#1
Ok, I have a question about minor pent. scales... I have a book that has a minor pentatonic scale going from the 8th fret to the 11th on the low-E string, then 8 to 10 for the A D and G strings, then 8 and 11 fret for the high E and B strings... So, for the low E you play the 8th fret with 1st finger and 11th fret with 4th, A string 1st finger 8th fret and 3rd finger 10th fret, and so on...

Now, on some other sites I have seen minor pentatonic scales using different patterns. Why is this?? I thought all the scales, regardless in which key basically use the same patterns?? Why are some diff. than others? Thanks a lot for the help everyone.
#2
there are diffrent nodes and also blue notes
I Survived The "Silent Deftone Cocksucking Forum"!-August 15th, 2006
#3
Remember that a scale is just certain notes that are specific intervals apart. For example, the A minor pentatonic scale contains the notes A C D E G. As long as you play those notes, you are playing a passage/solo/melody/lead/whatever that utilizes the A minor pent. scale (disregarding the idea of modes for the moment). It doesn't matter where on the fretboard you find those A, C, D, E, or G notes. The various patterns for scales are simply to make the scales themselves easier to learn. You could play an entire scale on one string, but that wouldn't be much fun!

Try to think of the patterns (usually referred to as "boxes" when we're talking about pentatonic patterns) not as actual scales, but just tools to help you remember where the notes are located.
#4
AKA try and remember the notes and the sound they are making instead of just the patterns and the positions on the fretboard.
ಥ_ಥ
#5
Quote by powerhalf
Remember that a scale is just certain notes that are specific intervals apart. For example, the A minor pentatonic scale contains the notes A C D E G. As long as you play those notes, you are playing a passage/solo/melody/lead/whatever that utilizes the A minor pent. scale (disregarding the idea of modes for the moment). It doesn't matter where on the fretboard you find those A, C, D, E, or G notes. The various patterns for scales are simply to make the scales themselves easier to learn. You could play an entire scale on one string, but that wouldn't be much fun!

Try to think of the patterns (usually referred to as "boxes" when we're talking about pentatonic patterns) not as actual scales, but just tools to help you remember where the notes are located.



Thanks, I appreciate the explenation.