#1
I really have a hard time counting time signatures. I recorded 2 riffs, can someone please tell me what time signature they are in? They are both in the one file I have up.

http://huk.dmusic.com/
#2
I have no idea, but are influenced by megadeth?
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#3
Second one is 4/4 for sure.
1st one i have no idea.
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#4
Quote by huk
I really have a hard time counting time signatures. I recorded 2 riffs, can someone please tell me what time signature they are in? They are both in the one file I have up. http://huk.dmusic.com/
Riff #1 is in 9/8 and riff #2, as Briteless says, is in 4/4.
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#5
yeah 9/8
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#6
I want to revise my post. I think the first riff alternates between 4/8 and 5/8.
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
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#7
Quote by gpb0216
I want to revise my post. I think the first riff alternates between 4/8 and 5/8.


When you alternate between 4/8 and 5/8 isn't it the same as 9/8? Or are the accented notes on different beats and such?
#8
Quote by Tsunoyukami
When you alternate between 4/8 and 5/8 isn't it the same as 9/8? Or are the accented notes on different beats and such?
You have to remember that time signatures are not fractions. It makes perfect sense to say that 3/4 is the same as 6/8 since they are equivelent fractions, but the two meters are very different. 4/8+9/8 will have the same number of beats as 9/8, but the accents will be different. I might choose to write it in 9/8 for simplicity (instead of changing meter every measure), but that may not be the best way to denote the accents.

Gbp can explain this better than I can. He's kind of our meter-guru.
#9
Quote by bangoodcharlote
You have to remember that time signatures are not fractions. It makes perfect sense to say that 3/4 is the same as 6/8 since they are equivelent fractions, but the two meters are very different. 4/8+9/8 will have the same number of beats as 9/8, but the accents will be different. I might choose to write it in 9/8 for simplicity (instead of changing meter every measure), but that may not be the best way to denote the accents.

Gbp can explain this better than I can. He's kind of our meter-guru.


Ahh thanks, I understand I was just checking to see if I was right. I'm not a fna of playign in weird time signatures personally (I prefer 4/4, 6/8, 2/4).

I really have a bad thing with 3/4 though, I usually group the two abrs together so that I read it in 6/4 - it feels easier for me (I'm not very good at sight-reading )
#10
Quote by bangoodcharlote
You have to remember that time signatures are not fractions. It makes perfect sense to say that 3/4 is the same as 6/8 since they are equivelent fractions, but the two meters are very different. 4/8+9/8 will have the same number of beats as 9/8, but the accents will be different. I might choose to write it in 9/8 for simplicity (instead of changing meter every measure), but that may not be the best way to denote the accents. Gbp can explain this better than I can. He's kind of our meter-guru.
Thank you for your kind words, but your explanation was right on the money.

As many times as I've posted on the differences between simple and compound time, you'd think I'd be careful with a possible 9/8 time signature. But no, I walked all over this one. The first riff is most definitely in simple time and 4/8 alternating with 5/8 reflects this simplicity (although the riff itself is pretty complex rhythmically).

A 9/8 signature, however, represents compound time, and this first riff is not even in the same solar system as compound time. It's worth remembering that this simple vs. compound distinction has nothing whatsoever to do with the riff's complexity. Instead, it has everything to do with the rhythm's feel. If the riff felt like three beats composed of triplets, it would be 9/8. Yes, there are nine eighth-notes in the riff, but no triplet-feeling beats to be found anywhere. As it is, the riff indeed consists of the equivalent of nine eighth notes, but because it's simple time we need to divide it into two sets of simple signatures, and to my ear it sounds like a 4/8 measure followed by a 5/8 measure.

This probably seems like we're debating how many angels can dance on the head of a pin. Quite frankly, if I were scoring this for my band I'd probably avoid the hassle of writing a continuing stream of 4/8 + 5/8 measures and just notate it as 9/8. There, my dirty secret is out there for all to see - I'm actually quite pragmatic. Please don't tell anybody else, though.

Thanks for the cool riff and the excellent discussion.

All the best
gpb
All things are difficult before they are easy.
- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
Quote by Freepower
For everything you need to know - gpb0216.