the major 6th interval - and voila! We get that initial chord's (3rd fret, E string) relative minor.

Now basically the question is: am I right? :-/
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#2
the relative minor of a chord is three frets down from it.... so the E at the 7th fret of the A string would have a relative minor of C# and so on for the other chords, and vice versa, the relative major is three frets up from the starting chord. Hope that answers your question... probably doesnt though...
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#3
very well done, in the case u stated above the relative minor of G major would be E minor
#4
Quote by Gakusey
Ok, this is a quick one...

So basically if you go to the 6th degree of a major scale you get its relative minor, right?
So suppose I have a major barre at the 3rd fret, E string (doesn't matter what chord it is, you'll get my point). And we know that the 5th fret on the A string is its 5th (because of power chords). Then we move that chord to the 7th fret to get to the major 6th interval - and voila! We get that initial chord's (3rd fret, E string) relative minor.

Now basically the question is: am I right? :-/


Yes, you are right.

The first reply you got was stating that say you barre 3rd fret on the E string, you could also find the relative minor by counting three frets down (3 - 3 = 0). This means that if you play G Major, E is your relative minor.

Both ways are correct.