#1
I've searched for the definition of this term for a while now, but I can't seem to find it. Could anyone explain it to me? How do I go about wet sanding a guitar's body? When do I wet sand? What is it's purpose?

Thanks for the feedback!
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#2
Its litterally what it says, you add water to your sanding process, pretty sure it makes the sanding less, "rough" so to to speak
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#4
Ok, thanks BigBrownBeaver And LPMarshall!

How much water should I use, though?
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#5
It's better not to use water as it can make wood swell. I've heard baby oil or something is a good liquid to use.
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#6
slightly confusing this, but ok. So [pinkqueen] , you're saying that I SHOULDN'T USE WATER ? Okay. But wouldn't baby oil adversely affect any coat of paint that I'm wet sanding?

i'm really new at this, so please bear with me. Thanks.
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#7
I've never sanded with baby oil, but yeah. If water comes into contact with wood it can swell and then crack the finish or something. Baby oil shouldn't affect the coat you are sanding, and as long as you clean it off it should be fine to spray over it.
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#8
wet sanding just cleans off the dust particles from the grit isnt it?
and if you have an electric sander i dont thin kyou need to do it
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#9
well, wet sanding produces a really smooth finish to it. For example, when adding heatinks to my pc, I wet sanded one side to prevent it from scratching anything, and also conducting heat unevenly. Wet sanding will produces a "gloss" like finish as opposed to a matte finish with dry.

Same effect as a water powered tile cutter, the water prevents rough edges.
#10
Soak the sandpaper (it has to be wet/dry sandpaper) in water for about an hour, and re-dip it in water (keep a cup close by) whenever it becomes dry.

I wouldn't use wetsanding unless the guitar was already sealed, but that's just me . If the guitar is sealed, I don't see a problem with it (I'm doing it on my tele now).
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#11
Oooo ... alright alright i get it. Thanks FacingUsAll. How would I know if a guitar was already sealed? thanks again!
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#12
yeah, theres no reason to wetsand on the wood surface... pinkqueen is just being weird.

Normally you wet sand the body after the final clearing. During the buffing stage. You wet sand the body to take out any last scratchesi n the body. Soak the paper in water for at least an hour and dip it in the water every so often so the paper can glide across the body freely.
#13
To add on what Kaplac said :
Wood : go up to 240 grit (dry). That's baby arse smooth already.
Once it has paint on it (or primer, or whatever you use) and you need to scruff it up or get a paint drop out etc.. Use 800grit. This has to be wet (I think everything above 500 or 600 needs to be wet), the water is a lubricant and will help the paper NOT to get clogged up after 2 scratches.
In the final stage, use 800 to make it all smooth and regular, then either 1500 and then 2000 or go direct to 2000 if you think it's good enough. Then use rubbing compound and you'll have a mirror.. Remember, everything above 500 or 600 NEEDS to be wet, but you do NOT wet sand on wood. It is completely useless and could ruin your guitar.
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#14
Whistler, Kaplac and everyone else - Thank you! Time to get a cheapo russian sander.

btw Whistler, Blackadder is the sh*t!
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#15
FacingUsAll, kaplac, Whistler, etc. have all posted very useful information but in case anybody else cares, I just wanted to add a little more detail from what I've learned and/or read and/or been told, etc.

I've soaked the wet/dry fine grit sandpaper overnight, specifically the 1500 and 2000, which are used in the final stages of colorcoating and clearcoating. A few of you are familiar with my fondness for masking, stenciling, etc. although I really prefer Vintage Strat colors

There's a tendency for color or clear to build up when working on multi-color designs or graphics, no matter how careful/conservative you are when laying down or misting color on top of color. With masking, or where color boundaries are sharper, the top color will tend to create a demarcation line.

The top color may look flush with the bottom color *but* if you run your finger over it, you will feel the demarcation lines. This is where the wetsanding becomes important. It's gentler to the finish than the dry or quickly-wtted fine grit sandpaper.

Since planning ahead is so critical to complex, multi-color painting designs, it's worth it to soak your fine grit sandpaper overnight, instead of just a few hours. For those who have different experiences, consider that the above are just my opinions based on a limited number of mods from a non-pro ... so, better safe than sorry.

Good Luck!