#1
I'm wondering when would be the best time of the year to buy a guitar that is made in Korea with mahogany wood. Not from a financial point of view, but would the wood quality in Korea be better in colder seasons or warmer seasons? In the summer, the wood is mainly dry and in the winter it is mainly wet.
Also, I found the guitar got higher ratings during summer months than winter months, so maybe the wood quality is better during summer months, any help is appreciated.
#2
It'd be really hard to gauge that, dude. If you buy the guitar in a store, it could have been there for months. And even if you order from the manufacturer, you could get a guitar that is part of a backlog that the distributor has. Not to mention that the wood is often kept in the shop for weeks or months before being used.

That being said, I can't imagine that there would be enough difference to be heard at all. It sounds like a ridiculous wine-sampling kind of thing anyway...

"Aah yes. The wood on this is a nice winter vintage... feels like a 'Late January' to me."

Personally, I'd be more worried about the effect intercontinental shipping would have on the guitar.
no
#3
I really don't think there's actually a difference at all. And I don't think the wood is harvested at the same time the guitar is made, anyway.

EDIT:
Quote by bucky_2300
"Aah yes. The wood on this is a nice winter vintage... feels like a 'Late January' to me."

I'm tempted to sig that...
#5
Wood is harvested at certain 'good' times for that, and it goes through several stages of treatment before actually used. So to answer your question, there's no difference.
Jackson DKMG & KE3, Fender Mexican Strat, Stagg Acoustic

Boss Compressor & Chorus, Dunlop Crybaby, Behringer Delay, ISP Decimator, Ibanez Tubescreamer

Laney TT50H, Marshall 1960A, Roland Cube 15

Looking to jam in Belfast, PM me!
#6
There is no best time to buy a guitar, because stores will charge them at the same price anyway.
Sent from my iPad.
#7
Quote by ar73m
Wood is harvested at certain 'good' times for that, and it goes through several stages of treatment before actually used. So to answer your question, there's no difference.



So would the production of guitars in winter months be stunted since the wood from trees are too damp? Or do they collect all their wood during the dry months?
#8
they collect all the wood when it's good to collect all the wood. Why the **** do you care about when the wood was harvested anyway, I can tell you it makes no difference, especially on Asian Mahongany!!
Current Rig:
Gibson Firebird Studio
Limited Edition Schecter 35th Anniversary C-1
Schecter Jeff Loomis Signature 7 FR
Ashdown Fallen Angel
Custom 7 Firebird from Ignition Custom Guitars (check them out)
ESP Phoenix
#10
Yeah dude, they have to dry the wood anyways, which takes months, so it doesn't matter.
Carvin DC127+Custom Lacewood Build+Godin SD--->Traynor YCV50BLUE

My Build IT'S DONE!
#12
Only buy guitars that have had their wood harvested from the north side of the tree, during the summer solstice, by virgin druids suffering from dwarfism. Next stupid question, please.
#13
Most wood for stringed instruments has been traditionally harvested when it's wettest in order to maintain the highest level of consistency after curing. Some sources say Stradivari was notoriously picky about the specifics of the wood he used (including harvesting times) and his stringed instruments have sold for millions. But at the same time, modern technology has allowed for climate controlled curing processes which can achieve virtually identical results from wood harvested at any time. The age of the tree and the location of the wood to be used within the tree are far more important factors when dealing with the tonal characteristics of the instrument as both of these factors help determine the cellular structure and overall density.
#14
Quote by rexdime
So would the production of guitars in winter months be stunted since the wood from trees are too damp? Or do they collect all their wood during the dry months?



All wood is either kiln dried or air dried before being used for guitars...
Recognized by the Official EG/GG&A Who To Listen To List 2008
Quote by utsapp89
^I'd let a pro look at it. Once you get into the technicalities of screws...well, it's just a place you don't want to be, friend.
#15
Quote by lefty_strat_str
Only buy guitars that have had their wood harvested from the north side of the tree, during the summer solstice, by virgin druids suffering from dwarfism. Next stupid question, please.

I am so very tempted to sig that
#16
Quote by lefty_strat_str
Only buy guitars that have had their wood harvested from the north side of the tree, during the summer solstice, by virgin druids suffering from dwarfism. Next stupid question, please.


lol i think i just might

sheer brilliance. not very nice, but truly humorus things never are

bravo
#17
There's absolutely no way to tell, since the wood has to be dried. Which can take months, or years.
#19
Any major tone differences in woods of the same species has more to do with the location/climate of the tree. Is it from a colder or warmer climate. The harsher the climate, the slower the tree grows, the tighter the tree rings are, which has been said to create a better tone.

As far as the time of the year that the tree is harvested, all wood is either kiln or air dried. As said above this takes months to years for the wood to dry. The moisture content in the end product is the same. You can't build with wet wood, because it isn't stable. The wood might warp as it continues to dry and you don't want that to happen on a finished guitar.