#2
Float freely? Meaning what? As far as I know, only Floyd-Rose type trems are "free floating". You'd have to buy a new trem and re-rout the body. Costy.
#3
what type of strat?

keeping the bridge loose can make it a REAL pain keeping it in tune.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

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#4
Quote by jj1565
what type of strat?

keeping the bridge loose can make it a REAL pain keeping it in tune.


Actually, the way it's designed, it's by keeping the bridge floating that keeps it in tune.
#5
^^Not in my experience. When you have the vintage style bridges floating they go out of tune all over the place. I guess if you had locking tuners and a roller nut then you might be a little better off, but I'm not rich enough to have tried it yet.
Feel free to ignore my ranting.

Member of the Self-Taught Club.

A recent study shows that 8% of teenagers listen to nothing but music with guitars in it. Put this in your sig if you're one of the 92% who isn't a close-minded moron.
#6
VIDEO Carl Verheyen's Strat set-up:

http://www.gitaarnet.nl/video/carlverheyen/carlverheyen-setup-hoog.ram


EVH sums handling the trem like this:

"You have to know the bar and what it does to your tuning when you use it. If you go down in pitch with it (not quite a divebomb), you should take note of which strings are affected and compensate with some light yanking after the trem has settled back to it's position of balance."


The secret is a to keep the whole path of the strings, from the last winding on the tuning peg, to the bullet at the end of the string friction-free. This means a quality, clean-cut nut cut exactly for the gauge of strings you are using and well lubed nut (teflon) and bridge (oil) at all the points where the strings make contact.


Finally, if you still can't feel how pitch is affected and yank-compensate:

The Tremsetter is a tremolo stabilizer, which replaces the middle trem spring and installs easily. The Tremsetter operates like an adjustable shock absorber, which when properly adjusted, keeps the guitar in tune. The costs is ~$50 and are available from Hipshot Products (hipshotproducts.com). This provides the best of both a trem and fixed bridge guitar. The guitar bridge with the Tremsetter operates more like a fixed bridge and enhances both tone and sustain as well as the tuning stability of the guitar. I have installed them on all my trem guitars and they work great. The Tremsetter provides the best of both a trem and fixed bridge guitar. The guitar bridge with the Tremsetter operates more like a fixed bridge and enhances both tone and sustain as well as the tuning stability of the guitar. Also, with a Tremsetter, you adjust the bridge to float a little off the guitar body to allow both up tremming and down tremming (not over tightening trem springs to pull the bridge flush to the body which only allows down tremming)I have installed them on all my trem guitars and they work great. This is not meant to be an ad pitch as I have no link with Hipshot Projects and just like this product because it works.

The Leo Fender tremolo patent drawing Carl Verheyen mentions in the clip:

Last edited by ColdGin at Jan 21, 2007,
#7
^like i said, it's a real pain keeping it in tune when free flowing like that.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011
#8
Quote by jj1565
^like i said, it's a real pain keeping it in tune when free flowing like that.

*When* properly set up, it is the in-body springs that keep the guitar in tune.
Set up the tremolo so the tail lays flat on the body instead of letting it float, that is render the springs useless in the trem's resting position, and you lose all capability to compensate for the extra tension being pulled through the bridge by the lower strings (E A D) on the higher strings (G B e) when you push the bar to lower pitch.

Below is a table of string tensions for an industry standard .010 gauge set

String - Gauge - Tension in lbs

1 e - .010 - 16.2
2 B - .013 - 15.4
3 G - .017 - 16.6
4 D - .026 - 18.4
5 A - .036 - 19.5
6 E - .046 - 17.5

What this means is both sides of the trem won't dip at the same time. In fact, when the trem bar is pushed, the side of the trem with the lower strings will rise off the body before the side with the higher strings, which causes a twisting effect along the axis of the neck, and an uncontrollable, variable tension on the higher strings when the trem is returned to it's original position, makng these to go out of tune.

Additionally you will have to lower the saddle of each string to reduce the angle of the saddle edge and the string, to lower the action and avoid breaking strings), before readjusting the intonation of all strings.
Last edited by ColdGin at Jan 22, 2007,
#9
Coldgin, that was a bizarrely repetitive and robotic sounding post there...
Feel free to ignore my ranting.

Member of the Self-Taught Club.

A recent study shows that 8% of teenagers listen to nothing but music with guitars in it. Put this in your sig if you're one of the 92% who isn't a close-minded moron.
#10
Actually, this is something that I've always through about. I've done this with some success, but I've still had minor tuning issues, mostly due to the strings sticking in the nut (I can wang on the bar a bit, but I would always have to tug the G back into tune and give it a squeeze behind the nut to make it come back). Thanks ColdGin for linking to that video...carl is an increadible player, I just never knew he had the technical knowledge behind it to know how to make these guitars perform the way he knows how to make them perform.

Any more useful tips ColdGin?
#11
Quote by TwoString

Any more useful tips ColdGin?


I like shortening the trem bar by a 1/4 or a 1/3 of it's handle length.

2 advantages:

- there are less chances you'll brush the strings with your fingers when your hand is on the move to pick up the trem handle

- you have to exercise more pressure on the bar for it to yank the same which increases the feeling of the trem bar in the hand .

Eric Johnson took off the string posts on the headstock to reduce even more string friction.
Last edited by ColdGin at Jan 22, 2007,
#12
I keep my trem straight with the body. Yesterday I tried the floating thing by loosening the screws a bit and it went all out of tune everytime I touched the trem.
#13
Quote by Chips-
I keep my trem straight with the body. Yesterday I tried the floating thing by loosening the screws a bit and it went all out of tune everytime I touched the trem.


You have to work with it. You can't just move the claw out and let it be, you actually have to put some effort into getting it to work. I've had some success, but I'm going to try again soon with some of the tips I've learned from the veheyren video and on the web.
#14
Quote by TwoString
You have to work with it. You can't just move the claw out and let it be, you actually have to put some effort into getting it to work. I've had some success, but I'm going to try again soon with some of the tips I've learned from the veheyren video and on the web.


No I meant the 6 screws that hold the bridge plate down. When I got the guitar (cheap Eko strat copy, used) they were tightened all the way down and I assumed that's the way they're supposed to be. I just found out that I was wrong. I always thought the trem was a bit tight compared to the Fenders that I've tried in the shop. But keeping them tight keeps the guitar in tune better.
#15
Quote by Chips-
No I meant the 6 screws that hold the bridge plate down. When I got the guitar (cheap Eko strat copy, used) they were tightened all the way down and I assumed that's the way they're supposed to be. I just found out that I was wrong. I always thought the trem was a bit tight compared to the Fenders that I've tried in the shop. But keeping them tight keeps the guitar in tune better.


Actually, the word in the backshop is:

- taking out the 4 inner screws, leaving the 2 outer, positionned under the low E and the high E string, noticeably improves the stability of the tremolo by reducing the number of contact points of the whole assembly. Three luthiers i've known for over 20 years concur, and particularly recommend this for the real 50s, 60s era strats.

- those screws are not supposed to be tight, but just loose enough to allow the bridge-trem block to act as a fulcrum and pivot on those screws, in theory to allow a shift of pitch of 3 full tones down, and 1 tone and 1/2 up.

Trivia: Being a hot rod mechanic, Jeff Beck does his own guitar setups.
Last edited by ColdGin at Jan 22, 2007,
#16
^ Well I'll mess around with it when I get a Fender strat. I'm thinking about changing the trem to a Callaham Vintage S model, it should be much better.
#18
Mine has a free floating bridge, stays in tune well and you can use the whammy bar in both directions. The key is to get the tension of the springs and the strings balanced, Id take it to a shop.
My Gear :
Fender American Strat in Metallic Red
EHX Big Muff
Boss ME-50
Boss SD-1
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Red Furry guitar strap

John Frusciante - The Greatest Guitarist EVER
#19
Quote by TwoString
ColdGin...I'm always looking for hot rod material for strats. Do you have any links for some good reading on the subject?


Stewart McDonald should carry all you can ever dream of...

Sam Ash has a few things...
Last edited by ColdGin at Jan 22, 2007,