#1
[first off i play in a progmetal band].......yes..uh i have a quation about over dubbing and panning guitar tracks. ive read in numerous articles that bands will record certain riffs 2-4 times a peice and then pan them ard left and right and leave more technical riffs in the middle (not panned at all) how does over dubnbing the guitars help the sound (i have to convince my drummer that we should try it). And i tryd panning the guitar parts hard left and right and they end up sounding too "distant" like they are 20ft behind you........whehw yeah .....any other suggestions on how to make my guitar tracks sound more proffesional will help thank you

-zach THM


fyi i am close micing one speaker on a fender hotrod deville with a mxr distortion pedal through a Pa head then into my computer.....i am also using Cube se software
#2
Did you increase the volume after panning? When you pan hard left or right, you're going to lose half of your volume - that's normal, just turn it up. Are you using reverb? Are you getting natural reverb through the micing process?

Because I'm not sure how you got a "distant" sound. Should be quite dry, right up front.

Anyway, you're definitely on the right track. Incidentally the technical parts sound cool doubled up as well, it's just hard to pull it off.

And what are you doing listening to the drummer? No one listens to them, they're beat keepers - not melody producers like us. Tell him to shut up and bang on his meat or something...

(...I'm only saying all this because I'm a drummer also...)
#3
no im not getting natural reverb but it might be that the software can pan so far that it goes not just "east and west" but south? (sorry for the bad analogy there) no i havent tried to turn it up.
#4
Quote by mesametal
no im not getting natural reverb but it might be that the software can pan so far that it goes not just "east and west" but south? (sorry for the bad analogy there) no i havent tried to turn it up.


Not too familiar with Cubase, but it should have a meter with each track so you can compensate for the volume drop.

Anyway, just raise the volume level on those tracks that are panned until it sounds about right. Incidentally, you might try decreasing the pan too. If I'm doing two guitars, I usually go 75/75, but if I'm doing 4 guitar tracks I'll do two at 100/100 and two at 60/60 - so you have a nice distribution of sound without too much separation.

Also, sometimes I'll keep the volume up on two guitar tracks, then lower it on the other two guitar tracks. It takes some of the overprocessed sound out of it, adds more presence - yet is thick and full sounding.