#1
So, my beloved has recently developed buzz in the higher frets, and I need someone to help me PLEASE. The buzz, I think, is due to the action dropping significantly. That may be due to the cold, dry, and fluctuating weather I'm in, but I'm not positive. The buzz formed over christmas break when I left my guitar in its case for 2 weeks with the strings completely detuned, and maybe that has something to do with it. Please tell me how I can fix this and thank you a million times in advance.

Btw, the guitar is an Alvarez PD85SCAV with cedar top and fret board, and rose wood back and sides, the strings are moderately old, medium gauge and phosphour bronze... if it matters. Thanks again.
Last edited by flashbandit at Jan 9, 2007,
#2
When was the last time your strings were changed? For example, I change mine every three to four months to make sure it's functioning well.
Good luck.
#3
I change mine just as frequently. Is it that the strings aren't pulling the neck as much as there supposed to? or is it that I left the strings loose for too long and the neck forze in that position? How do I fix it?
#5
So I've heard horror stories about truss rod adjustments and I don't want to f mine up, but I still want to do it myself. I thought I heard something about how raising the action is relatively safe but dropping it is dangerous... is that true? And is there a tut I could follow anywhere?
#6
Just remember that the truss rod isnt for adjusting the action. You may have too little relief however (neck's too straight). If you want to raise the action, you have to raise the saddle with a shim.

Originally posted by rich_sg:

Why does your dad have an iPod? Old people aren't cool enough to own them


#7
Quote by Semi-Ario5491
Just remember that the truss rod isnt for adjusting the action. You may have too little relief however (neck's too straight). If you want to raise the action, you have to raise the saddle with a shim.
^^^^^
Hmmmm . . . . interesting, where did you hear that from?

Although the Truss Rod is used to maintain the guitar's elliptical shaped neck, and prevent it from warping, it is also used to make minor adjustments to the guitars action.

QUOTE FROM WIKIPEDIA:
Wikipedia:

The truss rod can be adjusted to compensate for expansion or contraction in the neck wood due to changes in humidity or temperature, or to compensate for changes in the tension of the strings (the thicker the guitar string, the higher its tension when tuned to concert pitch).

Also, different players often prefer different string heights (called the guitar's "action") depending on the style of music they play. For instance, a rock guitarist will often prefer a lower action than a jazz guitarist. Acoustic guitars also usually have higher actions than electric guitars.
.
Cole Clark FL1AC Acoustic

Quote by 2007 Stupidity Awards


Instead of using Valves, could I use Light Bulbs instead? If so, would the new energy saving ones be OK? Coz I do a lot of playing

I got my pick stuck inside my guitar . . . . how am I supposed to get it out?
Last edited by DJaye at Jan 10, 2007,
#10
Are the knobs which tune the strings loose? You might need them to screw them in? Just a thought.
#11
Sorry I should of said it isn't primarily used for raising the action...my bad.

Originally posted by rich_sg:

Why does your dad have an iPod? Old people aren't cool enough to own them