#1
Ok, well i posted this in the electric guitar forum and got no response so.....anyone know what scale is used in the solo to Santeria by Sublime?
Ask me no questions, i will tell you no lies...
#3
Well i searched it and you only posted about what key the song is in...i'm looking for what scale..like major, natural minor, etc.
Ask me no questions, i will tell you no lies...
#4
Quote by Mr. Anderson
Well i searched it and you only posted about what key the song is in...i'm looking for what scale..like major, natural minor, etc.
It's all E major except for a few chromatic runs that make no theoretical sense.

He fools around quite a bit, so it's not all in one scale. Lydian and Mixolydian appear, but it's just regular E major for the most part.
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Jan 23, 2007,
#5
The solo is composed entirely of the E major scale, save a few passing tones (C and G).

ed: pfft
#6
ok thanks, i guess thats what you meant in the first place, i just wasnt thinking..thanks
Ask me no questions, i will tell you no lies...
#7
Taking it chord by chord:

E: e major penta licks. Sure, call it E major if you want to.

G#: can't call this E major penta, this lick is centered around the D# note (not found in E maj penta)

C#m: you could call it E major penta, or C# minor penta... its based around the fourth fret, same place you'd play a C#m chord (A form)

B: chromatic run, 3 notes per string starting on sixth string, that as banGoodChar pointed out makes no sense theoretically, makes more sense when you look at it visually, more of a visual shape/pattern, could also be seen as E maj penta with passing notes

E: still sounds more like E major penta then E major, but whatever, it ends on...

G#: ... G# and C notes. Hey, C is not in E major scale. But it is the third of the G# chord.

C#m: bending third and second strings at eleventh fret. Real common double-stop lick, one of the most common there is. Hard to say this would be E major, seems more intuitive to associat it with C#, since
1) one of the notes in this dbl-stop bend isn't in the E major scale
2) C#m triad on top three strings immediately follows this double-stop bend each time
3) visually, this lick seems to come from where it normally comes from, namely the E form of the underlying chord (meaning, for C#m, based around ninth fret), and not
4) from G form of chord, meaning if we're still thinking E scale instead of C#m, this lick now comes off the G form (E = ninth fret), taking the second and sharp fourth of the scale and bending each up a half step is not a real normal thing to do, but not unheard of either (example: Memphis by Chuck Berry)

B: above licks sustained halfway thru this chord, unsure about remaining half, losing interest in this project... zzz

... but to sum up, one of the wisest things I ever heard was "do you play off the key, or off the chord?" Usually in rock its off the key, in jazz I think its more oftentimes off the chord, but in both cases its not a hard and fast rule, lots of times in rock guys will do little fills that are based more off underlying chord then the key of the solo.

And no matter whether you're thinking underlying key or underlyign chord, being aware of those chord tones (root third fifth) helps makes for higher probabillity of notes sounding "right", for example, how he's playing over the G# chord above, the notes he chooses to focus on