#1
I have a question about tapping and hammer-ons and stuff. whenever i play things that switch between hammer-ons and just regular picking there is a great sound difference between the 2 techniques. I was wondering if i'm doing anything wrong or that my setup is bad. Do i need to use a volumpedal to get the two techniques sounding equally loud ? And is it easier to hammer-on strings that are close to the fretboard or the other way round ? I already hammer them pretty hard but if i hammer them even harder i can't play fast enough anymore.
my gear:
- Caliber limited edition strat copy
- Martinez acoustic
- Ibanez GRG-170 DX
- Rp 150 by digitech
- 35 watt cool amp
- 25 watt megatone amp
- 2 straps
#2
I don't really know much about volumpedals or whatever, or whether it is easier to hammer-on strings that are close to the fretboard or the other way round,

But I know that when i learned to hammer on and tap there was a big difference in sound to picking the note normally, but now it is almost the same. It comes down, in part at least to having practice at it, as well as developing a calous(sp?) on your fingers which helps you hammer on with more strength, I noticed it when i learned to tap, I could already hammer on, and the tapping just sounded like crap until i developed a calous.
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#3
If there's a large difference in volume, one of two things is happening. Either you're not hammering hard enough, or you're picking way too hard.
#4
Quote by Stijntjen
-
- I was wondering if i'm doing anything wrong or that my setup is bad. Do i need to use a volumpedal to get the two techniques sounding equally loud ? And is it easier to hammer-on strings that are close to the fretboard or the other way round ? I already hammer them pretty hard but if i hammer them even harder i can't play fast enough anymore.

It's normal.

1) Tapping/Hammering doesn't pump the same energy in the string for it to vibrate with the same amplitude as picking it.

2) When you pick a string, you cause a maximum displacement where you pick it, before this maximum displacement slides to it's position of balance, which is the spot found in the middle of the length of the vibrating string, at the same distance from the bridge and from where the string is fretted.

This has the effect that the pickups don't pick up the same amount of energy when tapping compared to picking, and the neck pickup picking up most of the amplitude variations when the spot of maximum displacement moves from where you pick or tap to it's spot of balance.

Additionally, the spot of balance of maximum displacement moves at every hammer-on or tap so it is not possible to achieve a constant level of output between notes without some external help.

To achieve the least change of sound when you shift from picking to tapping, use the bridge pickup.

To reduce the drop of volume when shifting from picking to tapping you need to have some level of compression and some signal level boosting like a medium to hi-gain overdrive already engaged while your picking.

If you don't use any overdrive while picking, you need at least to engage a signal booster to compensate the drop of volume when shifting from picking to tapping.
Last edited by ColdGin at Jan 13, 2007,
#5
Quote by ColdGin
It's normal.

1) Tapping/Hammering doesn't pump the same energy in the string for it to vibrate with the same amplitude as picking it.

2) When you pick a string, you cause a maximum displacement where you pick it, before this maximum displacement slides to it's position of balance, which is the spot found in the middle of the length of the vibrating string, at the same distance from the bridge and from where the string is fretted.

This has the effect that the pickups don't pick up the same amount of energy when tapping compared to picking, and the neck pickup picking up most of the amplitude variations when the spot of maximum displacement moves from where you pick or tap to it's spot of balance.

Additionally, the spot of balance of maximum displacement moves at every hammer-on or tap so it is not possible to achieve a constant level of output between notes without some external help.

To achieve the least change of sound when you shift from picking to tapping, use the bridge pickup.

To reduce the drop of volume when shifting from picking to tapping you need to have some level of compression and some signal level boosting like a medium to hi-gain overdrive already engaged while your picking.

If you don't use any overdrive while picking, you need at least to engage a signal booster to compensate the drop of volume when shifting from picking to tapping.


:snyper: Couldnt have said it better myself. You can make the tapping and hammer ons sound stronger by pulling off harder than usual, and the extra force will carry over into your taps or hammer ons, depending on how fast you play the notes.
#6
Quote by insideac
:snyper: Couldnt have said it better myself.
:snyper:

You can make the tapping and hammer ons sound stronger by pulling off harder than usual, and the extra force will carry over into your taps or hammer ons, depending on how fast you play the notes.

But unfortunately at the risk of sounding occasionally sharp.
#7
Quote by ColdGin
:snyper:

But unfortunately at the risk of sounding occasionally sharp.



This is true. Threadstarter, be sure not to pull off TOO hard, or else you will either bend the note, or slip off the side of the neck .
#8
Quote by insideac
This is true. Threadstarter, be sure not to pull off TOO hard, or else you will either bend the note, or slip off the side of the neck .


Wipe-Out !!!