#1
hi,

i've just been learning these scales for an exam - i realized that they were both the same...is this right? can someone explain why it is that they're called two different things? maybe i've just misread my fretboard or something
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#2
they are relative to each other. both have the same key signature and therefore and the same notes. they are essentially the same scale in a diffrent mode. every scale will have one that is exactly the same. but in minor (or major)
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#3
A minor is the relative minor of C major, so yes, they are the same scale. They have different root notes (A and C, respectfully), and different chords would be played under them which makes them sound different. To get the relative minor of a major scale, you move the root note down 3 frets and play the natural minor scale, starting on the new root note.

Somebody else can probably answer more in-depth. I'm just starting to learn theory, and it's good practice for me to answer other people's questions. =)
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#4
i dont know much about theory myself, but i remember someone on the forums saying they are not the same, they just happen to have the same notes.
#5
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i dont know much about theory myself, but i remember someone on the forums saying they are not the same, they just happen to have the same notes.
Yup.

They contain the exact same notes, but the scales do not start on the same notes, nor are they used in the same situations. A minor has a root of A and is in the key of A minor. C major has a root of C and is in the key of C major.
#6
Quote by stevilkinevil
i dont know much about theory myself, but i remember someone on the forums saying they are not the same, they just happen to have the same notes.


And they are correct. Besides if they were the same, why would they have different names?

Threadstarter, yes they do have the same notes but sound completely different as they have different intervals.
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#7
thanks for all the answers guys, i guess this is one to ask my teacher about
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Jarrett Moore; oh, ...far out.


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#8
^Granted you play them correctly...

What I mean is, if you play the Cmajor scale up and down and then the Aminor scale up and down without any means of resolution or any ounce of melody, they'll sound the exact same. Your brain won't really able to distinguish them. But, people don't just run up and down the scales mindlessly, so it's pretty easy to avoid.
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#9
They are in different keys, have different root notes, different intervals, and completely different backing chords.
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