#1
So, I know the basic Major scale shape and Minor scale shape, as well as the Blues Pent scale.. My question is this :

I understand that a certain scale can be played all the way up the neck, but do not quite understand how the shape-change of the scale works, and in what positions it moves up the neck.. Is there a diagram/site somewhere that explains this in a non-complicated way?

Hope that makes sense

Thanks

-W0lf
#3
What Im trying to get at is say... Im playing the Am Blues pentatonic scale. I know how to play it in the primary position, but I also know there is more to be played within the same scale up the neck (progression?), but it's still in the same scale, not actually moving into a totally different one..

Seen it done a few times and had it explained to me for what it is, but can't quite figure it out.
#4
I know what you mean but i'm not sure either. I think its something to do with what order the notes come in when you play the scale. Sorry if that seems obvious but i'm just trying to help.
#5
You can transpose the basic scale pattern up and down the neck and the root note changes accordingly. To extend the scale all you need to do is learn the intervals between the notes and identify all the occurences of the root note on the neck.

For example, when you play the A minor pentatonic scale at the 5th fret it strictly finishes on the 7th fret of the D string....that's the octave of the root. That octave is the root of the next occurence of the scale pattern, so you can either continue to play the pattern you've learned at the 5th fret, or simply shift your index finger to that note and play the original pattern as dictated by the intervals between the notes. Remember that the pattern won't be exactly the same becasue the B string is tuned to a 4th fret interval, not 5th. You have to adjust the fingering to ensure you keep the intervals between notes the same.

You also have an A at the 12 fret of the A string, so you can start your scale pattern there, the 17th fret on the E string etc. You can also use the lower notes that extend back from the scale, just repeating the same pattern of intervals - it doesn't matter if there isn't another A to go down to, the notes will still fit.
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#6
for the minor pentatonic, there are 5 shapes that you learn, and you put them together and they go all the way up the fretboard. If your in the key of A, you can begin your scale on the 5th fret with the "blues" scale shape, then move to the next shape, then the next...
#7
I think learning them as shapes is the wrong way to go - it makes it seem like they exist in isolation when effectively it's just one continuous pattern. You can use the patterns that appear to help you when improvising, but the most important thing is to understand the intervals between the notes, that way you can play your scales anywhere.
Actually called Mark!

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#8
your just re-aranging the ntoes to accend up the fret board ...
you have your standard A Blues scales played on A of low E string... you get that box pattern.
you can take those Notes and change it so it accends on one string, 2 etc ... you need to know the fretbaord notes & the notes of the scalce ... then things will make sence
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