#1
I've run into a bit of a problem. I guess you could say I am somewhat of a "classically trained" musician, as I had 7 years of piano lessons before picking up a guitar. I've been playing (guitar) for about a year and a half now, and while I'm a decent player, I'm still having some trouble getting my head around some of the theoretical aspects of playing.

Mostly, it has to do with my ability to read music for guitar written in standard notation. I have no problems with identifying notes on the fretboard, or remebering chords or scale patterns or whatever, but if a peice of music written in standard notation is placed before me, im completely lost. I guess my biggest problem is that I cant seem to fully grasp relativity of the intervals on the guitar (that a note on one string is five frets below on the next and whatnot). I feel like my guitar playing is going to be incumbered until i sort this out, so what is the best way of approaching it.
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#2
standard notation? lol, most people just use tablature. is there any real advantage to using sheet music instead of tabs?
#3
there is...alot like tempo and pitch and unlike a guitar/bass tab you can play from every instrument via a notation.
#4
^yes youll get rhythmic reading or w/e easier, tab just shows frets, it helps with music in general, otherwise your stuck with guitar

honestly, its really hard to sight read guitar, im majoring in it in college, and its hard as hell, but you just have to work with it, theres no easy way to do it, just practive thats all - when i say sight reading im making a generalized statement of reading notation
#5
then throw all you know about piano out the window.
i have never trained on a piano and i have no probs on my guitar
you should really study fretboard logic and how its working
and get used to it
#6
Quote by soulgazer
then throw all you know about piano out the window.
i have never trained on a piano and i have no probs on my guitar
you should really study fretboard logic and how its working
and get used to it


Fretboard logic?
Quote by Macank
^^ strat? i want to get a stratocaster sound though!!


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Ibanez GAX 30
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#7
Whell.. this is what you do, start playing regular notes, and start identifiying major notes, liek G, C, D, F, etc.. Start on your E string and move up to your high E, not going above your 5th fret, and as you get comfortable with it, start moving up untill you get to the 12th fret, and just learn that the 12th fret and up mirrors the open note and up
#8
Get the Berklee Modern Method For Guitar Vol. 1, by William Leviette(sp?).

This book WILL help you to read IF you actually practice out of it.

You'll recognize this book by being black, and having a big green 1 on it.

Buy it!!!
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#9
Fretboard Logic = a book series that has been around for 20 some years and has a lot of good reviews. I'd recommend it (vols 1 & 2, skip vol 3, seems to be general consencus)
#10
Reading for guitar and piano is a bit different... when you learned piano you were probably taught the intervallic method, where you read by relative interval. That doesn't work so well on guitar, where you have to read in the opposite direction.

The two things you need to learn are to read from the top down when reading for guitar, you want to place the highest note first. The second is to read from the high e-string, and read in absolute pitch, instead of relative. What I mean by that is that you want to place the notes as low on the neck as possible, and keep the pitch right, while adjusting for playability and as few position shifts as possible... a few comprimises in there that you don't get when reading piano music.

Instead of reading relative to the last note, assume that the highest note in a particular frame (chord, or melodic sequence, depending) is placed on the high e string, or otherwise in the lowest position possible, and then place the other notes following on the other strings. After a while placing things 'inside' the neck gets a lot easier, it just takes time to get use to it.
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#11
also another thing to remember, music for guitar is written an octave higher than it is played traditionally. and for implementing theory i recommend the guitar grimoire series over fretboard logic, though that may just be personal preference.
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#12
This problem can be overcome by practising a lot but the thing is that some people just have more trouble with playing directly from sheet music than others. It has to do with the way your brain functions, my guitar teacher once explained it to me. Some people are good at working with notes while other people are much better at remembering the frets they need to fret and wich shapes to make with their hands. I don't know the exact details anymore but it has to do with diffrent skills in your brain that you might be good or bad at, like abstract thinking and spatial insight (probably not the right word, babelfished it)

I am one of the people who finds it very tricky to play directly from sheet music or even tab. Most of the time I can't play a song at decent speed untill I've memorized it. I'm quick when it comes to memorizing btw, but I just don't remember it as notes but more like shapes and movements and abstract figures and stuff.
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#13
Quote by Dardarian
I am one of the people who finds it very tricky to play directly from sheet music or even tab.


I think most guitarists are like this. The exception being genres and situations where you really need the ability to read: classical, some jazz, session musicians, etc.

But for rock, blues, country, most other forms of popular music, its usually played by ear.

I mean, when was the last time you saw somebody rocking out up on stage while reading music?
#14
Quote by Corwinoid
*Snip*

Just like to point out that I sight read like a bitch on guitar and I read relatively. It's possible to do both although I'm sure it's easier to do it absolutely once you get used to it.
The best way, in my opinion, to master the fretboard and reading music is to read more of it. When I came from my piano experience (granted I had been playing piano for about six years and I was ten years old) I couldn't read guitar sheet music to save my life. But I read a LOT of it -- excessively, often sight reading entire books from beginning to end -- and now I can do it as well, if not better than, I can on piano.