#1
my mom has this old guitar. she asked me to put a set of strings on it because it had been sitting around without any for a while and she didnt want to ruin the neck by letting it sit to long without strings. so i decided to put a set of ol electric strings on it. the where heavy so it would be ok because its about the same guage as acoustic strings. when she got it out i noticed it had a classical nylon string guitar type head stock. i was thinking, uh oh, maybe this needs nylon strings. but then i saw that there was no place to tie the strings, it had a bridge with pins like a regular acoustic. i was still unsure about putting the strings on so i checked and i couldnt find where to adjust the truss rod if it even has one. so what kind of strings would this use? my mom said that she never used nylon strings on it but i have a feeling my set of 12's might be too much for it. does it maybe just have a truss rod that i cant adjust? would i just have to find a light set of acoustic strings for this?
#3
i dunno ive heard that guitars a built to have the neck under tension and when its not under that tension for to long it can make the neck flat or something. im not to worried about but i just dont know what kind of strings this thing uses.
#5
Electric strings on an acoustic sound like shite. I'd say try and find some extra-light acoustic strings and see how it handles those, Martin and Elixir both make extra-lights, try and find those. The slotted peghead thing isn't too rare, some older Martins have them, and alot of people making custom OM style guitars use them.

DON'T adjust the truss rod yourself unless you know exactly what you are doing and how much of a turn you need to produce the desired effect, it's way to easy for people who don't know what they're doing to over turn and ruin the neck. Unless the guitar was built crappy to start with, it should be fine, look at all the older guitars that are being discovered in older relatives closets and brought back into the light of day. If it's a higher end brand of guitar, you might check the humidity, but unless your seeing severe signs, it's best to leave it alone.
Gear:

Fender Mexi Fat Strat
2005 Taylor 614ce


Fender MIM J-Bass Fretless
Last edited by FenderKid87 at Jan 14, 2007,
#6
Stop! Only put classical (nylon) strings on it. Do NOT put anything other than what it was designed for. Many acoustic strings come with balls on the end. I my classical/beater has Martin Classical Nylons on it. Just pull it through and tie it through the headstock like normal.
#7
ok no offence but it seems like some of you didnt even read my post.

1) i cant adjust the truss rod because i cant find where it is. so im wondering if it had one. if not then i probably shouldnt put regular acoustics on. but i was looking around at guitars and ive seen some that have no where to adjust the truss rod but still have regluar strings on and one of those classical style head stocks.
2) i cant use nylons because the bridge is not built for tying the ends of nylon strings. plus, my mom said it never had nylon string on it.
#8
Ahh, you're right. I didn't read carefully - sorry. So anyways a few comments for you that might be a little more helpful. Where have you all looked for the truss rod? Many acoustics are located inside the body so it wouldn't be something thats obvious. I'm not sure what kind of bridge you mean. Does it have bridge pins like most acoustics? As for strings I'd suggest some lights. Ones meant for an acoustic guitar, that is .. not electric. If you're absolutely sure its not a classical guitar then light gauge strings won't hurt it. Mediums or heavy would be a bigger risk.

Do you happen to know the manufacturer or model of the guitar? That might help a bit. Maybe post up a few screenshots too, if you can. I'm mostly interested in seeing the headstock and the bridge.
#9
yea i looked inside the body as well. and yea it has bridge pins. ill see if i can get a shot of it. its some 50 year old guitar. i cant find a name on it.