#1
Would you advice a fretless bass for a first bass? I'm a guitarist and I'd like to take up bass. I've played in basses before, but the one I'm considering is an old fretless bass that an old neighbour might sell me.
Can fretless instruments do the same as fretted basses?
#3
ive always heard from experienced bassists not to have a fretless as your first bass because its harder to play but if you already play guitar and if its your neighbours i presume youve tried it so ya i dont see a problem fretless basses can do everything a fretted bass can do
#4
Quote by achtung baby
ive always heard from experienced bassists not to have a fretless as your first bass because its harder to play but if you already play guitar and if its your neighbours i presume youve tried it so ya i dont see a problem fretless basses can do everything a fretted bass can do


except slap and pop if you dont know what youre doing
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#7
It's an old bass, and I'll settle down once the novelty sets in and stop doing that so much.
#8
then i see no reason why you shouldnt get it
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#9
Nothing to stop you. I don't really think fretless basses are much harder to play. However I personally dislike the tone of them, but then again some people much prefer their tone
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#10
Hmm if you can get it for a good price, go for it. Nothing stopping you. But it would be better if you started with a fretted bass just to get the feeling of it, knowing the neck and having the technique.
#11
I'm considering bass as a hobby, so I have plenty of time and will to face the challenge of mastering a fretless bass's neck.
#12
I think fretless is a great choice. When you switch back to fretted, it seems too easy.
#13
If you want to try it, go for it by all means. Is the neck lined at all? Or does it have side dots?
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#14
Why not? You're ear will probably develop better and you'll be taking care of a large jump early. It can't do everything a fretted can do, though. Different sound altogether.
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#15
And as for slap and pop if you're fretboard isn't crappy, it should be fine, if you use flatwounds.
#16
It'll be a steeper learning curve but in the end you'll have progressed a lot faster. So if you're willing to take the extra time learning the left hand positions then go for it.
#17
I haven't got it in my hands, but I think it's just dotted, no lines. Since a bass's fretboard is bigger than the guitar's, is that the first fret or the third?
#18
The dots always start at the third "fret", whether it's side dots or inlay dots with lines on the board.
Gear:
SX SJB62-5 5-String Fretless Jazz Copy (EADGC)
Ibanez GSR200 4-String Fretted (BEAD)
Ibanez IBZ10B 10 Watt Practice Combo Amp
DR Stainless Steel Lo-Riders
Yamaha Air Cell Straps
#19
It all depends on what kinda music you want to play, I got a fretless and a fretted.
I think alot of Jazz bassists prefer fretless.
#20
Quote by IndianRockStar
And as for slap and pop if you're fretboard isn't crappy, it should be fine, if you use flatwounds.


Your fingerboard will be fine if you use roundwounds, as long as you have a harder fingerboard wood (IME, ebony and rosewood are two of the harder woods, and the type of maple that's usually used for fingerboards is a bit softer.) You won't have much fingerboard damage after a couple years other than cosmetic. And if the grooves in the board get deep, you can just sand your fingerboard down and re-epoxy it to protect it.

In my opinion, slapping and flatwounds don't mix - flats are too dull and thumpy to get a decent slap tone out of. Just my opinion, though.

Fretless basses aren't for everything, though it is personal taste.. Granted, you can make a fretless sound somewhat like a fretted (by changing your technique and EQing differently) if you need it, however IMO fretless just sound so much better in a lot of things. I personally play death metal and I absolutely love the tone I get off my fretless for it, however another person may not.

Quote by achtung baby
ive always heard from experienced bassists not to have a fretless as your first bass because its harder to play but if you already play guitar and if its your neighbours i presume youve tried it so ya i dont see a problem fretless basses can do everything a fretted bass can do


That's wrong imo. Who would these "experienced bassists" be? Fretless basses would imo be easier to play on, despite the learning curve of an unlined fingerboard (if you get one without lines.) It develops your ear and muscle memory better than playing a fretted bass from the start would. I started with a fretted bass, and didn't make the switch to fretless for a year.

My ear, in the last year with a fretless, has developed 10x more than it did with a fretted - because I have to listen to what I'm playing, rather than relying on the frets to guide me. And even then, because of equal temperament, the higher frets (after around the 13th or 14th) aren't quite exactly in tune.
Gear:
SX SJB62-5 5-String Fretless Jazz Copy (EADGC)
Ibanez GSR200 4-String Fretted (BEAD)
Ibanez IBZ10B 10 Watt Practice Combo Amp
DR Stainless Steel Lo-Riders
Yamaha Air Cell Straps
Last edited by vashts80 at Jan 14, 2007,