#1
hi.

some guy offered to sell me guitar build quality ash that he said he had kept for 20 years. what difference would this make?

if i could get a piece of wood that is dry, but not old, would it be far worse?

this guy has earned his living since he was 18 (now in 40s) by maintaining and custom building guitars...so any advice would be good. he wants about 80 dollars for it.

not too sure about prices on other woods...since im still shopping for mahogany, trying to get it as cheaply as possible.

any advice would be cool.


ps: i just assume newer woods are cheaper than ones that have been storaged for 20 years.
#2
if the wood has been dried properly it will have a lower moisture content and be more stable. 80 bucks is fair. if you want ash, go for it. if you want mahogany, ash will not produce the same tone.
#3
That seems cheap for the wood to me.

But i've never bought wood before.

As far as things getting better with age, I think tone woods only improve if they've been played on, like, the vibrations change the wood. If it's just been chillin for twenty years it'll probably sound the same as a new piece.
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#4
I definitely wouldn't pay more for it than new wood; this old piece has just been air dried, not kiln dried like newer pieces.
#5
80 is a good price, kiln dried or air dried. besides, wood does get better with age, just ask the guys who play 400 year old violins.
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#6
Quote by woodenbandman
80 is a good price, kiln dried or air dried. besides, wood does get better with age, just ask the guys who play 400 year old violins.


That's because it's been played for centuries, not because the wood has been laying around.
#7
If it's been kept maintained in a temperature/humidity controlled room for almost 20 years, then it's probaly a nicely seasoned piece of wood. Personally, i'd take it. As the wood ages, the boards often become stiffer. If you know how to tap test your wood (it's pretty much useless on solid body guitars really, but it's still possible to do.) then you'll know how different aged wood sounds when tapped. If only you could have tapped the board when he first let it season, and then tapped it now. I think you'd know the difference.

As far as things getting better with age, I think tone woods only improve if they've been played on, like, the vibrations change the wood. If it's just been chillin for twenty years it'll probably sound the same as a new piece.

That's completely false, and you don't seem too sure there. Why add to the confusion here? Although it is true that tonewoods age 'better' after being played on, having a stiff board to start an instrument from is a lot more important on how it ages.

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#8
Quote by mr_hankey
I definitely wouldn't pay more for it than new wood; this old piece has just been air dried, not kiln dried like newer pieces.

Why not? Air dried wood is almost superior to kiln dried woods. Not that kiln dried woods are BAD, but air drying is superior to it because it's a much slower process. Air drying usually eliminates any internal stresses inside the wood, which is bad for resonance, if it gets too hot in the kiln. Although, this is a variable and can often be controlled by a properly trained operator.

I'd pay more for age seasoned wood than kiln dried wood. Just because I like the 'feel', I guess you could say, or air dried woods.

Chris
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#10
Quote by ohspyro89
Ive wandered this question also.

My dad build a huge Maple table, thats about 2 1/4" thick, and has been around 35+ years. They wanted to get rid of it, but I kept it in my basement. I might as well cut er' up and make somethin outa it!

sure, go for it.


and about aged wood: vaughncraft drum factory is local, and they have this 400,000 year old wood from the bottom of a swamp, and it makes excellent snare shells. aged wood is good.
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