#2
Bust your ass to be good enough to play any style you might be required to play, then start droppin ads in the paper, then start droppin ads in studios near you. Send out demos to labels with your contact into on em. There's no easy way, man. Also sessioning on a bunch of local bands' EPs is a great way to get your name out there. They'll have to credit you for your work.
#3
Quote by ohmerrymayhem
Bust your ass to be good enough to play any style you might be required to play, then start droppin ads in the paper, then start droppin ads in studios near you. Send out demos to labels with your contact into on em. There's no easy way, man. Also sessioning on a bunch of local bands' EPs is a great way to get your name out there. They'll have to credit you for your work.


+1

you need to be able to read sheet music too... atleast it helps incase the people who hire you only do sheet music.
#4
To be a session musician you have to know your instrument inside out, and basically be able to play any style that is called upon. You will need to tons of theory knowledge, as you will hear things like "hey, gimme the 7th instead of the 5th in bar four". you will need sheet reading skills.

Basically, you have to be really good.

Oh, and then you have to know people too.
#5
My current teacher is a session musician. He is one of the most versatile and knowledgeable musician I know and can in a moment switch styles, keys etc.

Studio time is money by the minute, and if you are hired they are not going to be patient with you if you spend too much time working out keys, bass lines, or stumbling through reading sheet music or chord charts.