#1
Ok I am totally lost with this and I have been reading it over on the Music Theory the beginning lesson but I still don't get it. What I understand is the following... The circle of fifths is a circle were they are each a perfect fifth away from their clockwise counterpart.


Here was an example:
       
      C
   G       F
 D           Bb
A             Eb
 E           Ab
  B        Db
     F#/Gb
 


Now I understand that c is a perfect fifth away from g in this. From my understanding this is supposed to give you the key signature of the notes. I am a bit lost on the complete purpose of this and I am not finding the lesson I guess clear enough for me. It also said that each time you turn it say you want it to be on F that you add a flat, or if you go backwards your add a sharp, did not really understand that ether :/ Maybe I am making this more complex than I really need to but I am feeling pretty dumb right now so could some one help thx
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Last edited by Sturek at Jan 14, 2007,
#2
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
Last edited by metal4all at Jan 14, 2007,
#3
Quote by Sturek
Ok I am totally lost with this and I have been reading it over on the Music Theory the beginning lesson but I still don't get it. What I understand is the following... The circle of fifths is a circle were they are each a perfect fifth away from their clockwise counterpart.


Here was an example:

C
G F
D Bb
A Eb
E Ab
B Db
F#/Gb

Now I understand that c is a perfect fifth away from g in this. From my understanding this is supposed to give you the key signature of the notes. I am a bit lost on the complete purpose of this and I am not finding the lesson I guess clear enough for me. It also said that each time you turn it say you want it to be on F that you add a flat, or if you go backwards your add a sharp, did not really understand that ether :/ Maybe I am making this more complex than I really need to but I am feeling pretty dumb right now so could some one help thx

You're going to get a lot of responses on this, Sturek, but basically the Co5 boils down to a tool for determining key signatures and tracking relationships among major and minor keys.

You've no doubt read several lessons, and here's one more...

If this doesn't help, keep asking.
gpb
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- Dr. Thomas Fuller (British physician, 1654-1734)
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#4
Quote by metal4all
C is a perfect fourth from G. G is a perfect 5th from C.

How is that helping him, he said he was confused with this.
#5
So perhaps I was going the wrong way on the circle to get the perfect fifth... but still need further explanation on how this works.
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#6
Quote by Zuka
How is that helping him, he said he was confused with this.

I figured i would correct one thing he said while i went back and posted some sites that he could use to help. ...lo siento


here we go:




edit: by looking at that you can see that in the key of G you have 1#, key of D you have 2#'s, etc. If you go back to the lessons i posted earlier they will probably help you out a lot so you can learn what notes exactly are made sharp and all that.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
Last edited by metal4all at Jan 14, 2007,
#7
Ok i think I have it now, so the number of sharps of flats on this circle are the number found in the relative scales?
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Fender Rumble 100
#8
Yes. In the C major scale, there are no sharps. In the key of C, there are no sharps.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#9
Just so i have this right... When stating your playing in the key blah blah that means the playing in the key of said scale? You should only be playing the notes in that scale in other words... SOrry for all the questions want to make sure i understand this correctly.
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Fender Rumble 100
#10
Yes. If you say you're playing in the key of C, the circle says there are no sharps or flats, so you are playing whatever notes you want without playing sharps or flats.

Ask as many questions as you have, it ain't a problem.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#11
Oh wow ok so Perhaps I am not looking at this the right way than... What about say in the key of C# What exactly would I be able to play than? I notice it states it has 7 sharps. Because I guess looking at it normally when I hear some one say play in the key of blahblah they do not normally state major or minor so does this mean that ether scale could be played?
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Schecter C4
Fender Rumble 100
#12
This will tell you the key, number of sharps/flats, and what sharps or flats it has.

C 0#
G 1# F#
D 2# F# C#
A 3# F# C# G#
E 4# F# C# G# D#
B 5# F# C# G# D# A#
F# 6# F# C# G# D# A# E#
C# 7# F# C# G# D# A# E# B#


C 0b
F 1b Bb
Bb 2b Bb Eb
Eb 3b Bb Eb Ab
Ab 4b Bb Eb Ab Db
Db 5b Bb Eb Ab Db Gb
Gb 6b Bb Eb Ab Db Gb Cb
Cb 7b Bb Eb Ab Db Gb Cb Fb

The major scales make up the keys. You can play a minor scale for every key; it contains the same notes as the major scale and is referred to as the "relative minor".

edit: the difference between the major scale and it's relative minor is that the relative minor starts on a different note (the 6th interval up from the major).
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#13
Alright ok nice I think I got it now, lets see if I have this correct :P

Ok when I am playing in the key of say G I can play ether the major scale for it or its relative minor correct? While playing I would use all the notes to the proper scale that I am playing in. Circle of fifths for the most part will give me the key, what the key signature is, (used in musical notation) and give me the number of flats or sharps in the key. It also has each note in perfect fifths as you progress backwards on the circle? so C is a perfect fifth from F and Ab is a perfect fifth from C#?

Hopefully thats all correct.
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#14
I dont want you to think you can ONLY play the major scale and it's relative minor of the key. You can play whatever you want as long as the notes are in key (you can play some notes that arent in key too if you want... whatever sounds good). It seems to me you have grasped the circle of fifths and taken it by the throat and shown it who's boss.


edit: sorry but i have to go for a bit, i'll be on later so if you have any more questions hopefully someone else can help out.

edit2: nvm lol
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
Last edited by metal4all at Jan 14, 2007,
#15
Thank you good sir, for helping me as much as you have and everyone else who did, spent to much time jumping around music theory and spent half the day studying through the beginners stuff and out of the 7 months I have been playing things are starting to make sense! :P
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Ibanez GSR 200
Schecter C4
Fender Rumble 100
#16
No problem dude. I wish i knew about music theory only 7 months into playing. It's great when things start to make sense.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#17
As you move counterclockwise from C (until you hit E)(sorry, I'm a brass player so I tend to see B as Cb and F# as Gb), you add one sharp. As you move clockwise from C, you add one flat. So the key of F has one flat (Bb), the key of G has one sharp (F#). Repeat as necessary.

This is useful for writing chord progressions, because you know which chords you can and can't use. For example, in the key of F, don't put a B chord in, but rather a Bb.