#1
This didn't really fit anywhere else so I decided to post it here.
I'm not the best with all this technical hardware but I'm starting to get myself a little recording setup going and I'd like to know about microphones.
- What to get for what job?
- What are condensers suited for?
- What are dynamics suited for?
- Anything I need to know?
Thanks for your time,
GLandolina
#2
you'll get more help in the recording forum, there is a sticky there that goes into detail about recording gear.
"The fool doth think he is wise, but the wiseman knows himself to be a fool." - W.S.
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#3
Dynamics are best suited for high SPL instruments and applications. As with speakers, the larger the diaphram (as to a cone in a speaker) the better it will produce low end frequencies but trading off high frequency sesitivity. In most cases this is a good thing.

Condensers are accurate across the entire audio frequency range (in most cases), and are generally more sensitive than dynamics. If you have something that is dynamic and relitively quite then a condenser will pick it up. Condensers are used for micing cymbals, accoustic instruments and some vocal styles. A condenser will pick up a person humming from a few feet away, where most dynamics will not. Condensers will overload if you use them in high SPL applications, but you can move the mic further back from the sound source to minimize this. This starts leaning towards area micing, in which condesers are well suited.

Ribbon Mics are also quite popular, but they are delicate, so don't try throwing it in a kick drum or amything like that, they are generally used for Vocals and general area micing.

An sm58 (the same mic as an SM57 only it has a pop filter - the foam in the ball) and a good vocal condenser would be a good place to start. If you are laying drum tracks then you are going to need to start laying out some real money.

The 58 is good for Vocals of certain styles, and it will work well on a guitar amp. If you want a 57, just take the ball off and your set. Don't get a Beta 58, get the original - the Beta's are a little too Harsh in the 2-4K region.

With these two mics you can use the 58 to get the isolated sound of your amp, and the condenser to mic to room. Record them to seperate tracks so you can mix them individually at any time.

How you mount the mics is very important when recording - don't let someone hold the 58 while they are singing, and use isolated stands to keep the mic neutral.