#1
Hey I'm learning the melodic minor modes, and I'm a little confused. I know that theres, the ascending pattern, and the descending pattern, but I'm not exactly sure what that means. From what I understand, when you're playing lead, whenever you're moving to higher notes, you have to use the ascending pattern, and when you're going back down, you have to use the natural minor pattern. Does that mean that I have to switch back and forth constantly when playing lead? It seems like a pain to do.
#2
That is what you do. The tones in melodic only serve their function acsending and lose their tonal purpose and sound too major or ambiguous while decending.
Quote by zackk
seriously though, listen to DaliLama.
Quote by Arthur Curry
My spidey sense tells me some mothafuckas are gonna be BANNED.
#3
You don't have to use the descending pattern. In fact, it's rarely used at all anymore.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#4
Quote by Archeo Avis
You don't have to use the descending pattern. In fact, it's rarely used at all anymore.

Well, the descending pattern is the natural minor scale which is used a hell of a lot.

And yes, when you go up you use the ascending pattern, and when you go down you use the descending pattern, or else going down will sound extremely major and likely clash badly with whatever you're playing over.
#5
Quote by Me2NiK
Well, the descending pattern is the natural minor scale which is used a hell of a lot.


You know exactly what I'm talking about. He's not asking how to play the natural minor scale, he's asking how to play the melodic minor scale, and the descending pattern is very rarely used anymore.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#6
Yeah I already know all the modes of the major scale and pentatonic and stuff like that. I'm trying to improve my lead playing by having a bigger "scalar vocabulary." But anyway, are you guys saying I can just play the one pattern both ways and have it still sound good? Is it kind of like with the minor pentatonic scale, how you can also add extra notes in from the minor scale to add flavor, but you dont have to?
#7
Quote by FlyF1402
Yeah I already know all the modes of the major scale and pentatonic and stuff like that. I'm trying to improve my lead playing by having a bigger "scalar vocabulary." But anyway, are you guys saying I can just play the one pattern both ways and have it still sound good? Is it kind of like with the minor pentatonic scale, how you can also add extra notes in from the minor scale to add flavor, but you dont have to?


Unless you're playing classical music, you really don't have to worry the descending pattern. You can use the ascending exclusively if you want.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#9
i believe the ascending half of the scale used on its own is called the jazz minor. As for the whole ascending and descending, the difference in the descending was originally used to make it easier for singers to come back down the scale... so ive been told
What the ancients called a clever fighter is one who not only wins, but excels in winning with ease.

Sun Tsu, The Art OF War