#1
OK so you use the same box shapes as the Minor Pentatonic I get that part. But how do you make it Major? Just change the root note or something? I am lost lol.

Thanks very much.
Elliot Waters


My Gear:
Epiphone Limited Edition SG with Maestro Tremolo
Novaro Acoustic (not good)
#2
I would asume you just unflat the 3rd tone, if you know how to do that (my theory is still pretty basic).
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#5
To keep it simple: You play the minor pentatonic patterns a minor third below the major key. So, if the song is in G, you play Em pentatonic. Find the key, move down 3 frets and get those box patterns working. Check out Eric Clapton's Wonderful Tonight for an easy to play example.
#6
Quote by oZone_TNS
the second position of the minor is major I think


The second note of your first position minor pentatonic is the major key you can play it in.
#7
To get a major pentatonic, take the relative minor pentatonic (C major = A minor, C# major = A# minor, D major = B minor, etc.) and, instead of starting at the root, start at the third and end at the tenth (octave of the third).

Example: A minor pentatonic - A C D E G a
C major pentatonic - C D E G A c
#8
OK let me see. I will use Back in Black by AC/DC for an example as I am familar with it. So the song is in the key of E I think (no idea really but I THINK that is right). So if I wanted to improvise over this using the Major Pentatonic scale I would use the same boxes as the Minor Pent and the root note would be a G is that right?

Thanks for the help guys I think (hope) I am getting it.
Elliot Waters


My Gear:
Epiphone Limited Edition SG with Maestro Tremolo
Novaro Acoustic (not good)
#9
the root note is different... the root note for a major would be what ever ur pinky lands on.. eg: 5th fret = A major

for minor the root note would be determend by ur first finger (can't think of what it is called)
on the 2nd fret it would be a F# and u can still use that same scale without moving for A minor... well thats what my teacher taught me (dont mind the spelling lol)
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#10
Quote by go_knights
OK let me see. I will use Back in Black by AC/DC for an example as I am familar with it. So the song is in the key of E I think (no idea really but I THINK that is right). So if I wanted to improvise over this using the Major Pentatonic scale I would use the same boxes as the Minor Pent and the root note would be a G is that right?

Thanks for the help guys I think (hope) I am getting it.


Major pentatonic sounds silly on Back in Black, but if that's what you want to try...
The main chords for B In B are E, D, and A. That would make this the key of A. So, find an A and go down three notes, 3 frets, a minor 3rd, or whatever way you want to think of it. That note is F#. Now play your F# minor pentatonic scale over the regular E,D,A chord changes. Sounds silly, right? But that's what you asked for.
You cannot change the chords of the song to fit the scale you want to play! You pick a scale that fits the chords and style of the music.

To everyone who tried to help this guy out, but didn't really know the answer, Shut the **** Up Next Time!
#11
Quote by ZootCst
Major pentatonic sounds silly on Back in Black, but if that's what you want to try...
The main chords for B In B are E, D, and A. That would make this the key of A. So, find an A and go down three notes, 3 frets, a minor 3rd, or whatever way you want to think of it. That note is F#. Now play your F# minor pentatonic scale over the regular E,D,A chord changes. Sounds silly, right? But that's what you asked for.
You cannot change the chords of the song to fit the scale you want to play! You pick a scale that fits the chords and style of the music.

To everyone who tried to help this guy out, but didn't really know the answer, Shut the **** Up Next Time!


OK thanks. So one more question then I think I will have it. So what would be the root note when playing the Minor Pentatonic at F#?

Thanks so much I am starting to get it. Thanks a million!
Elliot Waters


My Gear:
Epiphone Limited Edition SG with Maestro Tremolo
Novaro Acoustic (not good)
#12
It would be A. I believe I said that already, but that's OK. The key of A uses A,D,and E as it's main chords. What are the main chords of Back in Black? E, D, and A... See?

Since A is the "root" note, go down three frets to F# (this is the "relative minor") and start there (second fret on your low E string) using your first position minor pentatonic scale.
You are now playing an F# minor pentatonic over the key of A. That's the major pentatonic you were asking for.

Seriously, check out Wonderful Tonight by Eric Clapton. This is an EZ example. The lead part is mostly Em pentatonic, but the song is in G. Listen to the Allman Brothers. They made the "happy" pentatonic one of the main tools for their sound.
#13
Quote by ZootCst
It would be A. I believe I said that already, but that's OK. The key of A uses A,D,and E as it's main chords. What are the main chords of Back in Black? E, D, and A... See?

Since A is the "root" note, go down three frets to F# (this is the "relative minor") and start there (second fret on your low E string) using your first position minor pentatonic scale.
You are now playing an F# minor pentatonic over the key of A. That's the major pentatonic you were asking for.

Seriously, check out Wonderful Tonight by Eric Clapton. This is an EZ example. The lead part is mostly Em pentatonic, but the song is in G. Listen to the Allman Brothers. They made the "happy" pentatonic one of the main tools for their sound.


OK I got it worked out thankyou very very much!

Thanks to everyone!
Elliot Waters


My Gear:
Epiphone Limited Edition SG with Maestro Tremolo
Novaro Acoustic (not good)
#14
The most famous solo I can think of that's written in a major pentatonic is that of Let it Be by The Beatles; the initial solo does a great job of using the C major pentatonic scale (although I personally prefer the solo from the original version of Let it Be, keep in mind there are two).
#15
Aminor Pent.

|5---8<---Added tonal 3rd
|5---8
|5--7
|5--7<--Root
|5--7
|5---8
^
Root

Amajor Pent.

|2---5
|2---5
|2--4 <The 2nd fret is a Root.
|2--4
|2--4
|2---5<--Root
^
Added tonal 6th

Start from the roots, then you can continue on from the tonals.

Minor Pent is used mainly in blues and rock, which i guess you already know, but I've heard that major pent is used in country, but i could've heard wrong.
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Last edited by AssassinLoki090 at Jan 14, 2007,
#16
To make it major you just use the

Minor Pentatonic's 5th position as the 1st
Minor Pentatonic's 1st position as the 2nd
Minor Pentatonic's 2nd position as the 3rd
Minor Pentatonic's 3rd position as the 4th
& Minor Pentatonic's 4th position as the 5st

I do believe, I may be wrong though.
#17
Hey, Fragy, are you TRYING to confuse the poor guy? I'm a guitar Teacher and I'm not sure what you're trying to say.. The 5st??

Go back and read my earlier posts on this thread.

EDIT:
Assassin, You've almost got it.
Last edited by ZootCst at Jan 14, 2007,