#1
This is likley a stupid question but, I know that a lot of tuners have adjustable reference frquencies. However, what is the advantage of being able to adjust this? I would assume that if you changed the reference pitch your guitar would just be tuned differently when using the tuner? Would it not be simpler for tuners all to have a fixed frequency?
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Alex
Member of "The True British Eccentric Tea Drinking Appreciation Preservation Society"
#2
The standard is 440Hz, but I mean I do use it as there are some songs I play tuned to 432Hz and 444Hz. The advantage is that you set the frequency to the rest of the band or whatever (such as a piano in an orchestra or jazz band or whatever) by getting the piano to play a note and then adjusting the tuner until it reads in tune. Then you can tune your instrument from that.
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#3
I see, so the advantage being that you can change the pitch of tuning by very small increments? Hmm, i suppose that could be useful. Thanks.
Member of "The True British Eccentric Tea Drinking Appreciation Preservation Society"
#4
Yeah, it makes tuning to a band very easy. I used it a lot when I played with my school's jazz band.
Double Neck Project - Winner of 2006 GB&C "Best guitar build from scratch", "(Best) Most expensive build" and "Best Idea" awards - FINISHED!

Member #2 of the UG Luthier's club. PM AlGeeEater to join.
#5
When there's an instrument that you can't tune easily, like a piano or xylophone, you can use it so that everyone is in tune to said instrument.