#1
i just bought a new condenser mic (audio technica av2020), and it sounds great, but i cant record anything loud on it because it constantly peaks. i turned the volume and gain down on the mixer, but it still shows it as peaking. when i turn it down on the mixer it does make it quieter on my computer, but it still peaks but its just quiet. my setup is so:

mic > mixer > firebox > computer

ive noticed the same problem at other sessions with my friends who own condenser mics. any help?
#2
I don't see it on Musician's Friend...but that's probably not the point.

It probably has to do with the distance of the mic from the source of sound, and what the source of sound is. I've used primarily the AKG C1000S, just for live stereo recordings of concert bands/choirs/orchestras, and the mics are usually about 20 ft. from the stage. Put the same mic 3 inches from a halfstack, and it probably would peak like crazy.
#3
I'm surprised you can argue that it sounds great with it constantly peaking.

Either the source is too close, or the gain is too high.
#5
Quote by take_it_t
I'm surprised you can argue that it sounds great with it constantly peaking.

Either the source is too close, or the gain is too high.


it sounds great from what ive heard with my quieter instruments (acoustic guitar, etc)
#7
ok, sorry i forgot a letter.

its from my amp, and my drums. both are clipping. ill try from further away. i just wanted to know if there was something i didnt know about that was making it clip so bad.
#8
Condenser mics are generally not recommended for that application. Dynamic mics, particularly the Shure SM57, are the industry standard for guitar amps. You should also have dynamics on about 80% of a drumset, with a condenser overhead to pick up cymbals, and maybe on the hi-hat. Micing the hi-hat isn't always necessary because nearby mics (usually snare) will often pick that up.
#9
"Condenser microphones require power from a battery or external source. The resulting audio signal is stronger signal than that from a dynamic. Condensers also tend to be more sensitive and responsive than dynamics, making them well-suited to capturing subtle nuances in a sound. They are not ideal for high-volume work, as their sensitivity makes them prone to distort".

I dont know maybe check the battery or the phantom power that is supplying the mic.

But like the other guy said and this article condensor mics are really not the way to go for drums or guitar...
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#10
I use an overhead condenser drums and and often one on my amp too.

They're very sensitive. That's it, really.
I'm not very active here on UG currently.
I'm a retired Supermod off to the greener pastures of the real world.
#11
Go get a Sennheiser E609. They are great. and not very expensive
My Gear
Fender Strat ('97American Lonestar HSS)
Ibanez RGTHRG1
B-52 AT100
Marshall1960A Cab
Marshall 1960B Cab
#12
oh i didnt know57's were dynamics, i thought they were a type of condenser. i dont really have to money for one but ill look into it as a future purpose. ill continue to use my condenser for vocals and overheading for the drums. it sounds good with my acoustic guitar i find.