Page 1 of 2
#1
Me and a few friends are starting a project, we plan to make a 32 player side scrolling snes style graphics shooter. It's sort of like super smash bros, but just shooter we plan to have lots of game types. Is anyone interested in helping?
if people are interested, i'll post positions later...

Starting Forums @ ShadowFaction.jconserv.net
Details:
Display Mode: 640x480 Fullscreen
Multiplayer Map size 1920x720
Modes Of Play:
1)Single Player
2)Multiplayer
Side Scrolling
Move With Keyboard, Aim With Mouse
Running On WinXP
OpenGL (SDL)

Programs:
Bloodshed Dev-C++
Adobe Photoshop


Jobs
Engine: MangledPhox
Graphics: IXI3NIGMAIXI (not on UG), KillEmAll
Music:
Site:

I will soon be trying to put up files on Dropboks.com
Dropboks Info:
Email:dtzeroband@yahoo.com
Pass:acore3
Feel free to add anything, but please don't delete anything...


(PS. I can only get on once a day, so if you think im "bumping", im not.)
Last edited by MangledPhox at Jan 29, 2007,
#3
Sounds a lot like Soldat. Check it out, super cool game.
Quote by lizarday
oh yeah? well larry king the slayer guitarist owns bc rich guitars. (i think)
#4
I have to do this sort of thing for my degree, and it's not fun.
Quote by Necrophagist777

I agree, i always help people up. At the last show we all protected this little kid who was tying his shoe in the middle of the pit.


http://www.mylot.com/?ref=Phase3
#6
I wish I could help but I don't know the language well enough and even if I did I simply don't have the time. Good luck anyway.

Ibanez RG1570 Prestige
Laney VC15
Boss DS-1
Jim Dunlop Crybaby
#7
Just how good are you with C++?

A project like this requires extensive knowledge of programming and networking and, among other things, the Win32 API (assuming your application will run under Windows). Win32 is NOT easy.
Dear God, do you actually answer prayers?

Yes, but only in a way indistinguishable from random luck or the result of your own efforts.
#8
Listen to Marius, he speaks the truth. Not to mention all the time you'll be spending with graphics and animations (takes just as much time as actually programming. Been there, done that. Not cool to do it alone.)
#9
^+1
Quote by demoniacfashion
Is there any black people on UG?
I don't think a lot of black people play guitar anymore.

Quote by Oasis-fanatic
they all kinda went extinct after hendrix really.


Needless to say, I lol'ed.

Quote by human panda
Appart from being on UG or wanking, thats what i mostly do
#10
Tell us more about this, what programs you use etc. If you havnt done it before then you will struggle, and itll take ages. Have you noticed how bug game companys have loads of people working on that 1 game...
#11
My advice is, if this is your first project, (which I for some reason assume) start with something really simple. Pong, for example. I know it sounds boring, but you'll gain a lot more experience with actually completing something instead of having a bunch of half-finished crap that doesn't work (again, been there, done that-- waste of time - not cool)
#12
The guy didn't ask for advice he asked for volunteers to help in the project.

What platform will the game run on ?
What API's are you planning to use ?
Will the game be open source ?
Do you have any artists on board to design the graphics ?
Do you have a design ready ?

Hit me up when you've got the game design completed and a road map for the project. I might be interested in helping out if I like the game idea and I think it has a chance of becoming something.
#13
Sounds like Gunster......Its plays and looks like a really updated version of Soldats. Go to www.ijji.com and search Gunster.


But yeah, how familiar are you with C++ programing? >_>
#14
Speaking as a 4th year Software Engineering student, I say good luck with that.

C++ is harder than java and even a decent 2D game requires hundreds of thousand of lines of code.

Collaborating code with people online won't really work either...
Quote by jimtaka
i'd say your guitar is out of tune, or you are accidentally muting strings that you aren't trying to, or your right hand isn't strumming at the same time that your left hand is fretting, or you could be reading the tab upside down...
Last edited by PurpleMonkeyDW at Jan 22, 2007,
#15
Quote by PurpleMonkeyDW
Collaborating code with people online won't really work either...
Yeah just look at Linux, postfix, KDE, Apple's Safari & Darwin (OSX Kernel based on BSD), Firefox, Thunderbird ... guess I should list some examples of games ... BZFlag; Crystal Space (3d engine); all the various projects that have been done with the doom, quake and quakeII engines once ID open sourced them; tux racer; NetHack; FreeCiv ... and the list goes on.

All of those projects contain code contributions from people all over the world and they're all total failures.

</sarcasm>

Edit: fixed typo, I typed quakeIII when I meant quakeII.
Last edited by garett at Jan 22, 2007,
#16
I actually made a pretty decent game a while ago with a program called gamemaker. It was sort of a click fest arcade game on crack. Things would pop up all over the screen and you'd have to click on them to kill them. Each level they got progressively faster. And I even through in a few bonus items like extra time or extra points.

It was fun. I was thinking about making a sidescrolling shooter like galaga but I lost interest. Maybe I'll start it up again in the future.
#18
Naw, i haven't lost interest, i can't get on the net a whole lot... but yeah, it's our first project, but we're making a team for it, that's why i asked for help here, and i know it will be alot of work, we don't have alot of knowledge in C++ but i have a middling knowledge of BASIC (i know, no comparison...), and help in ALL categories is accecpted, i sort of planned on alot of help from other people. and thanks for the advice i will heed most of it. i have also gotten replys like the "gunster" one, yeah sort of like that, but we plan on making it a community, also, i am going to post open positions at the top post. Thank you.
#21
Quote by futurejmmy102
Never got C++ (didn't have enough money )
?

C++ is an ISO standard ... it's not a product, or software, or something tangible that costs money.

If you're talking about a c++ development environment (software to develop and build c++ applications with) there are tons of free ones out there. Bloodshed Dev-C++ is an excellent one for win32. Of course if you're serious about getting into software development then a Linux or BSD system is your best friend.
#22
Quote by DaveGilmour1189
Personally, I'm a fan of java, but whatever floats your boat.
:\

Languages are just tools and each language has it's own strengths and is designed for a different purpose.

A good programmer would have an understanding of language theory and would be able to chose the best language for any given task.

For example, you wouldn't program a high-end 3d game engine in a scripting language like python. Just as you wouldn't code a simple shell script in c++.

Most games aren't developed in a single language, either. Anything requiring direct access to the hardware (graphics, networking etc.) would be programmed in a low level systems language like c/c++ and the high level logic code (for stuff like AI, maps etc.) would be programmed in a scripting language. Popular choices for scripting are python, tcl, ruby ... even lisp in some cases. In a few cases the language might even be developed solely for the game, as was the case with Sims2 (the objects in the game that the sims interact with were programmed with a specialized language developed solely for the game to describe their actions and behaviour etc.)

Java is excellent for scalable multi-user applications. It has a very high level of abstraction which makes it perfect to develop API's that would be used throughout a large application. For that reason it's an extremely popular choice to develop web applications with. Ebay's system is written in Java and we used Java for a web-based office suite that was programmed for a dot com I used to work at.

Java can be alright for games that don't require a lot of interaction with the hardware (ie: anything that's graphics intensive and needs all the processing power it can get). It's uncommon to use Java to interface directly with hardware since it's a very high-level language that focuses on abstraction from anything low-level.

With that said, I think C++ would be an ideal choice to develop a side scroller with. You could use a high level gaming API like SDL to keep things simple and you'd have the ability to make your design object oriented, which will give you a lot of the design benefits that Java provides while still having access to the hardware if you need it.
Last edited by garett at Jan 22, 2007,
#23
Could someone explain to me exactly what the API is? I'm under the impression that it has something to do with the windows in windows... if so, it's going to be fullscreen, not windowed....
#24
I'd love to help but am only a first year Games Development student, not too familiar with C++ but can help with level design or something similar. Im not too bad with the old graphics, depending on the package used
Liberation Minister of the UK Price War Army. PM Felkara to join


Quote by Teh Traineez0rz
You idiot....you set your hair on fire for a dollar.

Did you buy some intelligence afterwards??
#25
The API is an interface that a certain system provides, so that a programmer can make use of the system's services.

For instance when you open a window in Windows you use the Win32 API to request that the routine which draws the window be run. In order to do that, you have access to classes and services to aid you, which are part of the API.
Dear God, do you actually answer prayers?

Yes, but only in a way indistinguishable from random luck or the result of your own efforts.
#26
Make it like liero, only online multiplayer. I'd sign up as a betatester
████████████████████████████
███████████████████████████
█████████████████████████
██████████████████████████
███████████████████████████
███████████████████████████
███████████████████████████
███████████████████████████
#27
Quote by Mad Marius
The API is an interface that a certain system provides, so that a programmer can make use of the system's services.

For instance when you open a window in Windows you use the Win32 API to request that the routine which draws the window be run. In order to do that, you have access to classes and services to aid you, which are part of the API.
To clarify further, we're not talking about the API but an or a set of APIs.

There isn't one single API out there. API stands for Application Programming Interface and it's a collection of pre-written code that does grunt work for you and saves you time so that you don't have to code everything from scratch.

Often times the word "library" is used interchangeably with API. The main difference between a library and an API is that a library could contain several APIs within it.

A good example is the C standard library. You can do literally anything in C/C++, but the main reason for that is because the languages themselves aren't designed to do anything specific, and so they don't really do a whole lot. They're extremely low-level languages that provide the most basic functions for communicating with the system. The C standard library is a set of API's, written in C, that provide more high-level functions for doing simple tasks such as input/output, advanced mathematical functions (basic arithmetic is provided with the language but the APIs contained in the C standard library provide functions for doing advanced stuff like logarithms etc.), networking etc.

Another thing that an API can provide is portability. Like I said, with C/C++ you have the means to communicate directly with the system, but not much else. Now realize that every system (Linux vs. Windows etc.) has a different way of doing things. Without APIs you would need to code your program entirely from scratch every time you wanted to port it to a new system. An API will eliminate the vast majority of that work by providing a single interface that will work with many different systems. So the API will handle all of the technical system-level grunt work for you and allow you to focus on writing a single code-base that will port to each system.

Of course, not all APIs are designed to provide portability. DirectX is an example of a set of APIs that only work on Win32. But DirectX is a great example of a library that's very common. It contains APIs for writing games. Direct3D provides you with pre-written routines for doing 3d graphics. DirectSound provides an interface to the sound device etc.

SDL is a good example of a gaming library that is portable. It stands for Simple Direct MediaLayer and it's similar to DirectX only it works across multiple systems and allows you to write portable games.

MFC is a win32 API that stands for Microsoft Foundation Classes and it provides a framework for win32 applications. Most Windows applications use MFC to provide the very basic functionality of a Windows application (creating Windows, dialog boxes, menus etc.) MFC extends on the very basic win32 API that MadMarius was talking about.

APIs are not only limited to C/C++ either and you can do anything with them. The point of APIs are to provide you with re-usable code for doing specific tasks that an application would otherwise need to write from scratch. It saves you tons of time and work, and if you're using a portable API it will also save you tons of headaches when trying to port your application to another system.

The APIs that you decide to use when writing a program are a major design decision that need to be decided on before you start writing the code. They will have a major impact on how your program works and how you will go about coding it.
Last edited by garett at Jan 24, 2007,
#28
Quote by garett
Yeah just look at Linux, postfix, KDE, Apple's Safari & Darwin (OSX Kernel based on BSD), Firefox, Thunderbird ... guess I should list some examples of games ... BZFlag; Crystal Space (3d engine); all the various projects that have been done with the doom, quake and quakeII engines once ID open sourced them; tux racer; NetHack; FreeCiv ... and the list goes on.

All of those projects contain code contributions from people all over the world and they're all total failures.

</sarcasm>

Edit: fixed typo, I typed quakeIII when I meant quakeII.


Wow what a douche

Those are all plugins, or built using existing tools.

I'm talking about building something from the ground up. You think linux was built by guys emailing each other code "yeah this does such and such, you're gonna have to paste it in in this file", reply: "oh i changed that file the other day, i doubt it will work now"

Working on big projects just isn't practical to send online...

prove me wrong though
Quote by jimtaka
i'd say your guitar is out of tune, or you are accidentally muting strings that you aren't trying to, or your right hand isn't strumming at the same time that your left hand is fretting, or you could be reading the tab upside down...
#29
Quote by PurpleMonkeyDW
You think linux was built by guys emailing each other code "yeah this does such and such, you're gonna have to paste it in in this file", reply: "oh i changed that file the other day, i doubt it will work now"



Yes, that's how open-source software is developed, but you put it in very simple terms.

One central programmer develops untested (or incomplete) software, releases the source code under the GNU license, and other unrelated programmers work to enhance the functionality and send feedback to the original programmer, who releases a new verision if sufficient improvement has been done. And they all communicate through irc, forums, mail.
Dear God, do you actually answer prayers?

Yes, but only in a way indistinguishable from random luck or the result of your own efforts.
Last edited by Mad Marius at Jan 24, 2007,
#30
Quote by PurpleMonkeyDW
Wow what a douche

Those are all plugins, or built using existing tools.

I'm talking about building something from the ground up. You think linux was built by guys emailing each other code "yeah this does such and such, you're gonna have to paste it in in this file", reply: "oh i changed that file the other day, i doubt it will work now"

Working on big projects just isn't practical to send online...

prove me wrong though
You're a 4th year software engineering student ?

How the hell you managed to pass the first 3 years is really beyond me.

Yeah ok ... Linux is a plug-in

As for using existing tools ... I really don't get the point that you were trying to make, because that was simply the most idiotic, brain-dead thing that I have ever heard in my entire life. Of COURSE they're built using existing tools! Every single application in existence is. Open-source or otherwise. When was the last time you sat down to write something and you had to develop the compiler and text editor first ? Or build your operating system ?

Look... the way most open source applications are maintained is through code revision programs like CVS, BitKeeper etc. which are similar to Microsoft's Visual SourceSafe ... alternatively, the code branches are released on anonymous FTP servers.

What happens is that someone has an idea for a new application and he starts working on it by himself. When he has something small working he'll release it on the Internet and call it version 0.0.1 or whatever. He does this by either creating an online CVS repository (or before such programs existed they used FTP) and he uploads it there. Other developers online download it, check it out etc. Then they start to make changes, add features etc.. They compile their changes, test them out on their own machines and when they've got something to contribute they create something called a patch file. The patch file is a single file that contains the differences between his version of the code (ie: the version with his changes) and the original 0.0.1. It might sound complex but there's tools to do this for you (on Linux there's a tool called 'diff' - one simple command and you've got a patch file ready to submit).

The developer then submits that patch to the project maintainer who, if he likes the changes and approves, merges it into his code. All of the patches that get submitted are against the current development release. When the project maintainer feels that it's ready he'll take the current development branch that he has on his own machine and he'll "release" it as version 0.0.2 (or whatever). All patches are always made against the current "development version".

The development versions get tested by people who are comfortable using beta/alpha software. They download the development versions to try them out and submit bug reports etc.

Usually all of the developers stay in touch through online mailing lists or forums etc. They contribute their thoughts and opinions and the project leader (usually the guy who conceived of the project and created the first initial code) is the guy who keeps the whole thing running smoothly.

When the developers feel that their development versions are becoming stable (ie: the bug reports start to die down, people use the development versions all the time with few problems etc.) then they'll release a "stable" version. At this point it would become version 1.0 or whatever. Then more people will download it and start to use it because it's considered stable. At this point the only changes that get made are bug fixes.

Then the developers will fork the stable version into the next development version and the cycle moves on.

All of the programs that I cited as examples in my first post are most certainly NOT plug-ins. They are massive standalone applications and they were all developed 100% from scratch this way.

I suggest you read Eric Raymond's "The Cathedral and the Bazaar" for a good start on how the whole open source thing works and why.

Edit: FWIW - Most private, closed-source, commercial applications are also developed this way - they just pay their developers. It's extremely common for one part of an application to be written in one office while other parts are written by other developers in offices elsewhere. In certain cases companies even allow their developers to telecommute. At one company I worked for we had a development team in Belgrade, former Yugoslavia, Mountain View California and Windsor, Ontario. We all collaborated via e-mail and telephone.
Last edited by garett at Jan 24, 2007,
#31
Ok, so can anyone tell me how to use the API to fullscreen a program in 640x480 mode and display a picture?
#32
I'm not gonna write code for you because even you yourself are not sure what you want to do. You have to be far more specific about your requirements when you want to program something. What should the game look like, the enviromnent, what will the gameplay involve, the weapons, physics, stuff like that.

Besides, there are MOUNTAINS of tutorials on the Internet, as well as forums dedicated to game development.

Before starting a project you should know what you want done in very specific terms, and you should do research on how it can be done. You have done neither, and besides asking for aid in intermediate or advanced programming on a guitar forum probably isn't the best idea.
Dear God, do you actually answer prayers?

Yes, but only in a way indistinguishable from random luck or the result of your own efforts.
#33
I could help you with backround music I guess...

But this will take you forever.
"Imagine all the people, sharing all the world"
-John Lennon
#35
Quote by MangledPhox
Ok, so can anyone tell me how to use the API to fullscreen a program in 640x480 mode and display a picture?
I get the feeling you didn't read my post :\
#36
Quote by DaveGilmour1189
Personally, I'm a fan of java, but whatever floats your boat.

this will take a looooooooong time.


Pshhh... Python is where it is at now.

#!/usr/bin/python

print "hello world"

#end of program :P
A guitar is your personality expressed through 6 strings.
#37
Quote by Archaon
I actually made a pretty decent game a while ago with a program called gamemaker. It was sort of a click fest arcade game on crack. Things would pop up all over the screen and you'd have to click on them to kill them. Each level they got progressively faster. And I even through in a few bonus items like extra time or extra points.

It was fun. I was thinking about making a sidescrolling shooter like galaga but I lost interest. Maybe I'll start it up again in the future.


Gamemaker's graphics/external objects are limited.

But for a side-shooter, it would be great to use. Easy language, but not to limited for what it is. If you spend $10 for the pro version, it could do internet.
#38
Quote by Kensai
Make it like liero, only online multiplayer. I'd sign up as a betatester

OMG A LIERO FAN?! That game was so oldschool.
Quote by Neogioh
Gamemaker's graphics/external objects are limited.

But for a side-shooter, it would be great to use. Easy language, but not to limited for what it is. If you spend $10 for the pro version, it could do internet.

I got the full version via torrent. It's a fun little program and I've seen some INSANE things done with it.
#39
I used to make games in a program called Multimedia Fusion. It was pretty cool, I made a side-scrolling ninja game where you shoot shurikens and dudes fall over and shit. And then I made a sweet pacman-like game only you don't collect dots and you have powerups. And then for a bonus level you have to avoid some random clown who cases you while you collect ice cream tokens. , I was a crazy kid.
Quote by cubedeathk

No my friends Dinosaurs walked this earth with Man.


#40
I read the post, I understand what the API's are now, but i don't know how to access them and use them. I have alot of idea of how the game is going to run, i'm not exactly sure how to explain it, i've been trying to find my own forums to describe it all, but im using the internet from school, and they're REALLY strict... i'm suprised I'm even able to get on UG...
Page 1 of 2