#1
Hello,

This is my first post - so yep be gentle.

Okay, so I have a US-122 usb interface, and a mic for recording.

I'm trying to record some guitar ( pretty heavy distortion I suppose. ) and it sounds pretty bad, I've searched google for some tips and yeah no luck.

What's the best way to do this? Plug the guitar right into the hardware or plug into the amp and then into the hardware or just record it with a mic to the amp? I'd like to get that "Grr!" powerful guitar sound but it always seems to turn out pretty bad.

Thanks!
#2
I havent recorded personally.. but ive read alot of articles about metal bands having to use completely different settings while recording, if you use too much gain, its not going to sound right so make sure that down. If it sounds metal coming out of the amp, chances are that its not going to sound metal while recording.
#3
I know it doesn't help you any but I use a pod 2.0. It sounds good. www.myspace.com/theawakeningjared I've only used it on the one called Traumatized by Hypocrites. Bad song but the tone is cool lol. The other songs were recorded before I got my pod. For those I went and plugged the amp into my USB(m-audio fastrak) hardware. I'm not really sure if this helped you. lol.
#4
Quote by Arkadios
Hello,

This is my first post - so yep be gentle.

Okay, so I have a US-122 usb interface, and a mic for recording.

I'm trying to record some guitar ( pretty heavy distortion I suppose. ) and it sounds pretty bad, I've searched google for some tips and yeah no luck.

What's the best way to do this? Plug the guitar right into the hardware or plug into the amp and then into the hardware or just record it with a mic to the amp? I'd like to get that "Grr!" powerful guitar sound but it always seems to turn out pretty bad.

Thanks!


A lot of crunch comes from the pickup and the amp speaker. The celestion G12H's will give you a lot of crunch since they have that huge ceramic speaker. Then for pickups look for a highly wound high output (but not active) pickup.
but don't take my word as law, I am still learning this stuff, and am probably partially wrong.
Last edited by Schecter1277 at Jan 15, 2007,
#5
So there isn't any way "best" way to get that sound? =\ Just a bunch of tweaks with trial and error I suppose.
#6
Quote by Arkadios
So there isn't any way "best" way to get that sound? =\ Just a bunch of tweaks with trial and error I suppose.


Actually yeah. There are a number of tried and true techniques, so it comes down to personal preference. Like solid state and tube. Digital versus analong.

I quit mic'ing my amp when this cheapo little DI box did better for me than all my years of mic'ing - albeit in a noisy, classless basement. It's a behringer DI Box - with cabinet simulation. Cab sim is what you want when direct recording.

See...mic'ing is the professional way to go - no doubt. Close mic'ing the amp is probably the most popular technique. This captures the natural sound of your rig.

Using the line-out, headphones out of your amp sounds crappy. Because the signal isn't going through the speaker cabinet. It sounds pretty horrible.

However, using the lineout or headphones out to a DI Box with cabinet simulation can sound really damn good. You need something to shape that signal to sound like it's going through some speakers - a cabinet.

So..mic or use a DI box. And with either method, take the time to make lots of adjustments and experiments to get the sound good. Don't forget to take little breaks and keep a professional commercial CD around and re-play it ever now and then so you keep the frequencies straight.
#7
i typically use DI myself, then adjust the settings while wearing the headphones so that you get a true sound as to what is going to be recorded, i use pretty high gain and levels but i also adjust the master volume to a nominal level, a lot of times a good idea for "metal" type sounds would be to use a slightly lower gain level but raise the slave volume to a higher level which produces more natural gain, then adjust the master volume to the correct clipping point. this is what i do and it hasn't failed yet.
#8
Quote by z4twenny
i typically use DI myself, then adjust the settings while wearing the headphones so that you get a true sound as to what is going to be recorded, i use pretty high gain and levels but i also adjust the master volume to a nominal level, a lot of times a good idea for "metal" type sounds would be to use a slightly lower gain level but raise the slave volume to a higher level which produces more natural gain, then adjust the master volume to the correct clipping point. this is what i do and it hasn't failed yet.


I think this technique is working for you because of your amp. I say this because all of my amps have given me different results going DI. My Marshall sounds like shit no matter how I play with the gain and volume settings. My Crate sounded decent, but that was a long time ago.

If it works though, I guess it doesn't matter.
#9
I'm using a line6 Spider II amp ( digital ) and my Tascam us-122 DI. I'm still messing around with my mic, Do you know what my settings should be on my amp or my DI? And which program would you say is the best for doing the recorind itself? Cakewalk? Adobe Audition?
#10
^^I'm biased to Cakewalk. I've used it for years. I don't know squat about Adobe Audition. Cakewalk is made by a dedicated audio sequencing business, with decades under its belt. I can't imagine that Adobe could really compete with that, but I really don't know.