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#1
Hello all,

Let me begin by admitting that I’m a complete noob. Sad to say, but true. I’m 42 and just recently developed an interest in guitar. Actually it’s my daughter’s fault that I’ve developed this affliction so we’ll just blame her. She’s 12 and entered the 6th grade this past fall. She has been asking for a guitar for the last couple of years but, knowing her, I figured she would just bang around on it a while until her fingers got sore and/or she got bored and then it would wind up just so much closet clutter (that happened to me when I was 10 or so). But in the 6th grade her school offered a strings program/class and she was interested. So, now I figured that if I bought her a guitar she would have to give it a try for at least the whole school year and hopefully that would be enough to get her over the hump. So she signed up and got her guitar. And that’s when it began. I started thinking...big mistake I know. But I started thinking that it would be something we could do together, a common bond or interest, or what ever. Anyway, I decided to get me one too. So, I bought a Taylor acoustic and started playing around with her class music book. That’s when it began. I found that I really enjoy it and I can’t seem to get enough.
I travel a good deal at times for work and spend many boring nights in hotels so I decided I need a small travel guitar so I could practice when traveling. So I got one. Then we started looking at electrics and I bought an ESP and VOX 30 watt modeling amp. Then I found out about the Traveler Speedster and thought that’s just the ticket for the hotel thing. Bought one of those too, and a Korg Pandora, headphones, etc. So now I’m all set for both home and away, acoustic and electric. Couldn’t be happier except for one thing…I can’t play! Well, I mean I can play around a bit and play a few simple single note songs like “The Star Spangled Banner” and a fairly decent little song that I wrote myself but I’m ready to start on a real learning regimen. My problem is, like I said earlier, I travel a lot at times, and between work, home and family commitments, I can’t see formal lessons working for me. I’m getting to the point, trust me.

I’ve seen an instruction program called “Learn and Master Guitar” and of course they claim it’s the best thing since Les Paul or Leo Fender but who knows. It looks and sounds like a quality instruction course but being a noob I don’t want to get taken. It’s not cheap but if it’s a decent course then it would be worth the price to me. The advantage that I see, provided the quality of content is there, is that I could use it when traveling and at my own pace and schedule. It would enable me to practice away those long nights in the hotel instead of melting my brain watching the tube and hopefully enable me to advance my skills at least to a decent degree. I mean, let’s face it; a 42 year old guitar noob doesn’t exactly have dreams of growing up to be a rock star. I just want to play for myself and enjoy a fun hobby.

So, my question is; has anyone used this course, or at least reviewed its content? Would it work for me or are there better options out there? One other thing that I like about it is that it is DVD, CD and book based rather than web based, which means I can pretty much use it anywhere and not be relying on a web connection. I know there are a lot of programs out there so is there a better one that fits my needs?

Any advice and/or comments are welcome. Thanks.
#2
I always thought the only people on UG were 14 year old guys who think they know everything about guitar....I guess Im wrong.
Gear
Epiphone Les Paul 100
Ibanez Jump Start
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Hartke 412 Cab
Boss Chromatic Tuner Pedal
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Ibanez Weaping Demon
#3
no idea about the course. if it looks good and has good reviews then my advice is get it. i get everything i can to try to increase my knowledge, but instead of a self teaching thing i got a real techer so i don't know how beneficial this program is
The Big Three

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#4
I've never tried those programs, so i can't really give you any opinions on them. There are a few good free online lesson sites, but unfortunately they're usually not super organized, so you have to end up searching through them to find what you want (they usually don't show you how to play songs as much as help you learn techniques). It's usually easier to choose a song that you like but that isn't out of your skill level, then if there are hard techniques or something then turn to the free websites. I find learning off the internet was better than out of a book, because school music books usually consist of songs you get bored with fast, making you get bored playing them and bored with guitar. Learning off the internet or from a knowledgeable friend or teacher can be better because you an learn songs you like. anyway, welcome to the wonderfull world of guitar and good luck finding what you need

edit: here's some pretty good lessons from right here:
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/home/contributions/search.php?PickNGrin
Last edited by james4 at Jan 19, 2007,
#5
I taught myselft. I guess those books kinda helped, they just weren't my thing. I wanted to do what I wanted to and that wasn't it.
#7
I've never heard of that Learn and Master thing, but, if you're looking for a good beginner DVD, see if you can find Peter Finlays Complete Rock Guitarist series 1, or his series 1 of Acousitc DVD. It has well explained videos, and tab booklets with rhythm/lead to the songs. Plus stuff on chords and scales. Cost me £15 for my DVD. i'm looking for the second series now.

Also, I see you travel a lot, so just whenever you have the time at the hotel, play guitar. Get your callouses strong in your fingers, work on chords, etc.
#8
Quote by Imaposer
Hello all,

Let me begin by admitting that I’m a complete noob. Sad to say, but true. I’m 42 and just recently developed an interest in guitar. Actually it’s my daughter’s fault that I’ve developed this affliction so we’ll just blame her. She’s 12 and entered the 6th grade this past fall. She has been asking for a guitar for the last couple of years but, knowing her, I figured she would just bang around on it a while until her fingers got sore and/or she got bored and then it would wind up just so much closet clutter (that happened to me when I was 10 or so). But in the 6th grade her school offered a strings program/class and she was interested. So, now I figured that if I bought her a guitar she would have to give it a try for at least the whole school year and hopefully that would be enough to get her over the hump. So she signed up and got her guitar. And that’s when it began. I started thinking...big mistake I know. But I started thinking that it would be something we could do together, a common bond or interest, or what ever. Anyway, I decided to get me one too. So, I bought a Taylor acoustic and started playing around with her class music book. That’s when it began. I found that I really enjoy it and I can’t seem to get enough.
I travel a good deal at times for work and spend many boring nights in hotels so I decided I need a small travel guitar so I could practice when traveling. So I got one. Then we started looking at electrics and I bought an ESP and VOX 30 watt modeling amp. Then I found out about the Traveler Speedster and thought that’s just the ticket for the hotel thing. Bought one of those too, and a Korg Pandora, headphones, etc. So now I’m all set for both home and away, acoustic and electric. Couldn’t be happier except for one thing…I can’t play! Well, I mean I can play around a bit and play a few simple single note songs like “The Star Spangled Banner” and a fairly decent little song that I wrote myself but I’m ready to start on a real learning regimen. My problem is, like I said earlier, I travel a lot at times, and between work, home and family commitments, I can’t see formal lessons working for me. I’m getting to the point, trust me.

I’ve seen an instruction program called “Learn and Master Guitar” and of course they claim it’s the best thing since Les Paul or Leo Fender but who knows. It looks and sounds like a quality instruction course but being a noob I don’t want to get taken. It’s not cheap but if it’s a decent course then it would be worth the price to me. The advantage that I see, provided the quality of content is there, is that I could use it when traveling and at my own pace and schedule. It would enable me to practice away those long nights in the hotel instead of melting my brain watching the tube and hopefully enable me to advance my skills at least to a decent degree. I mean, let’s face it; a 42 year old guitar noob doesn’t exactly have dreams of growing up to be a rock star. I just want to play for myself and enjoy a fun hobby.

So, my question is; has anyone used this course, or at least reviewed its content? Would it work for me or are there better options out there? One other thing that I like about it is that it is DVD, CD and book based rather than web based, which means I can pretty much use it anywhere and not be relying on a web connection. I know there are a lot of programs out there so is there a better one that fits my needs?

Any advice and/or comments are welcome. Thanks.


First of all, welcome aboard sir!
There are plenty of quality books on the basics of guitar that are available in the market. Lots of them. Not just books, but also instructionals. Sometimes it seems like every major guitarist has his own instructional video(s). It's all in the mind. It's not very hard, trust me
"Physics is like sex. Sure, it may give some practical results, but that's not why we do it." - Richard Feynman
#9
YAY! PROPER GRAMMAR!

Alright, now that I'm done with that...I used books when I first started playing, I'm not sure what books they were though, but they got me off to a very good start. My advice here is don't rely on the books to teach you everything, some things you have to learn on your own.

Welcome to UG, and good luck with learning guitar .
Yellowknife, Northwest Territories
#10
I recommed this site, they pretty much have it all + a forum if there is anything you'd like to ask. I also highly recommend taking lessons at least a couple of times a year just to make sure your not getting used to do something horribly wrong (probably the worst thing that can happen).
Hope it helps and good luck!
GEAR:
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T3H HAMMER
#11
And just so you don't feel like you're the only one:

I'm 48 and have only been playing for little more than a year. Right after I started, my 15 year old daughter started playing (after stubbornly denying that she wanted to learn!) Upside: father/daughter bonding while she struggles thru her teens. And she now appreciates the greatness that is Pink Floyd. Downside: she wants more, expensive guitars!
#13
Get Guitar for Dummies, you won't regret it.

+1 I never used it, but I've flicked through it and there's a lot of good stuff in it.
Actually called Mark!

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#14
I'm 46 and starting over. I tinkered around as a teen, wished I would have stayed with it. This is what I did. I got a decent electric (gax-70).

I spent the first month just working with scales, this helped me with dexterity and learning note on the guitar. I take a lesson every 2 weeks. I think that you should be able to squeeze in a half hour lesson every twice a month. After a few lessons there will be plenty to work on. You will learn what you need to work on after a bit.

I still have a hard time with barre chords, but have only been playing 3 months. I can play Back in Black and Knocking on Heavens Door fairly well. Still having "trying" moment with barre chord songs.

I chose an electric because it is more confortable to play, sour notes and lousy playing dont stand out as much. I take my guitar to my kids dance classes and practice there without disturbing many folk.
Rememer play to have fun, there is no test to see what you can do in X period of time and no speed contests.

My friends that play just tell me to just stay with it and it will come. I have planned on a year to play decently. My teacher said it takes about a year or 2 to become proficient.

Go at your own pace. The earlier post is correct, not everyone is 14 or knows it all. Us "old" guys have a lot more common sense.

Take your time and have fun!
#15
I've never heard of "Learn and Master Guitar" before but i can suggest some books. Definitely check out the Hal Leonard series called "Guitar Method" it's a 3 book series that you can buy as a bundle which includes 3 CDs for you to play along with. It teaches you basic chord shapes, all the notes in each position, and basic theory. My high school's guitar class teaches exclusively out of these books.
Also check out MJS's Total Scales Techniques and Applications this is the book that really helped me understand the fretboard. I hear MI's Fretboard Workbook is very good as well.
#16
the thought of a 42 year old dude saying "noob" just makes me giggle
... For A Pair Of Brown Eyes

Quote by Bladez22
smoke, you get more awesome by the minute..... You have an epic beard, live near woods, listen to metal, grill stuff using makeshift bbqs out of old cans, and now we find out you have stabbed someone in the dick
#17
Quote by FoskcoKills
I've never heard of "Learn and Master Guitar" before but i can suggest some books. Definitely check out the Hal Leonard series called "Guitar Method" it's a 3 book series that you can buy as a bundle which includes 3 CDs for you to play along with. It teaches you basic chord shapes, all the notes in each position, and basic theory. My high school's guitar class teaches exclusively out of these books.
Also check out MJS's Total Scales Techniques and Applications this is the book that really helped me understand the fretboard. I hear MI's Fretboard Workbook is very good as well.

I agree with the Hal Leonard recommendation. The Alfred series is also respected.

What's "good" isn't an objective thing, unfortunately. Not only does it depend on the quality of the medium itself, but it also depends on your natural learning predilections. Some people are better at reading something and figuring it out on their own, whereas other people need examples to learn. It's like teachers in school - one teacher who's great for some students may be terrible for others because people learn differently. Also, since your starting around middle age, you'll need repetition to train your motor nerve responses more than your daughter since your neural pathways have long been formed. You may have to start out a little slower (plan on feeling a little retarded). You'll take a lot of wrong turns and untrodden paths during your learning process, but know that that's the fun of learning this damned instrument. Good luck with everything.
Hi, I'm Peter
#18
I am another middle-aged new guitar player. I started last October, and at 42, it is good to see other guys around my age here. Guitar is a challenge to be sure but it is also very rewarding and I am enjoying it very much.

Chris
#19
Get a guitar teachter to teach you the basics. It's very important that you don't start teaching yourself inproper techniques! After that is comes down to a lot of practise and ofcourse hanging out on the UG forum will also help since this comunity is ofcourse filled with guitar players of all sorts of diffrent styles and levels that'll help you when you have questions
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#20
i think the best help i could give you would be to make some friends who already know how to play. Books and online lessons are great, but if theres someone who knows what they are talking about in front of you, you can learn much quicker.. that and all the stuff above and you should be good to go.

On another note, i try to help around and teach some of my friends the basics to guitar playing. I help out some UG'ers through MSN Messenger, if you like, i could help you out with whatever questions you might have. Yes, im that nice of a guy.

You can add me on MSN at: blues_ball@hotmail.com

about how qualified a person i am to teach, not to brag or anything like that, but i almost became a guitar teacher at Yamaha Music School. I turned it down because i wanted to continue with my studies and had no time for teaching.

So yea, if you need any help, i'd gladly help ya..

peace..
"I don't mind making sissy rock. I'll rock your ass sensitive style" - John Mayer
#21
Yeah man, welcome. I am 34 not really a newb but somedays play like one...

But this site totally rocks. It is rare that anyone would flame you on this site. So far I am flame free. So no question is a stupid question. We were all Noobs at one point or another.
#22
I'm 44 and just started about a year ago...and love playing, I wish I started years ago. I purchased the Jamorama course which is great for learning chords, strumming patterns and some picking technique. What I like best are the videos, and jam sessions you can play along with. I also got the AmazingGuitarSecrets course which is more theory and just got the Blues Guitar Secrets course from the same author. Together I feel like both courses really helped my understanding and playing, although I do want to take a few lessons to reach the next level of playing. Good luck!
#23
Hi all, and to Imaposer ...

I personally think that there are so many valid ways to learn the guitar.

Some guitarists are self-taught, they don't do books, all they need is to pick up the basics, and they're off - increasing their skills by ear. My friend was like that - he could play complex tunes by Acoustic Alchemy simply by listening to their music.

I'm probably like most hobby guitarists - look for free online lessons, buy a few books, learn whatever is need to be learned, and if we're fortunate enough, we could increase our playing abilities by leaps and bounds by learning from a skillful buddy. There have been some excellent recommendations in this thread, I have not heard of many of the books and courses and will have to research them in the days to come.

Coming back to your question on Steve Krenz's Learn and Master Guitar course. This differs from other material recommended in this thread in that it is sold only through the internet, pretty much like Jamorama, and seems to command a higher-than-average price.

I have no experience with it, but happened to chance upon a thread at Harmony Central discussing this exact course - have you seen it? --> http://acapella.harmony-central.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1348444

There is some pretty good feedback there on the course, but you'll need to get past a string of inflammatory posts to get to the valuable ones.

The general consensus seems to be that L&MG is geared towards the beginner, and is especially strong in its presentation structure, making it easy for the learner to progress from one level to another.

(I hope the forum rules allow the following ....)
During the course of my promotion of L&MG (from which I earn a commission), I have received emails from customers stating that they found the L&MG course suitable for them and worth the price - I wish to emphasize the "for them" factor - they're also just starting out with the guitar, some are coming back to it after years of not playing it, and for some reason or other, could not attend regular lessons.

I strongly believe that all guitar training material out there are of good quality, especially those that have been recommended in one form or other. The only difficulty lies in finding one that's suitable *** for you ***. In this respect, ensuring that that the material has an iron-clad money-back guarantee, or carefully deciding how much money to allocate to purchasing training material, should hopefully minimize major disappointments.

I wish you all the best in your decision.
#24
Quote by Raytonium
And just so you don't feel like you're the only one:

I'm 48 and have only been playing for little more than a year. Right after I started, my 15 year old daughter started playing (after stubbornly denying that she wanted to learn!) Upside: father/daughter bonding while she struggles thru her teens. And she now appreciates the greatness that is Pink Floyd. Downside: she wants more, expensive guitars!


Dont worry, pretty soon youll want more expensive guitars also. It happens to all of us.
Duct tape. I need it for... taping something.
#25
For anyone trying to learn the basics -- http://nextlevelguitar.com/ is the best. Just watch some of their easy video lessons (Like Good Riddance, Horse with no name, etc) and you start playing really easy... plus theres lessons on just about everything on the site. To get to the good stuff, you do have to pay a membership fee... but I'll tell you i couldnt have been happier.
#26
UG itself has great lessons. I started out with this site when I first started learning guitar and it never let me down.

Remember... It's never too late to play, it just takes practice to get to the goal you want to accomplish.

Good Luck, have fun and never give up. :P
Most of the important things


in the world have been accomplished


by people who have kept on


trying when there seemed to be no hope at all
#27
Hi. I'm 51, been playing about 18 months(inspired by my 21 year old son and his friends). I had about 8 lessons in a bginners course and that helped me a lot, so any lessons you can get would be good. I've never heard of that course but there are heaps of free lessons available on line. Download guitar pro and find tabs for some music that you like and try them, don't be afraid to try anything. Look at any guitar site for lessons and tips, it helps. Also play with any friends or relatives at every opportunity. I love it, hope you do too. Have a blast 'old' friend.
#29
Thanks to all that have responded so far and for the suggestions made. I’ll definitely be checking some of those options out soon. I’ve been all over the net copying and pasting a ton of info into word from various places. The problem that I have with this material is that it’s not organized very well for me. It’s just a library of disorganized tips and techniques, some of which makes sense and some that doesn’t. That’s why I was interested in the L&MG course. It at least appears to be an organized course that would take me through the steps of building a foundation for my future learning. I was hoping that once I completed the course I would have a better understanding of all the other material available. One other thing that I thought I might benefit from is the visuals of the DVDs. Reading something is one thing but actually being able to see it demonstrated is something else entirely.


Quote by dlcmh
Hi all, and to Imaposer ...

I personally think that there are so many valid ways to learn the guitar.

Some guitarists are self-taught, they don't do books, all they need is to pick up the basics, and they're off - increasing their skills by ear. My friend was like that - he could play complex tunes by Acoustic Alchemy simply by listening to their music.

I'm probably like most hobby guitarists - look for free online lessons, buy a few books, learn whatever is need to be learned, and if we're fortunate enough, we could increase our playing abilities by leaps and bounds by learning from a skillful buddy. There have been some excellent recommendations in this thread, I have not heard of many of the books and courses and will have to research them in the days to come.

Coming back to your question on Steve Krenz's Learn and Master Guitar course. This differs from other material recommended in this thread in that it is sold only through the internet, pretty much like Jamorama, and seems to command a higher-than-average price.

I have no experience with it, but happened to chance upon a thread at Harmony Central discussing this exact course - have you seen it? --> http://acapella.harmony-central.com/forums/showthread.php?t=1348444

There is some pretty good feedback there on the course, but you'll need to get past a string of inflammatory posts to get to the valuable ones.

The general consensus seems to be that L&MG is geared towards the beginner, and is especially strong in its presentation structure, making it easy for the learner to progress from one level to another.

(I hope the forum rules allow the following ....)
During the course of my promotion of L&MG (from which I earn a commission), I have received emails from customers stating that they found the L&MG course suitable for them and worth the price - I wish to emphasize the "for them" factor - they're also just starting out with the guitar, some are coming back to it after years of not playing it, and for some reason or other, could not attend regular lessons.

I strongly believe that all guitar training material out there are of good quality, especially those that have been recommended in one form or other. The only difficulty lies in finding one that's suitable *** for you ***. In this respect, ensuring that that the material has an iron-clad money-back guarantee, or carefully deciding how much money to allocate to purchasing training material, should hopefully minimize major disappointments.

I wish you all the best in your decision.



Thanks for the link (lots of alternative suggestions there) and your input. There were a few positive posts from people claiming to have had personal experience, which is what I’m looking for. The negative responses however where from people with no actual experience with the course at all. The only problem is that most of the positive replies, save one, were from new members whose entire post count could be counted on that one thread. Not to say that they weren’t valid, and actually most did sound truthful but you never know. That’s precisely why I posted my question here: I saw a few on-line reviews and when I followed the links to the L&MG site I saw their affiliate program that pays. I believe it was $70 to, sites that link to them for a sale. Kinda makes me wonder about the credibility of the so called “reviews”. There are a lot of opinions about the best method of learning guitar and I’m sure they are all, for the most part, valid. But, I’m also sure that people are different and have different needs so what one person thinks is the only way may not work as well for someone else. The jury is still out for me on this and I’m waiting for a few more people to respond from actual experience before I drop the dough. But if I do decide to spring for it, I’ll most likely go through your site since you are the only one I’ve seen offering any kind of deal.


Quote by BottleOfSmoke
the thought of a 42 year old dude saying "noob" just makes me giggle


Yeah, well I giggle when I think of how every generation believes that they invented the world . Not meaning this directly towards you necessarily, but I see it all the time in my daughter too. Maybe you’re older than I think but I was probably using the word “newbie” before most people here were talking and definitely before the internet and forums like this one were even created. When I was in college, way back in the mid-80s , I was fortunate enough to live in an apartment directly across the street from a private catholic high school. Yep, the real deal, plaid skirts, white button down shirts, white socks, black shoes, the whole little visual fantasy. Ahh, memories . Anyway, my roommate and I used the term “newbies” to refer to the nice pert “new” frontal protuberances (otherwise known as tits) of all the little cuties. Much later, with the advent of internet forums “newbie” became slang for someone new to a forum or pretty much anything for that matter. Now I’m not going to be so presumptuous as to say that we, or my generation, coined the term but we were using it in my youth. And write this down in your diary, On Feb. 2, 2007 some old geezer called Imaposer told you that one day, you’ll be an old geezer too, and when you look back on it all you’ll realize that it wasn’t really all that long ago and that he wasn’t as old as you originally thought. Actually if you saw me you probably wouldn’t realize that I’m 42 anyway. Not to dis’ the guys that do, but I don’t fit the image of the fat bald guy at all. I stay in shape, still have 97% of my hair, and have a very youthful outlook on life being open minded and willing to try new things. I drive a Jeep (a real Jeep), ride sport bikes and dirtbikes and do lots of things that old geezers generally don’t. In fact, even my daughter will admit, grudgingly, that I’m pretty dang cool for a dad, even going so far as to ask for my opinions on clothing styles and fashion. Again, this isn’t meant to be inflammatory just a comment to all the young guys that may read this. Peace Bro’.
#30
first of all, it's always good to hear from anyone on here with reasonable grammar and a chill attitude. i started playing when i was 24, and it's only been a few years for me now. i'm a little backwards from most players because i spend more time with scales, exercises, and improvising, while i rarely have the discipline or interest to learn entire tabs of songs. i tend to learn short riffs or phrases.. the good parts.

i have learned a few solos, and i find those to be a huge eye-opener about rhythm. it's a great idea to take video of yourself playing if possible. i took some quicktime videos of myself playing the first "fade to black" solo back when i just began to get it down. i never realized how much i have improved until i watched those old takes.. i mean the rhythm is embarrassingly wrong, but i did not hear it then. things like recording yourself and playing to a metronome will force you to see not only what you're doing wrong, but also how much you are progressing ..and that part feels great.

that being said, i've come to find that rhythm is the most fundamental thing about playing guitar. you can play all the right notes, but still not sound right if you don't have good rhythm. you can use a metronome to bring the song down to a learnable speed, but keep the correct rhythm. a lot of time if you try to just play something slower, you are way off rhythm, and then when you speed it up, it's sloppy. i've only recently begun to practice with one, despite reading about its importance again and again. i feel like i have wasted a lot of time without one. unlike a friend that might be reluctant to say "hey, you can play that better.. try again," the metronome is quite unforgiving, so if your timing is off you will know immediately. at the same time, it's kind of soothing to have those clicks going. i have to say that my scale runs are way tighter now, as i used to always mess them up a bit coming back down. the metronome is helping me fix a lot of bad habits that developed. at the very least, pick one up to help you get through the real trouble spots.

lastly, as to your question about the lessons, i can't answer that because i don't know. if you have a laptop to travel with, you might download some free video clips at home (like the PickNGrin columns mentioned earlier here) and bring them along so that you can have some visuals to help you learn. as for books, i found this one to be quite useful. it covers all kinds of playing techniques, plus it also has a good introduction to music theory for guitar. bottom line, get used to playing along to a click or some kind of backing tracks to keep you in time. good luck!
Originally posted by Geetarbumb
I think your screwed ! You should quit guitar and take up the skin flute!
#32
Quote by kurosawa
uz teh oLdz Lawl



Quote by lowtek
first of all, it's always good to hear from anyone on here with reasonable grammar…!
#33
I just turned 50! (doh!)

I've been playing for about 30 years. The best advice I can give you about material
for learning guitar is this: goto http://www.guitarprinciples.com/ and BUY "The
Principles of Correct Practice for Guitar". Buy all their stuff if you can. If you could buy
only 1 book, that would be THE book to get.
#34
Quote by edg
I just turned 50! (doh!)

I've been playing for about 30 years. The best advice I can give you about material
for learning guitar is this: goto http://www.guitarprinciples.com/ and BUY "The
Principles of Correct Practice for Guitar". Buy all their stuff if you can. If you could buy
only 1 book, that would be THE book to get.



finally i was just gonna recommend this

guess that's a +1


i'm a student, with parents who don't like spending money unecessarily. Otherwise i'd buy those in an instant. Their free lessons online are AMAZING as well. They've improved my technique tenfold
Member of the "Marty Friedman > You" Club. PM apocalypse13 or altronataku to join

Gear:

ESP LTD DV8-R
Squier SG (Specs Unknown)
Kustom KGA-10 Ten watt practice amp
Marshall TSL 602

My JEM Build
#35
I got the course 3 months ago And i love it!! (wait 4 it to go on sale, it drops to 199 every so often) the videos are of Excellent quality and the "jam along" CD's are pure gold!! I'm a "noob" myself (35 yr. old) and like you i had guitars when i was young but just lost interest when i realized i knew nothing!! but with this course you can progress at your own speed and you always have the dvd's to go back to. also the book itself is super helpful!! the l&mg website has a disscussion forumn that is also REALLY helpful, with steve krenz himself answering to all the posts as well as some of the other more experienced members. all in all i beleive i have made an excellent purchase, and if someone stole it or i lost it, I would definatly re-buy the whole course...... hope this helps
#36
Quote by Liarsenic12
I always thought the only people on UG were 14 year old guys who think they know everything about guitar....I guess Im wrong.



unfortunately your right, except for a select few back on topic, not sure about the course, if its rather expensive i wouldnt bother. just do some research on the web and learn basic chords. if the program isnt expensive, give it a shot, but personally ive learned all my info from the web and found those instructionals not very helpful.
#37
Welcome

I read about this book on another thread and just ordered it from Amayon, cannot tell you yet if it is good, but it was reccomended...

The Complete Idiot's Guide to Music Theory, 2nd Edition
#38
Self Taught FTW!
Try to Learn some scales, chords, and riffs, and move on from there. There are tons of sites to help you with those things I noted above.
R.I.P Dimebag
#39
Being self-taught, I got all my knowledge from UG. Everything from the mere basics, like reading tabs, to the complex stuff, like theory.
You simply MUST check out my music on
Reverbnation Downloads available here
Myspace Streaming Only


Especially for fans of Tool, APC, Avant-Garde, Ambient music, rock instrumentals, and fans of music in general. Will not disappoint.
#40
Quote by seek_&_destroy

i'm a student, with parents who don't like spending money unecessarily. Otherwise i'd buy those in an instant. Their free lessons online are AMAZING as well. They've improved my technique tenfold


There's really nothing else like it out there and it presents you with the REAL DEAL
on exactly what it takes to become a good guitarist, which essentially all comes down
to how you practice.

If you take that stuff seriously, you WILL make a lot of progress Without it, your
progress will be haphazard unless you're lucky (or naturally talented for practicing).

I wish I had followed something like this 30 years ago when I started. I got the
stuff a couple years ago and it really helped correct the defects in my playing and
I make more progress in a week than I used to in many months. It's never too late
to start on better ways to get better... This book should be issued to ALL beginners
BY LAW!
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