#1
What chords are in they key/scale of E penationic minor? I know of G major and E minor, but I couldn't figure out any of the other ones.
Also, why does it only have 5 notes, A, B, D, G, E? I think I read somewhere that scales are supposed to have 7, or maybe I read it wrong, or I'm just completely wrong.
#2
wut part of penta-tonic dont you understand?
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#3
not sure of the chords but for the scales pentatonic has 5 notes hence penta and all other scales have seven notes such as natural minor and the major scale and them sort of ones if that helps
#6
Em Fm G A Bm Cm D I think


that's bull.

pentatonic doesn't have a lot of chords, which is why usually songwriters take a bit help from minor/natural minor/aeolian, whatever the * you wanna call it.

you can still solo over it with pentatonics though.
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#7
Quote by JordantheAxe
Em Fm G A Bm Cm D I think


this is incorrect, i believe that technically, in E minor Pentatonic it is

Em, G maj, Am, Bm, D maj
#8
I might as well ask another stupid question while I'm at it. Can you play the Am chord with an open E string on the low E string, or not? And if not, is it because you're not starting with the root note?

e|-0-|
B|-1-|
G|-2-|
D|-2-|
A|-0-|
E|-0-|
instead of:
e|-0-|
B|-1-|
G|-2-|
D|-2-|
A|-0-|
E|-X-|
#9
There is a plethora of misinformation in this thread, so I’m going to try to clarify a few things.

Quote by hecksport
I might as well ask another stupid question while I'm at it. Can you play the Am chord with an open E string on the low E string, or not? And if not, is it because you're not starting with the root note?


e|-0-|
B|-1-|
G|-2-|
D|-2-|
A|-0-|
E|-0-|
instead of:
e|-0-|
B|-1-|
G|-2-|
D|-2-|
A|-0-|
E|-X-|

You can play any note as the lowest note, even notes that aren't in the chord! When a chord tone that isn't the root is the lowest note, the chord is called an inversion. When a non chord-tone is the lowest note, the chord is a slash chord. A/G is a slash chord. In this case, you would play an A major chord with G as the lowest note. Here is one way to play it:

e|-0-|
B|-2-|
G|-2-|
D|-2-|
A|-0-|
E|-3-|


I suggest trying to avoid hitting the low E when I play that A chord. I just don’t like the sound of that big, heavy E string ringing.

Quote by z4twenny
this is incorrect, i believe that technically, in E minor Pentatonic it is

Em, G maj, Am, Bm, D maj
Em, yes. G, yes. Am, no, as there is no C. It would be Asus. Bm, no, there’s no F#. It would be Bsus no5 add b6. D maj, no, there is no F#. It would be Dsus.

As you can see, building chords from the minor pentatonic is pretty ridiculous. Generally, you will base your progression on the full minor scale and then just use the pentatonic for the melody/solo. The pentatonic is also used in major blues, as bizarre as that sounds. It doesn’t make any theoretical sense, it just sounds good, so we do it.

Pentatonic scales only have 5 notes because of the prefix “penta.” Penta means “five,” hence a pentagon has 5 sides and a pentatonic scale has 5 notes. Tonic of course refers to tones, so you have five tones in a pentatonic scale.

Some other things to keep in mind:
Key=root note and tonality (third) and fifth (kind of implied, but whatever)
Scale=root and third, but also 6ths and 2nds and such
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Jan 23, 2007,
#10
can someone tab out a scale in e pentatonic minor?
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#11

e-0-3---
B-0-3---
G-0-2---
D-0-2---
A-0-2---
E-0-3---


Obviously, you play those notes individually (or sometimes together, just don't think of that as two chords). That is only one way to play the scale; any group of E G A B D is an acceptable way to play the scale. That fingering is very common for the minor pentatonic, but for E, the scale will usually be played at the 12th fret, so just move that scale up 12 frets.
#13
Quote by z4twenny
oops my bad, sorry for the misinformation, sleepy day yesterday
Yeah, I was surpirised to see you post something like that, but everyone gets a muligan, so all is forgiven.
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Jan 23, 2007,
#14
Quote by moup
Isn't E the relative minor of G? So shouldn't you be able to play G, Am, Bm, C, D, Em, F# Dim? But since A, B, D, G, E are the only notes in E minor pentatonic it should be Am, Bm, D, G, and Em?


If I'm wrong someone correct me.
You're wrong. Please see my post for chords based on the pentatonic scale.
#15
chordally, G maj pentatonic would contain the same chords as E minor pentatonic, it would just have the root note shifted up from E to G. a good example in G might be
G, Bsus, Dsus, E
#16
Quote by z4twenny
chordally, G maj pentatonic would contain the same chords as E minor pentatonic, it would just have the root note shifted up from E to G. a good example in G might be
G, Bsus, Dsus, E
I know you meant Em, but even so, those chords don't fit in the G major pentatonic.

Or did you just mean a good G major progression in general?
#17
Just keep going up fifths.

The fifth of E is B, the fifth of B is F#, the fifth of F# is C#.

E minor will work in different ways over all those.
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#18
Quote by anoceanapart
Just keep going up fifths.

The fifth of E is B, the fifth of B is F#, the fifth of F# is C#.

E minor will work in different ways over all those.
There's no C# in the E minor pentatonic, and if you continue your little pattern, you arrive at G#, which isn't even in the key of E minor. What are you trying to do?
#19
Oh my. Like someone said before, there is a ton of bad information in this thread.

As far as making a chord progression based on the pentatonic scale, I have never even heard of that being done. You really just make your progression based on the scale on which the song is based. So, a song in the key of E natural minor would most likely make use of the chords Em, F#dim, G, Am, Bm, C, D.

Let's also remember that a pentatonic scale is just a normal diatonic scale with the second and sixth scale degrees removed.

So the E natural minor scale is:
E F# G A B C D
1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Thus, making the E minor pentatonic scale:
E X G A B X D (X meaning a note was removed, it's just a placeholder)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Progressions are just built from the key of the song (that's not entirely accurate, but it'll do for now). Even though a song's key (which is really just a tool to make reading music easier) may be one thing, one can use many, many different scales to make melodies in that same key. If that didn't make any sense, review some of the theory articles people have written here at UG
Last edited by powerhalf at Jan 24, 2007,
#21
Too lazy to read the other posts, so this might already be answered but this is what you do. Take the Natural Minor Scale. This case, your using E.

E, F#, G, A, B, C, D, E...So those are you notes. In the pentatonic, there are no half steps, only full and 1 and 1/2 steps, so to reach this you need to take 2 notes out of the scale. This is always the 2nd and 6th note in the scale (4th and 7th if you using Major).

So now you have....
E, G, A, B, D, E....
here's your first fingering (sorry it's not in code I'm using quick reply)
e----------------------------------------------12-15-12--------------------------------------------
b-------------------------------------12-15--------------15-12------------------------------------
g----------------------------12-14--------------------------------14-12---------------------------
d-------------------12-14--------------------------------------------------14-12------------------
a----------12-14--------------------------------------------------------------------14-12---------
E-12-15--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------15-12-
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#22
Chords aren't in pentatonic keys. THat doesn't make sense.
You NEVER derive chords using the pentatonic, and pentatonics have no set chords. You derive the chords from the respective scale, whether you be playing the minor pentatonic, the major pentatonic, whatever.

And, any diatonic scale will consist of TT[ST]TTT[ST] (major), re-arranged somehow, but always with a TT[ST] and a TTT[ST] somewhere. (Modes are derived by shifting this pattern - Dorian would be T[ST]TTT[ST]T, phyrigian would be [ST]TTT[ST]TT, etc.) These are the seven note scales you're hearing of. It's inaccurate to say ALL scales have seven notes, because that's not true -- ALL DIATONIC (which, granted, are the most common) scales have seven notes.
But the pentatonic scale is not diatonic; it has five notes (penta?) and is derived from the first, third, fourth, fifth, and seventh (in the case of the minor, anyway) of the relative diatonic scale.
#23
^You can get chords from the Pentatonic, there just aren't as many available and its fairly pointless to do, but you can.
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#24
penta=5 tonic=root note
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