#1
Does such a scale/key exist? My buddy came up with a little tune using these notes:

Part 1: E F# A G# F# E (key of E major)

Part 2: C D C B (key of C)

Now, to get all these notes in one scale, I could take the E major scale and flatten the 6 and 7:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
E F# G# A B C# D# E

to

1 2 3 4 5 b6 b7 8
E F# G# A B C D E

What scale has all the notes from the modified major scale? Am I thinking in the wrong key? Or is it simply a modulation from E major to C major?
#2
I'd treat it is a change of key.

If you wanted to name the scale for a single key, it'd be E Mixolydian b6, the 5th mode of E melodic minor.
Looking for my India/Django.
#3
Alright, that's what I was thinking. I'm just looking for a starting point to embellish upon this little tune he came up with. Thanks for the response.
#4
Quote by redwing_suck
I'd treat it is a change of key.

If you wanted to name the scale for a single key, it'd be E Mixolydian b6, the 5th mode of E melodic minor.


its quite rare someone actually puts that mode into use
#5
Yes, most people use the fourth mode (lydian dominant) instead.

I've never had a satisfying explanation why (other than"it sounds better").
#6
Quote by Nick_
Yes, most people use the fourth mode (lydian dominant) instead.

I've never had a satisfying explanation why (other than"it sounds better").
The augmented 4th is more common in jazz than a b6 I guess. Certainly, b6 is enharmonic to #5 which is plenty common in jazz, but to have both a natural and augmented fifth (since #5=b6) would be weird. I'm just thinking of something logical; I really have no idea.