#1
Although this will be down to what suits me best, I would like a few opinions on which of these these you would prefer to record on.

I have Cubase SE and I never felt like I got the most out of it. There is something about recording onto computer software that I really never got on with. I want to buy a Boss BR900CD but I don't know if it's worth it as they're not exactly cheap. Although I prefer the idea of recording songs on a machine in front of me other than using a computer, if you get me. Plus I already have my mind set on it, although I'm slightly unsure.

Does anyone own a multi track or Cubase? Which do you prefer? In terms of quality of sound and ease of use. I'd really like some help on this so any feeback is appriciated
#2
I have both and perfer computer. It is just much easier to normalize and noise gate tracks and edit them on a computer than on a ghetto little 8 track. By the way I use cubase and have a fostex MR-8.
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#3
I HATE Cubase. That Foxtex Mr-8 is a joke also. I would go with Logic, DP, Pro Tools, etc. and get a damn good audio interface. You'll be taken care of then.
I was once heavily prominent on these forums from 2004-2007, let's see how long I can stay now that I'm back.
#4
I prefer software over hardware - especially in this case. Software recording beats the living hell out of hardware recording machines. There's a reason why professional recording studios use software. You can see your wave forms. Unlimited audio tracks. Unlimited MIDI tracks. Seamless Audio and MIDI integration. Destructionless audio effects -can be added on endlessly. Mixing down. Uploading to the web. I could write pages on the advantages.

Most of all...flexibility. If you buy a hardware machine, it will never be any more than what it is when you bring it home. It will never have more effects. It will never have more tracks. It's what it is...forever. With software you can be as simple or professional as you want. You can upgrade any time. You can download effects from all over the web if you want - VST and DXi. And it's all real-time destructionless.

And the editing. I don't know how I would even use a machine after using the editing features of a software sequencer. Fade out, destructionless cutting and pasting...etc.

We only get this question from people who don't know the possibilities of a software sequencer. When you learn how to use your Cubase SE, you'll laugh at this post. I use Cakewalk, so I'm not sure how Cubase is laid out. There's a lot of power in that little program. It probably has too much going on for you to feel comfortable with it. But going backwards to some archaic hardware machine is giving in to technological ignorance. Don't do that. Charge forward and figure it out. There's a lot to learn, no doubt. But it's worth it.

I hated Cakewalk when I first bought it. It took me almost half an hour just to figure out how to get it to start recording. And then it didn't record right. It recorded slower than I played. After a few days, a few posts and pleas for help and lots of reading, I figured it all out. Sounds like a bit of effort, but it's worth it in the long run.
#5
Cheers guys

Thanks alot Paranoia that really helped I'm gonna give Cubase more of a chance.
#6
Quote by Dutch_Apples
I HATE Cubase. That Foxtex Mr-8 is a joke also. I would go with Logic, DP, Pro Tools, etc. and get a damn good audio interface. You'll be taken care of then.


personal preference(cubase)....

well frusci... that depends on your game. do you like intricate solo guitar pieces and do it slow or less intricate but more energetic band pieces.

If you are frustrated with cubase , i'll recommend for you to spend a few dollars on a cubase guide . Try get the guitarist's guide (warning: it recommends sound cards and midi devices but shows their prices in english.)

Even though i haven't used my cuby for a few weeks , i love it.
#7
I LOVE Cubase SX3. I'm a fulltime recording engineer / producer and Cubase SX3 does everything I need from programming dance / techno music to recording death metal bands.

Cubase is extremely well thought out and offers tremendous routing options. I can't see why anyone wouldn't like it unless they had $15,000 to get Pro Tools HD3 with integrated DSP processing.

I CAN'T STAND these standalone units. You waste so much time learning a proprietary system that by the time you get to record, your recorder is out of date. You don't have very many plugin options. Backing up data is usually a pain. If you decide you want to use a sampler or Reason, you are screwed.

I think the standalone concept is terrible, personally.


There is something about recording onto computer software that I really never got on with.

Fair enough. But can you explain to me the difference between a electronics box that records digitally onto a hard disk vs an electronics box that records digitally onto a hard disk?