#1
I wasnt sure where to put this but here goes,

Im currently using Kristal to record some songs of mine but everytime i export a mixdown the file size is huge! the smallest being 16mb.
how would i go about reducing this to the average 1,2 or possibly 3mb size?
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#2
you need to render it to an mp3 or wma file instead of a wav file. and make sure its not super high bitrate either.
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#3
do i need a program to do that? im not really familiar with changing file types
Quote by CORT noob
Sex her, take the guitar, then sex her mom and have her walk in on you. Then, mom is happy, she doesn't want to be your friend anymore, and you keep the geetar. It's a win win for America!
#4
im not familiar with the program you are using but when you select render as or whatever there should be a drop down menu that lets you select what kind of file type you want to render it to. select mp3 if it does that or if not it will probably d wma or .ogg and set the bitrate to 192 kb/s

http://www.kreatives.org/kristal/manual/index.html go too "how to create a mixdown."
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Last edited by Kid_Thorazine at Jan 17, 2007,
#5
Quote by benEboy2008
do i need a program to do that? im not really familiar with changing file types

You shouldn't. I'm not familiar with "Kristal," but I dare say that if it's worth its weight, it has a feature within it somewhere that allows you to export your song as an mp3. If not, there are several programs on the net you can use. I personally prefer Nero's encoder (though I've only gotten that as part of a larger package). For general simple encoding, though, I'll go ahead and suggest dBpowerAMP. Check out the trial. It's good for 30 days and it gets the job done.

Also, be sure you're encoding reasonably. When recording straight to WAV, it captures everything in its original quality; obviously, that's gonna make the file size larger. The objective of .mp3 format is to mimic the WAV format without considerable loss to sound quality and yet dramatically increase compression. Using mp3 is the apparent better chocie of the two, but there are many options for encoding in mp3. I'm no master at it, but there are basics it'd be helpful to follow.

Mp3 encoding differs on bitrates. You can have one set bit-rate, which is what I usually use, or you can have a variable bit rate. With one set bit-rate, you can pretty much predict the filesize, and maintain a set quality. Some people prefer to use variable, though. The objective of variable bit-rates is to utilize the most appropriate bit-rate for a particular part of a song, (as opposed to the entire song, as does having one set bit-rate). This can both increase or decrease the filesize as if you were using one set rate, and it usually provides teh ebst quality. Doing this, however, usually takes longer to encode (nothing serious...a few seconds, maybe, depending on the range).

Assuming you stick to one set rate, though (which is what I recommend, if you're not too familiar with encoding) the lowest mp3 bit-rate I've ever seen is 32 kbps, but very rarely would you use that for anything. At bare minimum, most people stick to 64 kbps. The standard bit rate(s) are 128/160/192 kbps, and these are probably what you ought to stick with. These are the main choices for maintaining quality and minimizing file size. Obviously, the higher the bit-rate, the better the quality of sound, but such increases the file size. Until you familiarize yourself more with the options of encoding, stick with 128 kbps. At this rate, you can usually calculate that a second of sound equals roughly 150kbs, making a 3 minute song around 3 megabytes, or a little less, and the sound quality difference is barely noticable (if at all) unless you're using high-grade equipment.